Effects of Aerobic and Resistance Training on Accumulation of Old, Modified Proteins in Young and Older Adults

This study is currently recruiting participants. (see Contacts and Locations)
Verified June 2014 by Mayo Clinic
Sponsor:
Information provided by (Responsible Party):
K. Sreekumaran Nair, Mayo Clinic
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier:
NCT01477164
First received: September 28, 2011
Last updated: June 3, 2014
Last verified: June 2014
  Purpose

Muscle proteins accumulate damage during aging and leads to the loss of muscle mass and function in older people. Exercise can increase the making of new proteins and removal of older proteins, but it is not known if the effect changes with aging or type of exercise. The investigators will determine the ability for endurance, resistance, or a combination of exercise training to remove older-damaged proteins and make newer-functional muscle proteins in groups of younger and older people. The investigators will particularly study protein that are involved with energy production (mitochondrial proteins) and force production (contractile proteins).

Hypothesis 1: Older people will have greater accumulation of damaged proteins than younger people.

Hypothesis 2: Aerobic exercise will decrease the accumulation of damaged forms of contractile and mitochondrial proteins in younger and older people.

Hypothesis 3: Resistance exercise will decrease the accumulation of damaged forms of contractile proteins in younger and older people.


Condition Intervention
Sarcopenia
Behavioral: High intensity aerobic exercise
Behavioral: Resistance exercise training
Behavioral: Combined

Study Type: Interventional
Study Design: Allocation: Randomized
Intervention Model: Parallel Assignment
Masking: Open Label
Primary Purpose: Basic Science
Official Title: Effects of Aerobic and Resistance Training on Accumulation of Old, Modified Proteins in Young and Older Adults

Resource links provided by NLM:


Further study details as provided by Mayo Clinic:

Primary Outcome Measures:
  • Skeletal muscle protein synthesis rate [ Time Frame: Approximately 14 weeks for the endurance or resistance training groups and approximately 28 weeks for the combined group ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
    The investigators will determine the rate of incorporation of stable isotope amino acid tracers in skeletal muscle proteins during several hours of rest. The measurement will be an average resting muscle protein synthesis rate (% new muscle protein per hour) and will be performed at baseline and following 12 weeks of exercise training.


Estimated Enrollment: 60
Study Start Date: November 2011
Estimated Study Completion Date: August 2014
Estimated Primary Completion Date: August 2014 (Final data collection date for primary outcome measure)
Arms Assigned Interventions
Experimental: Aerobic Exercise Training
Participants will perform 12-weeks of high intensity aerobic training.
Behavioral: High intensity aerobic exercise
Participants will perform 12-weeks of high intensity aerobic training. Training will be 5-days per week. Three days (e.g. Monday, Wednesday and Friday) will include repeated bouts of cycling for 4-minutes at ~90% maximal effort followed by 3 minutes of active rest. The other two days (e.g. Tuesday and Thursday) will be treadmill exercise for 45 minutes at 70% of maximal effort.
Active Comparator: Combined
The combined group will have 12-weeks of no exercise followed by 12-weeks of combined aerobic and resistance exercise training. Assessments will be made at three time points: baseline, after 12-weeks of no training, and after 12-weeks of combined training.
Behavioral: Combined
The combined group will be assessed before and after 12 weeks of no exercise training, then again following 12 weeks of combined aerobic and resistance exercise training.
Experimental: Resistance Exercise Training
Participants will perform 12-weeks of resistance exercise training.
Behavioral: Resistance exercise training
Participants will perform 12-weeks of resistance exercise training. Training will be 5-days per week of daily sessions of 60 minutes that include resistance exercise for all major muscle groups.

Detailed Description:

The loss of muscle mass and function with age leads to high social and economic costs. Lifestyle interventions that can help maintain muscle mass and function can be beneficial to improve health and decrease the costs associated with loss of independence in the elderly. Muscle proteins accumulate damage during aging, which is suggested to lead to loss of function. The biological processes that remove damaged proteins and synthesis new proteins appear to be decreased with aging. Exercise is known to increase the processes that remove older and synthesis newer muscle proteins and may be an effect lifestyle intervention to improve muscle quality and function. Additionally, specific types of proteins appear to decay with age including contractile and mitochondrial proteins. Different types of exercise training can increase the making of specific proteins. The investigators will examine the ability for aerobic and resistance training to increase the quality of mitochondrial and contractile proteins between younger and older people.

  Eligibility

Ages Eligible for Study:   18 Years to 80 Years
Genders Eligible for Study:   Both
Accepts Healthy Volunteers:   Yes
Criteria

Inclusion Criteria:

  • Healthy
  • 18 to 30 years or 65 to 80 years old
  • Male and female

Exclusion Criteria:

  • Regular exercise program
  • Smoking
  • Metabolic disease (diabetes, cardiovascular disease, cancer, thyroid disorders)
  • Pregnancy
  • Inability to exercise
  • Overweight or obesity
  • Drugs known to impair metabolic function (statin, beta-blocker, anti-inflammatory)
  • Allergies to lidocaine
  Contacts and Locations
Choosing to participate in a study is an important personal decision. Talk with your doctor and family members or friends about deciding to join a study. To learn more about this study, you or your doctor may contact the study research staff using the Contacts provided below. For general information, see Learn About Clinical Studies.

Please refer to this study by its ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT01477164

Locations
United States, Minnesota
Mayo Clinic Recruiting
Rochester, Minnesota, United States, 55905
Contact: Matthew Robinson, PhD    507-255-9610    studies.endo@mayo.edu   
Principal Investigator: K. Sreekumaran Nair, M.D., Ph.D.         
Sponsors and Collaborators
Mayo Clinic
Investigators
Principal Investigator: K. Sreekumaran Nair, M.D., Ph.D. Mayo Clinic
  More Information

No publications provided

Responsible Party: K. Sreekumaran Nair, Principal Investigator, Mayo Clinic
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT01477164     History of Changes
Other Study ID Numbers: 10-005853
Study First Received: September 28, 2011
Last Updated: June 3, 2014
Health Authority: United States: Institutional Review Board

Keywords provided by Mayo Clinic:
Exercise
Aging
Sarcopenia
Muscle function

Additional relevant MeSH terms:
Sarcopenia
Muscular Atrophy
Neuromuscular Manifestations
Neurologic Manifestations
Nervous System Diseases
Atrophy
Pathological Conditions, Anatomical
Signs and Symptoms

ClinicalTrials.gov processed this record on September 22, 2014