Exercise as Alcohol Use Disorders Intervention for Non-Treatment Seeking Adults

This study has been completed.
Sponsor:
Collaborators:
University of Connecticut
Information provided by (Responsible Party):
Jeremiah Weinstock, St. Louis University
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier:
NCT01399554
First received: July 19, 2011
Last updated: April 4, 2014
Last verified: April 2014
  Purpose

Alcohol use disorders are common and few individuals with the disorder ever seek help. This study proposes to intervene in a novel way - exercise, as it has many mental and physical health benefits and is an activity that is incompatible with simultaneous alcohol use. If effective, this non-stigmatizing intervention may increase the utility and acceptability of interventions for alcohol use disorders and ultimately increase the number of individuals effectively treated.


Condition Intervention Phase
Alcohol-Related Disorders
Behavioral: Motivational Enhancement Therapy plus Contingency Management
Phase 1

Study Type: Interventional
Study Design: Allocation: Randomized
Endpoint Classification: Efficacy Study
Intervention Model: Parallel Assignment
Masking: Open Label
Primary Purpose: Treatment
Official Title: Exercise as Alcohol Use Disorders Intervention for Non-Treatment Seeking Adults

Resource links provided by NLM:


Further study details as provided by St. Louis University:

Primary Outcome Measures:
  • Monthly drinking frequency [ Time Frame: Six months ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]

Secondary Outcome Measures:
  • Monthly Exercise Behavior [ Time Frame: Six months ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]

Enrollment: 38
Study Start Date: April 2011
Study Completion Date: August 2013
Primary Completion Date: August 2013 (Final data collection date for primary outcome measure)
Arms Assigned Interventions
No Intervention: Assessment Only
Experimental: Weekly Exercise Counseling Intervention Behavioral: Motivational Enhancement Therapy plus Contingency Management
A combination of two motivational enhancement therapy (MET) sessions focused on increasing exercise spaced two months apart and four months of weekly contingency management (CM) for adhering to specific exercise activities. MET is a client-centered, directive method of enhancing intrinsic motivation to change by exploring and resolving ambivalence, and CM is a behavioral treatment offering individuals tangible reinforcers such as prizes for completion of specific target behaviors.
Other Names:
  • MET
  • CM

Detailed Description:

About 26 million Americans (8.5%) meet criteria for an alcohol use disorder (AUD; i.e., abuse or dependence), and most with an AUD will not ever seek help. A variety of reasons exist for not seeking help, with stigma and desire to handle the problem on one's own being primary among them. Therefore, offering interventions for AUD that do not stigmatize or require an individual to see a mental health professional may increase the utility and acceptability of AUD interventions and ultimately increase the number of individuals effectively treated. This pilot study evaluates exercise as an AUD intervention. Exercise has been proposed as a potential treatment for AUD due to its numerous mental and physical health benefits. Thirty sedentary non-treatment seeking AUD individuals to be recruited from the community via advertisements. Participants will be given a four month YMCA gym membership and will be randomized to one of two conditions: (1) assessment only (AO), or (2) a combination of two motivational enhancement therapy (MET) sessions focused on increasing exercise spaced two months apart and four months of weekly contingency management (CM) for adhering to specific exercise activities. MET is a client-centered, directive method of enhancing intrinsic motivation to change by exploring and resolving ambivalence, and CM is a behavioral treatment offering individuals tangible reinforcers such as prizes for completion of specific target behaviors. Assessments of all participants will take place at baseline, 2-months (mid-treatment), and 4-months (post-treatment. Results from this pilot study will guide future investigations of exercise as a method for intervening with non-treatment seeking AUD individuals.

  Eligibility

Ages Eligible for Study:   21 Years to 55 Years
Genders Eligible for Study:   Both
Accepts Healthy Volunteers:   No
Criteria

Inclusion Criteria:

  • Age 21-55 years
  • English speaking
  • Sedentary
  • Alcohol-related problems
  • Recent heavy drinking episodes
  • Blood pressure <165/95 mmHg

Exclusion Criteria:

  • Currently receiving or desiring treatment for alcohol problems
  • Contraindications for exercise
  • Acute psychiatric problems that require immediate treatment
  • Obese - class II
  • Pregnant or desire to become so in the next several months
  • Other substance dependence
  • In recovery for pathological gambling
  Contacts and Locations
Choosing to participate in a study is an important personal decision. Talk with your doctor and family members or friends about deciding to join a study. To learn more about this study, you or your doctor may contact the study research staff using the Contacts provided below. For general information, see Learn About Clinical Studies.

Please refer to this study by its ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT01399554

Locations
United States, Missouri
Saint Louis University
St. Louis, Missouri, United States, 63103
Sponsors and Collaborators
St. Louis University
University of Connecticut
  More Information

No publications provided

Responsible Party: Jeremiah Weinstock, Assistant Professor, St. Louis University
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT01399554     History of Changes
Other Study ID Numbers: 1R03AA020194, 1R03AA020194
Study First Received: July 19, 2011
Last Updated: April 4, 2014
Health Authority: United States: Institutional Review Board
United States: Federal Government

Additional relevant MeSH terms:
Alcohol-Related Disorders
Disease
Chemically-Induced Disorders
Mental Disorders
Pathologic Processes
Substance-Related Disorders

ClinicalTrials.gov processed this record on October 20, 2014