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Disturbances in BCAA Metabolism and the Effects of Feeding and Exercise in COPD

This study has been completed.
Sponsor:
Collaborator:
European Dairy Association (EDA), Brussels
Information provided by:
Maastricht University Medical Center
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier:
NCT01418469
First received: August 9, 2011
Last updated: August 16, 2011
Last verified: August 2011
  Purpose

Studies on resting human muscle show that ingestion of the branched-chain amino acids (BCAA): leucine, valine and isoleucine have an anabolic effect on muscle protein metabolism. However, the effects of BCAA intake on protein metabolism during exercise are less clear. When BCAA were supplied as single amino acids, without other amino acids and/or carbohydrates, no effects were observed on protein kinetics. On the other hand, ingestion of BCAA during running appeared to reduce the catabolic effect of running on muscle protein metabolism. These experiments were all performed with mixtures of the BCAA with or without carbohydrates but not in the form of complete meals with food protein as a basis. Therefore, it is still unknown whether a protein meal, containing a substantial amount of BCAA is beneficial during exercise by inducing an anabolic effect.

Whey and Casein protein contain a substantial amount of BCAA in contrast to Soy protein. Therefore, it is hypothesized that milk-based proteins are a better and more physiological source of BCAA during exercise and will lead to more protein anabolism. Most of the available studies have been carried out in young and fit humans but there are hardly any data are available in the increasing population of the elderly. Therefore it is still unknown whether a BCAA rich protein meal can enhance the anabolic effect of exercise in older individuals.

Besides sarcopenia, a substantial part of the elderly is suffering from a chronic systemic disease such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). COPD represents an important health care problem. COPD is the fourth leading cause of death and will be the third leading cause worldwide in 2020. Besides the local impairment, COPD is a chronic wasting disease, associated with alterations in intermediary metabolism. Substantial disturbances have been found in BCAA (and related) metabolism in these patients at rest and during exercise. It might therefore be of clinical relevance to study the metabolic effects of BCAA rich protein meals in patients with COPD at rest and during exercise.


Condition Intervention
Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease
Dietary Supplement: Caseinate
Dietary Supplement: Whey protein isolate
Dietary Supplement: Soy
Dietary Supplement: soy+BCAA

Study Type: Interventional
Study Design: Allocation: Randomized
Endpoint Classification: Efficacy Study
Intervention Model: Crossover Assignment
Masking: Double Blind (Subject, Investigator)
Official Title: The Effects of Exercise on the Metabolic Fate of Branched Chain Amino Acids in Relation to Aging and Chronic Disease.

Resource links provided by NLM:


Further study details as provided by Maastricht University Medical Center:

Primary Outcome Measures:
  • Change in Net whole body protein synthesis [ Time Frame: 6 hours ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
    Net whole body protein synthesis during protein feeding and the response to a 20 min cycle exercise bout


Secondary Outcome Measures:
  • Change in whole body protein synthesis rate [ Time Frame: 6 hours ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
    Whole body protein synthesis rate during protein feeding and the response to 20 min cycle exercise bout

  • Change in Leucine turnover [ Time Frame: 6 hours ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
    Leucine turnover during protein feeding and the response to a 20 min cycle exercise bout

  • Change in Isoleucine turnover [ Time Frame: 6 hours ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
    Isoleucine turnover during protein feeding and the response to a 20 min cycle exercise bout

  • Change in Valine turnover [ Time Frame: 6 hours ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
    Valine turnover during protein feeding and the response to a 20 min cycle exercise bout

  • Change in plasma lactate concentration [ Time Frame: 6 hours ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
    Plasma lactate during protein feeding and the response to a 20 min cycle exercise bout

  • Change in NH3 concentration [ Time Frame: 6 hours ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
    Plasma NH3 during protein feeding and the response to a 20 min cycle exercise bout

  • Change in plasma amino acids concentrations [ Time Frame: 6 hours ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
    Plasma amino acid concentrations during protein feeding and the response to a 20 min cycle exercise bout

  • Splanchnic extraction of amino acids during protein feeding [ Time Frame: 6 hours ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
    Splanchnic extraction of amino acids during protein feeding and the response to a 20 min cycle exercise bout

  • Change in whole body protein breakdown rate [ Time Frame: 6 hours ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
    Whole body protein breakdown rate during protein feeding and the response to cycle exercise


Enrollment: 24
Study Start Date: December 2002
Study Completion Date: December 2004
Primary Completion Date: December 2003 (Final data collection date for primary outcome measure)
Arms Assigned Interventions
Experimental: Caseinate protein intake
18 mg protein/kg body weight caseinate and 46 mg maltodextrin / kg body weight per 20 min sip feeding
Dietary Supplement: Caseinate
18 mg protein/kg body weight caseinate and 46 mg maltodextrin / kg body weight per 20 min sip feeding
Other Name: casein
Experimental: Whey protein isolate intake
18 mg protein/kg body weight whey protein isolate and 46 mg maltodextrin / kg body weight per 20 min sip feeding
Dietary Supplement: Whey protein isolate
18 mg protein/kg body weight whey protein isolate and 46 mg maltodextrin / kg body weight per 20 min sip feeding
Other Name: Whey
Experimental: Soy protein intake
18 mg protein/kg body weight soy and 46 mg maltodextrin / kg body weight per 20 min sip feeding
Dietary Supplement: Soy
18 mg protein/kg body weight soy and 46 mg maltodextrin / kg body weight per 20 min sip feeding
Other Name: Soy
Experimental: soy+BCAA protein intake
18 mg protein/kg body weight soy+BCAA and 46 mg maltodextrin / kg body weight per 20 min sip feeding
Dietary Supplement: soy+BCAA
18 mg protein/kg body weight soy+BCAA and 46 mg maltodextrin / kg body weight per 20 min sip feeding
Other Name: Soy+BCAA

Detailed Description:

In this study we investigate whether milk based protein sources of BCAA (casein and whey proteins) are superior to soy protein in the stimulation of protein anabolism before, during and after cycle exercise in COPD and healthy elderly and young subjects, and whether adding BCAA to soy protein will increase protein anabolism in these subjects.

To investigate Leucine, Isoleucine and Valine metabolism during and after exercise in COPD and healthy subjects

  Eligibility

Ages Eligible for Study:   45 Years and older
Genders Eligible for Study:   Male
Accepts Healthy Volunteers:   Yes
Criteria

Inclusion Criteria:

  • Irreversible chronic airflow limitation (FEV1 <70% of predicted)
  • Clinically stable condition

Exclusion Criteria:

  • Oxygen supplementation
  • Respiratory tract infection or exacerbation of his disease at least 4 weeks prior to the study
  • Oral corticosteroids as maintenance medication
  • Other concomitant metabolic disease (ie malignancy, cardiac failure, recent surgery, severe endocrine, hepatic or renal disorder)
  Contacts and Locations
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Please refer to this study by its ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT01418469

Locations
Netherlands
Maastricht UMC
Maastricht, Netherlands
Sponsors and Collaborators
Maastricht University Medical Center
European Dairy Association (EDA), Brussels
Investigators
Principal Investigator: Nicolaas EP Deutz, MD, PhD University of Arkansas
  More Information

Publications:
Additional publications automatically indexed to this study by ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier (NCT Number):
Responsible Party: Nicolaas EP Deutz, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT01418469     History of Changes
Other Study ID Numbers: MEC 02-059.3
Study First Received: August 9, 2011
Last Updated: August 16, 2011
Health Authority: Netherlands: The Central Committee on Research Involving Human Subjects (CCMO)

Keywords provided by Maastricht University Medical Center:
COPD
protein metabolism
branched-chain amino acid metabolism
exercise
protein feeding

Additional relevant MeSH terms:
Lung Diseases
Lung Diseases, Obstructive
Pulmonary Disease, Chronic Obstructive
Respiratory Tract Diseases

ClinicalTrials.gov processed this record on November 20, 2014