Influencing Adolescent Girls´ With Creative Dance Twice Weekly

The recruitment status of this study is unknown because the information has not been verified recently.
Verified January 2012 by Örebro County Council.
Recruitment status was  Active, not recruiting
Sponsor:
Information provided by (Responsible Party):
Margareta Moller, University Hospital Orebro
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier:
NCT01523561
First received: January 18, 2012
Last updated: January 31, 2012
Last verified: January 2012
  Purpose

The aim of this study is to evaluate if creative dance twice weekly can influence girls wellbeing. The focus lies on girls 13-18 years old that suffer from repeatedly psychosomatic problems and/or stress.

Specific objectives are

  • To assess the effect of the dance intervention in reducing psychosomatic problems (such as pain in the head, neck, shoulder or stomach), stress and depression
  • Determine which factors are important for continuing dancing and keeping up new habits
  • A cost-effectiveness analyse of the health outcome.

Geographical area: Örebro County (population 276,000)


Condition Intervention Phase
Adolescent - Emotional Problem
Behavioral: dance group
Phase 3

Study Type: Interventional
Study Design: Allocation: Randomized
Endpoint Classification: Efficacy Study
Intervention Model: Parallel Assignment
Masking: Open Label
Primary Purpose: Treatment
Official Title: Influencing Adolescent Girls With Internalizing Problems With Creative Dance Twice Weekly. A Randomised, Controlled Study

Further study details as provided by Örebro County Council:

Primary Outcome Measures:
  • Self reported health [ Time Frame: change from baseline to follow up at 20 months ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
    the single-item question "How do you rate your general health?" is frequently used in national and international surveys. The response alternatives is 1. Very poor, 2. Poor, 3. Neither good nor poor, 4. Good, 5. Very good. Measuring general health with a five-degree scale has been agreed upon in the EU.


Secondary Outcome Measures:
  • adherence to and experience of the intervention [ Time Frame: change baseline to follow up at 20 months ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
    The adherence to the dance intervention was measured by registering attendance at every dance session during the intervention period. Cancellations were made by telephone or text message.The experience of the dance intervention was evaluated with a graphic rating scale, a modified Visual Analogue Scale with five discrete alternatives.The question was "How do you experience dancing while you perform it?"; the rating scale started at "entirely negative" and ended at "entirely positive." Cut-off was set between "neutral" and "entirely positive".


Estimated Enrollment: 150
Study Start Date: October 2009
Estimated Study Completion Date: May 2012
Primary Completion Date: January 2010 (Final data collection date for primary outcome measure)
Arms Assigned Interventions
No Intervention: usual care
The participants in the no intervention group were informed that they should continue living as usual
Experimental: dance intervention
The dance intervention took place twice weekly for a period of 1 year under the guidance of two dance class teachers. The duration of the class was 75 min. and the dance training was always carried out to popular music. The dance choreography was adjusted to the level of the participants' skills in order to make them feel successful in their exercise. During the intervention year, the theme of dance styles varied from hip hop, jazz and contemporary dance. African dance was used in the warm up section. The dance class always ended with a relaxation. The dance intervention had a focus on emphasizing the participants' resources and creates a feeling of affinity. Listening to signals from the body, reducing focus on the performance and "become part of the movement" was encouraged.
Behavioral: dance group
The dance intervention took place twice weekly for a period of 1 year under the guidance of two dance class teachers. The duration of the class was 75 min. and the dance training was always carried out to popular music. The dance choreography was adjusted to the level of the participants' skills in order to make them feel successful in their exercise. During the intervention year, the theme of dance styles varied from hip hop, jazz and contemporary dance. African dance was used in the warm up section. The dance class always ended with a relaxation. The dance intervention had a focus on emphasizing the participants' resources and creates a feeling of affinity. Listening to signals from the body, reducing focus on the performance and "become part of the movement" was encouraged.

Detailed Description:

The school nurses asked girls aged 13-18 years old, who searched for psychosomatic problems, if they wished to participate in the dance project. Recruitment of girls where also carried out in information about the project at parent meetings and in school classrooms. 143 girls completed the base-line questionnaire, 138 met the inclusion criteria and were included. Randomization was carried out to intervention and control group.

The quantitative data collection is carried out with a questionnaire. Participants in the dance intervention and the control group will response to this questionnaire at 7 times during the study, at start and every six months over a total period of 3 years.

Girls who are found to be at risk of having severe depression (> 34 points) in the depression scale CES-DC met with an experienced licensed psychologist. This was to explore if there was a need for extended support and help and the girl's parents and Child and Adolescent Psychiatric Care was contacted in most cases and if there was a risk for suicide. The results from the depression scale at base - line (CES-DC) showed that 81% of the girls in the study had depressive symptoms and 29% had high levels of depressive symptoms.

The qualitative interviews were performed in order to explore the girls experience of the dance lessons and to assess if and/or how dance intervention has affected her self-esteem in any way. These interviews were conducted on a strategic sample of 20 girls who participated in the dance intervention.

The dance intervention took place in a gym in Örebro twice weekly for a period of 1 year under the guidance of two dance class teachers (one at a time). The duration of the class was 75 minutes and the dance training was always carried out to popular and suitable music. The dance choreography was adjusted to the level of the participants' skills in order to make them feel successful in their exercise. During the intervention year, the theme of dance styles varied from hip hop, jazz, aerobic dance and contemporary dance. African dance, to the music of African drums, was used in the warm up section. The dance class always ended with a 10-min-relaxation training. The dance intervention had a strong focus on emphasizing the participants' resources and creates a feeling of affinity. The dance teachers encouraged them to listen to signals from the body, reducing focus on the performance and "become part of the movement".

  Eligibility

Ages Eligible for Study:   13 Years to 18 Years
Genders Eligible for Study:   Female
Accepts Healthy Volunteers:   No
Criteria

Inclusion Criteria:

  • The study population comprised adolescent girls with internalizing problems who had recurrent visits to the school nurse due to psychosomatic symptoms such as:

    • pain in the head, stomach, neck, back and/or shoulder.
    • persistent feelings of tiredness
    • being worried
    • in low spirit or depressed were also inclusion criteria.

Exclusion Criteria:

  • severe hearing impairment
  • intellectual disability
  • difficulties with the Swedish language or
  • if the CAP had advised against participation.
  Contacts and Locations
Please refer to this study by its ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT01523561

Locations
Sweden
Centre for health care Sciences
Örebro, Närke, Sweden, 701 13
Sponsors and Collaborators
Örebro County Council
Investigators
Principal Investigator: Margareta HL Moller, professor Örebro County Council
  More Information

Additional Information:
No publications provided

Responsible Party: Margareta Moller, professor, University Hospital Orebro
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT01523561     History of Changes
Other Study ID Numbers: MMO027
Study First Received: January 18, 2012
Last Updated: January 31, 2012
Health Authority: Sweden: Regional Ethical Review Board

Keywords provided by Örebro County Council:
dance
intervention
adolescent
girls

ClinicalTrials.gov processed this record on April 17, 2014