Understanding Hand Hygiene Behavior at Unidad Nacional Oncologia Pediatrica (HHFG)

This study has been completed.
Sponsor:
Information provided by (Responsible Party):
St. Jude Children's Research Hospital
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier:
NCT01419054
First received: August 15, 2011
Last updated: November 21, 2013
Last verified: November 2013
  Purpose

Healthcare associated infections increase morbidity and mortality among all hospitalized patients, especially in those who are immunocompromised, in both developed and in countries with limited resources. However, when resources are limited, infection prevention and control measures are often overlooked by personnel and institutions. Hand hygiene has been shown numerous times to be the most effective way to prevent infections in the healthcare setting. In Unidad Nacional de Oncologia Pediatrica (UNOP) in Guatemala City, Guatemala, there have been several infrastructural improvements and periodic education and promotion activities. Still, acceptable hand hygiene compliance has not yet been sustainably achieved. The investigators wish to study reasons why staff at UNOP do or do not practice hand hygiene when it is indicated through the use of focus groups and interviews.


Condition
Hand Hygiene Behavior

Study Type: Observational
Study Design: Observational Model: Cohort
Time Perspective: Prospective
Official Title: Understanding Hand Hygiene Behavior at Unidad Nacional Oncologia Pediatrica: A Focus Group Approach

Resource links provided by NLM:


Further study details as provided by St. Jude Children's Research Hospital:

Primary Outcome Measures:
  • Identify changes, if any, in hand hygiene following improvements identified during the focus group sessions aimed at increasing hand hygiene compliance of staff members. [ Time Frame: One (1) year ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
    The investigators propose to use already available hand hygiene practice surveillance and healthcare-associated infection documentation and obtain the healthcare professionals' opinions and experiences that affect the practice of hand hygiene to assess: (1) hand hygiene education and promotion; (2) access to hand hygiene supplies at the point of care; and (3) in other specific barriers to practice hand hygiene.


Secondary Outcome Measures:
  • Identify educational, motivational, and infrastructural issues that need to be addressed to increase hand hygiene practice compliance. [ Time Frame: One (1) year ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
    Focus group meetings and structured interviews with staff with be used to assess the issues to be addressed.


Enrollment: 55
Study Start Date: August 2011
Study Completion Date: July 2013
Primary Completion Date: July 2013 (Final data collection date for primary outcome measure)
Detailed Description:

Healthcare associated infections (HAI) are a concern in all parts of the world. Patients who are immune-compromised by chemotherapy, HIV/AIDS, or organ transplant are especially susceptible to infection. In addition to the opportunistic infections that these patients are at risk of acquiring, the emergence of methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus and vancomycin resistant Enterococcus species pose a risk to healthy individuals as well. Hand hygiene is one of the most important infection prevention practices for everyone in a hospital. In resource-poor countries, infection prevention and control programs are often neglected due to a lack of funding and organizational priorities. The Division of Infectious Diseases - International Outreach (ID-IO) has partnered with several hospitals in Latin America to mentor healthcare providers and provide key supplies so that they deliver the best care and prevent infection in units where the patients have the greatest risk of acquiring and dying from infections. Because of its importance, ID-IO has focused on hand hygiene as a building block for safe care at these hospitals; therefore, each year, at these hospitals, a hospital-wide education and promotion effort on hand hygiene is completed. The topics covered are general hospital hygiene, access to hand hygiene stations, and ensuring that adequate supplies for hand hygiene are available. Observation of hand hygiene practices before, during, and after bedside clinical activities shows there is a temporary improvement in compliance with current hand hygiene guidelines; however, the rates of compliance decline again as HAIs increase. In this study, the investigators propose to use already available hand hygiene practice surveillance and healthcare associated infection documentation and obtain the healthcare professionals' opinions and experiences that affect the practice of hand hygiene. Because motivation and barriers to practice hand hygiene derive from more than just education and adequate supplies, the investigators would like to understand the reasons why the healthcare providers do and do not practice hand hygiene when indicated. The methods to be used in this study are focus group meetings and structured interviews with staff of Unidad Nacional de Oncologia Pediatrica in Guatemala City, Guatemala.

  Eligibility

Genders Eligible for Study:   Both
Accepts Healthy Volunteers:   Yes
Sampling Method:   Probability Sample
Study Population

Health-care providers

Criteria

Inclusion Criteria:

  • Position held/job responsibilities of staff at Unidad Nacional de Oncologia Pediatrica in Guatemala City, Guatemala.

Exclusion Criteria:

  • Does not hold position or have job responsibilities at Unidad Nacional de Oncologia Pediatrica in Guatemala City, Guatemala.
  Contacts and Locations
Choosing to participate in a study is an important personal decision. Talk with your doctor and family members or friends about deciding to join a study. To learn more about this study, you or your doctor may contact the study research staff using the Contacts provided below. For general information, see Learn About Clinical Studies.

Please refer to this study by its ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT01419054

Locations
Guatemala
Unidad Nacional Oncologia Pediatrica
Guatemala, Guatemala, 01011
Sponsors and Collaborators
St. Jude Children's Research Hospital
Investigators
Study Chair: Kyle M. Johnson, PhD St. Jude Children's Research Hospital
  More Information

Additional Information:
No publications provided

Responsible Party: St. Jude Children's Research Hospital
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT01419054     History of Changes
Other Study ID Numbers: HHFG
Study First Received: August 15, 2011
Last Updated: November 21, 2013
Health Authority: United States: Institutional Review Board

ClinicalTrials.gov processed this record on August 28, 2014