The Effect of a Targeted Video Intervention on Beliefs Regarding Hypertension

This study has been completed.
Sponsor:
Collaborator:
American Academy of Family Physicians
Information provided by:
University of Pittsburgh
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier:
NCT01411956
First received: July 27, 2011
Last updated: August 5, 2011
Last verified: August 2011
  Purpose

Researchers have linked media messages such as television programs to multiple problematic health behaviors. The narrative style of many television programs—involving a plot, recurrent characters, entertaining situations, and familiar settings—makes them compelling and likely contributes to the powerful influence these programs can have on behavior. However, narrative messages are not frequently utilized for prosocial purposes. In particular, health education embedded in a narrative context has been neither commonly utilized nor carefully evaluated. Using constructs from two complementary theories of health behavior, family physicians in a large metropolitan region have developed a situation comedy entitled "White Coats" that aims to provide quality patient education. The program currently airs on a local public access channel. The objective of this project is to evaluate the effect of one particular episode of "White Coats" on patient beliefs regarding hypertension.


Condition Intervention
Hypertension
Other: 24-minute video episode of patient education TV sitcom "White Coats"
Other: Placebo video

Study Type: Interventional
Study Design: Allocation: Randomized
Intervention Model: Parallel Assignment
Masking: Double Blind (Subject, Investigator, Outcomes Assessor)
Official Title: The Effect of a Targeted Video Intervention on Beliefs Regarding Hypertension

Resource links provided by NLM:


Further study details as provided by University of Pittsburgh:

Primary Outcome Measures:
  • Change in Likert scale agreement with Perceived severity questionnaire statement from immediately pre-intervention to immediately post-intervention and also 2 months post-intervention [ Time Frame: immediately pre-intervention, immediately post-intervention, and 2 months post-intervention ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
    Participants ranked their agreement with the following statement on an 8-point Likert scale: "If you have high blood pressure, controlling your blood pressure is important."

  • Change in Likert scale agreement with Perceived susceptibility questionnaire statement from immediately pre-intervention to immediately post-intervention and also 2 months post-intervention [ Time Frame: immediately pre-intervention, immediately post-intervention, and 2 months post-intervention ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
    Participants ranked their agreement with the following statement on an 8-point Likert scale: "People don't need to worry about having high blood pressure if they don't have any symptoms (like headaches, chest pain, or blurry vision)."

  • Change in Likert scale agreement with Perceived barriers to change questionnaire statement from immediately pre-intervention to immediately post-intervention and also 2 months post-intervention [ Time Frame: immediately pre-intervention, immediately post-intervention, and 2 months post-intervention ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
    Participants ranked their agreement with the following statement on an 8-point Likert scale: "I can find time to exercise."

  • Change in Likert scale agreement with self-efficacy questionnaire statement from immediately pre-intervention to immediately post-intervention and also 2 months post-intervention [ Time Frame: immediately pre-intervention, immediately post-intervention, and 2 months post-intervention ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
    Participants ranked their agreement with the following statement on an 8-point Likert scale: "I can read food labels to look for high salt foods when I buy groceries."

  • Change in Likert scale agreement with Outcome efficacy questionnaire statement from immediately pre-intervention to immediately post-intervention and also 2 months post-intervention [ Time Frame: immediately pre-intervention, immediately post-intervention, and 2 months post-intervention ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
    Participants ranked their agreement with the following statement on an 8-point Likert scale: "If you have high blood pressure and take your medicines, you can lower your chance of having a heart attack."


Enrollment: 43
Study Start Date: October 2009
Study Completion Date: January 2010
Primary Completion Date: January 2010 (Final data collection date for primary outcome measure)
Arms Assigned Interventions
Experimental: Treatment Group
This group viewed the intervention video, a 24-minute episode of the sitcom "White Coats," deliberately scripted with the five health behavior theory constructs we are testing.
Other: 24-minute video episode of patient education TV sitcom "White Coats"
The series features a fictional married couple of Family Medicine physicians who work in the same practice, located in our community. In both their professional and private lives and, in moments both humorous and serious, these doctors teach patients about a wide variety of health topics. The intervention episode addressing hypertension will focus on three different patient-physician plot lines, which were developed to specifically address each of the beliefs about hypertension highlighted in the theoretical model (susceptibility, seriousness, barriers, self-efficacy and outcome efficacy.).
Placebo Comparator: Control Group
The control group viewed a 25-minute video on an unrelated subject (depression).
Other: Placebo video
The control group watched a 25-minute patient education video on depression.

  Show Detailed Description

  Eligibility

Ages Eligible for Study:   18 Years to 65 Years
Genders Eligible for Study:   Both
Accepts Healthy Volunteers:   Yes
Criteria

Inclusion Criteria: age between 18 and 65, along with one or more of the following

  • ever told by a physician that you have hypertension
  • family history of hypertension
  • current stress
  • BMI over 30
  • current smoker
  • inactive/sedentary lifestyle (defined as less than 150 minutes of exercise a week)

Exclusion Criteria:

  • age under 18 or over 65
  Contacts and Locations
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Please refer to this study by its ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT01411956

Sponsors and Collaborators
University of Pittsburgh
American Academy of Family Physicians
Investigators
Principal Investigator: Jennifer L Middleton, MD MPH FAAFP University of Pittsburgh Department of Family Medicine
  More Information

No publications provided

Responsible Party: Jennifer L. Middleton, MD, MPH, FAAFP, University of Pittsburgh Department of Family Medicine
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT01411956     History of Changes
Other Study ID Numbers: G0804
Study First Received: July 27, 2011
Last Updated: August 5, 2011
Health Authority: United States: Institutional Review Board

Keywords provided by University of Pittsburgh:
Health Behavior Theory
Patient Education
Hypertension
Health beliefs related to hypertension and hypertension treatment

Additional relevant MeSH terms:
Hypertension
Vascular Diseases
Cardiovascular Diseases

ClinicalTrials.gov processed this record on July 23, 2014