Reducing Energy Density by Different Methods to Decrease Energy Intake

This study has been completed.
Sponsor:
Collaborator:
Information provided by (Responsible Party):
Barbara J. Rolls, Penn State University
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier:
NCT01470300
First received: November 9, 2011
Last updated: November 10, 2011
Last verified: November 2011
  Purpose

The purpose of this research is to investigate how using different methods to reduce the energy density of entrees affects daily energy intake in adults. It is hypothesized that reducing the energy density of entrees will decrease energy intake. It is also hypothesized that reducing the energy density by incorporating fruit and vegetables will decrease energy intake more than reducing the energy density by decreasing fat content or adding plain water.


Condition Intervention
Obesity
Other: Energy density feeding study

Study Type: Interventional
Study Design: Allocation: Randomized
Intervention Model: Crossover Assignment
Masking: Single Blind (Subject)
Primary Purpose: Prevention
Official Title: Reducing Energy Density by Different Methods to Decrease Energy Intake

Resource links provided by NLM:


Further study details as provided by Penn State University:

Primary Outcome Measures:
  • Energy intake [ Time Frame: 1 month ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]

Secondary Outcome Measures:
  • Food intake [ Time Frame: 1 month ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]

Enrollment: 62
Study Start Date: September 2010
Study Completion Date: May 2011
Primary Completion Date: May 2011 (Final data collection date for primary outcome measure)
Arms Assigned Interventions
Experimental: Standard ED
100% energy density
Other: Energy density feeding study
In a crossover design, adults are served breakfast, lunch, and dinner, 1 day a week for 4 weeks. Meal entrees will vary in energy density (100% and 80%) and the method used to reduce the energy density (added fruit & vegetables, decreased fat, added plain water).
Experimental: Reduced ED - F/V
80% energy density by adding fruit and vegetables
Other: Energy density feeding study
In a crossover design, adults are served breakfast, lunch, and dinner, 1 day a week for 4 weeks. Meal entrees will vary in energy density (100% and 80%) and the method used to reduce the energy density (added fruit & vegetables, decreased fat, added plain water).
Experimental: Reduced ED - Fat
80% energy density by decreasing fat
Other: Energy density feeding study
In a crossover design, adults are served breakfast, lunch, and dinner, 1 day a week for 4 weeks. Meal entrees will vary in energy density (100% and 80%) and the method used to reduce the energy density (added fruit & vegetables, decreased fat, added plain water).
Experimental: Reduced ED - Plain water
80% energy density by adding plain water
Other: Energy density feeding study
In a crossover design, adults are served breakfast, lunch, and dinner, 1 day a week for 4 weeks. Meal entrees will vary in energy density (100% and 80%) and the method used to reduce the energy density (added fruit & vegetables, decreased fat, added plain water).

  Eligibility

Ages Eligible for Study:   20 Years to 45 Years
Genders Eligible for Study:   Both
Accepts Healthy Volunteers:   Yes
Criteria

Inclusion Criteria:

  • Adults from Penn State and surrounding community

Exclusion Criteria:

  • Currently dieting
  • Food allergies
  Contacts and Locations
Choosing to participate in a study is an important personal decision. Talk with your doctor and family members or friends about deciding to join a study. To learn more about this study, you or your doctor may contact the study research staff using the Contacts provided below. For general information, see Learn About Clinical Studies.

Please refer to this study by its ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT01470300

Locations
United States, Pennsylvania
The Pennsylvania State University
University Park, Pennsylvania, United States, 16802
Sponsors and Collaborators
Penn State University
Investigators
Principal Investigator: Barbara J Rolls Penn State University
  More Information

No publications provided

Responsible Party: Barbara J. Rolls, Principle Investigator, Penn State University
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT01470300     History of Changes
Other Study ID Numbers: FoodED401, R37DK039177-19, 2R01DK059853-10
Study First Received: November 9, 2011
Last Updated: November 10, 2011
Health Authority: United States: Institutional Review Board

ClinicalTrials.gov processed this record on October 23, 2014