Comparison Study of the Nintendo Wii Versus Playstation2 in Enhancing Laparoscopic Skills

This study has been completed.
Sponsor:
Information provided by (Responsible Party):
Beth Israel Medical Center
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier:
NCT01483677
First received: November 30, 2011
Last updated: NA
Last verified: November 2011
History: No changes posted
  Purpose

The investigators believe that subjects who practice on the Nintendo Wii will improve their laparoscopic skills more than those who practice on the Playstation2.


Condition Intervention Phase
Laparoscopy Skills
Other: Nintendo Wii
Other: Playstation 2
Phase 0

Study Type: Interventional
Study Design: Allocation: Randomized
Intervention Model: Parallel Assignment
Masking: Open Label
Official Title: Is Nintendo Wii a More Suitable Video Game Platform Than Playstation 2 for Enhancing Laparoscopic Skills?

Further study details as provided by Beth Israel Medical Center:

Primary Outcome Measures:
  • Difference in the change in box trainer scores between the Wii and Playstation2 groups. [ Time Frame: 60 minutes ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
    After completion of the pretest, subjects are given a 10 minute break, 30 minutes of video game play, a 10 minute break, and 10 minutes to complete the post test.


Secondary Outcome Measures:
  • Change between pretest and post test scores in the Wii group. [ Time Frame: 60 minutes. ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
    After completion of the pretest, subjects are given a 10 minute break, 30 minutes of video game play, a 10 minute break, and 10 minutes to complete the post test.

  • Change between pretest and posttest scores for the Playstation2 group [ Time Frame: 60 minutes ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
    After completion of the pretest, subjects are given a 10 minute break, 30 minutes of video game play, a 10 minute break, and 10 minutes to complete the post test.


Enrollment: 42
Study Start Date: November 2010
Study Completion Date: March 2011
Primary Completion Date: March 2011 (Final data collection date for primary outcome measure)
Arms Assigned Interventions
Experimental: Nintendo Wii
Subjects in this arm of the study play a game (Boomblox) on the Nintendo Wii for 30 minutes.
Other: Nintendo Wii
Subjects played the game Boomblox for 30 continuous minutes on the Nintendo Wii.
Other Names:
  • Nintendo Wii
  • Boomblox
Active Comparator: Playstation2
Subjects in this arm of the study play a game (Time Crisis 2) on the Playstation 2 for 30 minutes.
Other: Playstation 2
Subjects played the game Time Crisis2 on the Playstation2 for 30 continuous minutes.
Other Names:
  • Playstation 2
  • Time Crisis

Detailed Description:

Video game experience, whether past or current, have correlated with better laparoscopy skills. Those studies were conducted using traditional game controllers. The relatively new Nintendo Wii uses a novel set of mechanics which allows for more realistic representation of player generated movements. We aim to study if the unique mechanics of the Wii can improve laparoscopy skills better than a traditional video game (Playstation 2).

  Eligibility

Ages Eligible for Study:   21 Years and older
Genders Eligible for Study:   Both
Accepts Healthy Volunteers:   Yes
Criteria

Inclusion Criteria:

  • Medical Student, Resident or Attending physician at the Beth Israel Medical center.

Exclusion Criteria:

  • None
  Contacts and Locations
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Please refer to this study by its ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT01483677

Locations
United States, New York
Beth Israel Medical Center of The Albert Einstein College of Medicine
New York, New York, United States, 10003
Sponsors and Collaborators
Beth Israel Medical Center
Investigators
Principal Investigator: Rujin Ju, M.D. Beth Israel Medical Center
Study Chair: Karen C Wang, M.D. Brigham and Women's Hospital