Prosocial Behavior and Volunteerism to Promote Physical Activity in Older Adults

This study is currently recruiting participants. (see Contacts and Locations)
Verified April 2013 by Wake Forest Baptist Health
Sponsor:
Information provided by (Responsible Party):
Capri Foy, Wake Forest University Baptist Medical Center
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier:
NCT01528761
First received: January 31, 2012
Last updated: April 3, 2013
Last verified: April 2013
  Purpose

The purpose of this 12-month study is to compare how well two programs help older adults make physical activity a regular habit.


Condition Intervention
Physical Activity
Behavioral: Prosocial Behavior Physical Activity (PBPA)
Other: Healthy Aging (HA)

Study Type: Interventional
Study Design: Allocation: Randomized
Endpoint Classification: Efficacy Study
Intervention Model: Parallel Assignment
Masking: Open Label
Primary Purpose: Prevention
Official Title: Prosocial Behavior and Volunteerism to Promote Physical Activity in Older Adults

Further study details as provided by Wake Forest Baptist Health:

Primary Outcome Measures:
  • physical activity [ Time Frame: 12 months ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
    Self-reported physical activity will be assessed using a questionnaire at 4 time points among all participants; (1) at baseline before randomization; (2) 3 months after the interventions begin; (3) 6 months after the interventions begin; and (4) 12 months after the interventions begin


Secondary Outcome Measures:
  • physical function [ Time Frame: 12 months ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
    A series of 3 physical function tests will be administered to all participants at three time points: (1) at baseline before randomization; (2) 3 months after the interventions begin; and (3) 12 months after the interventions begin. All of the tests are brief and uncomplicated to perform.


Estimated Enrollment: 300
Study Start Date: February 2012
Estimated Study Completion Date: June 2016
Estimated Primary Completion Date: June 2016 (Final data collection date for primary outcome measure)
Arms Assigned Interventions
Experimental: Prosocial Behavior Physical Activity
The PBPA condition involves a cognitive-behavioral intervention to teach participants the behavioral skills to engage in independent physical activity. Participants will engage in supervised physical activity delivered two times a week during months 1 to 3 at the William G. White, Jr. Family YMCA in Winston-Salem, NC. During months 4 to 6, supervised sessions will be held once per week, and sessions will be held once per month in months 7 to 9. Participants will engage in completely independent physical activity in months 10 to 12. PBPA participants will also be able to earn boxes of food for donation to the Second Harvest Food Bank (SHFB) of Northwest North Carolina based upon their weekly physical activity. Lowe's Foods, a regional grocery chain, will donate the food. Participants in the PBPA intervention also will receive a 12-month membership to the William G. White, Jr. Family YMCA at no cost.
Behavioral: Prosocial Behavior Physical Activity (PBPA)
The PBPA condition involves a cognitive-behavioral intervention to teach participants the behavioral skills to engage in independent physical activity. Participants will engage in supervised physical activity delivered two times a week during months 1 to 3 at the William G. White, Jr. Family YMCA in Winston-Salem, NC. During months 4 to 6, supervised sessions will be held once per week, and sessions will be held once per month in months 7 to 9. Participants will engage in completely independent physical activity in months 10 to 12. PBPA participants will also be able to earn boxes of food for donation to the Second Harvest Food Bank (SHFB) of Northwest North Carolina based upon their weekly physical activity. Lowe's Foods, a regional grocery chain, will donate the food. Participants in the PBPA intervention also will receive a 12-month membership to the William G. White, Jr. Family YMCA at no cost.
Active Comparator: Healthy Aging (HA)
Behavioral: Healthy Aging (HA) The HA group will receive a health education intervention based on topics from several sources, including the National Institute on Aging's Age Pages, University of Pittsburgh's 10 Keys to Healthy Aging; and Stanford University's Successful Aging program, among other topics . The HA intervention will receive ongoing staff contact, and will provide participants with excellent information on health-related topics. Biweekly 45-minute lectures will be given during months 1 to 6, and once per month during months 7 to 9. After each session, participants will engage in a 15-minute stretching routine. During months 10 to 12, no lectures will be given. After completion of the 12-month assessments, participants will receive a 12-month membership to the YMCA at no cost.
Other: Healthy Aging (HA)
The HA group will receive a health education intervention based on topics from several sources, including the National Institute on Aging's Age Pages, University of Pittsburgh's 10 Keys to Healthy Aging; and Stanford University's Successful Aging program, among other topics . The HA intervention will receive ongoing staff contact, and will provide participants with excellent information on health-related topics. Biweekly 45-minute lectures will be given during months 1 to 6, and once per month during months 7 to 9. After each session, participants will engage in a 15-minute stretching routine. During months 10 to 12, no lectures will be given. After completion of the 12-month assessments, participants will receive a 12-month membership to the YMCA at no cost.

Detailed Description:

Although only a small percentage of older adults engage in habitual physical activity, previous studies have demonstrated interventions that include cognitive-behavioral strategies can enhance long-term, independent physical activity. In addition, there are episodic charity events, such as charity walks, that attract large numbers of participants of all age ranges to engage in moderate-intensity physical activity. These actions are a form of prosocial behavior, defined as voluntary, intentional behavior that results in benefits for another. The opportunity to help others seems to be a motive in inspiring these individuals to at least engage in one session of moderate physical activity. Thus, the current research project contemplates whether prosocial behavior may be implemented as a viable behavioral incentive for long-term physical activity.

Participants in the Prosocial Behavior Physical Activity (PBPA) intervention will receive a cognitive-behavioral intervention to teach participants the behavioral skills necessary to engage in long-term (12-month) independent physical activity. Participants in the Healthy Aging (HA) intervention will receive excellent educational sessions based on a number of topics of relevance to older adults. Both programs will provide supervised stretching sessions so that participants learn how to safely and effectively improve flexibility, which helps reduce the likelihood of falls and disability. However, the PBPA intervention will also allow participants to earn food for donation to Second Harvest Food Bank based on their regular physical activity and volunteer time.

  Eligibility

Ages Eligible for Study:   55 Years to 80 Years
Genders Eligible for Study:   Both
Accepts Healthy Volunteers:   Yes
Criteria

Inclusion Criteria:

  • between 55 and 80 years of age
  • physically underactive
  • no evidence of any major psychological illness
  • residence within 20 miles of study site
  • plans to remain in area for duration of study

Exclusion Criteria:

  • currently engaging in regular physical activity
  • self-reported evidence of cardiovascular disease
  • self-reported evidence of diabetes
  • self-reported falling within the past year
  • alcohol consumption greater than 14 drinks per week
  • inability to understand English
  • plans to move from area
  • participation in another medical intervention study
  • severe hearing or sight impairments
  Contacts and Locations
Choosing to participate in a study is an important personal decision. Talk with your doctor and family members or friends about deciding to join a study. To learn more about this study, you or your doctor may contact the study research staff using the Contacts provided below. For general information, see Learn About Clinical Studies.

Please refer to this study by its ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT01528761

Contacts
Contact: Carol Massa-Fanale, B.S. (336) 716-3589 cmassa@wakehealth.edu
Contact: Susan J Harris, B.S. (336) 713-4244 sjharris@wakehealth.edu

Locations
United States, North Carolina
Wake Forest School of Medicine Recruiting
Winston-Salem, North Carolina, United States, 27157
Principal Investigator: Capri G Foy, Ph.D.         
Sponsors and Collaborators
Wake Forest Baptist Health
Investigators
Principal Investigator: Capri G Foy, Ph.D. Wake Forest University Baptist Health
  More Information

No publications provided by Wake Forest Baptist Health

Additional publications automatically indexed to this study by ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier (NCT Number):
Responsible Party: Capri Foy, Assistant Professor, Wake Forest University Baptist Medical Center
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT01528761     History of Changes
Other Study ID Numbers: 1 R01 HL109429-01
Study First Received: January 31, 2012
Last Updated: April 3, 2013
Health Authority: United States: Institutional Review Board

Keywords provided by Wake Forest Baptist Health:
physical activity
older adults
physical function
health-related quality of life
prosocial behavior
social cognitive theory

ClinicalTrials.gov processed this record on August 18, 2014