Influence Continuous Veno-venous Hemodialysis the Autoregulation (dARICUCVVH)

This study has been completed.
Sponsor:
Information provided by (Responsible Party):
Patrick Schramm, Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier:
NCT01376531
First received: June 15, 2011
Last updated: April 12, 2013
Last verified: April 2013
  Purpose

The aim of the study is to characterize the influence of continuous veno-venous hemodialysis on the cerebrovascular autoregulation.


Condition Intervention
Acute Renal Failure
Procedure: continuous veno-venous hemodialysis

Study Type: Observational
Study Design: Time Perspective: Prospective
Official Title: Influence of Continuous Veno-venous Hemodialysis on Cerebrovascular Autoregulation in Patients With Acute Renal Failure

Resource links provided by NLM:


Further study details as provided by Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz:

Primary Outcome Measures:
  • Change from Baseline cerebrovascular autoregulation to cerebrovascular autoregulation during continuous veno-venous hemodialysis [ Time Frame: 1 Year ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
    Is there an influence of continuous veno-venous hemodialysis at the cerebrovascular autoregulation, which would be a side effect with limiting use in patients with brain injury or the need of intensive monitoring of cerebral perfusion pressure in this patients.


Enrollment: 20
Study Start Date: January 2011
Study Completion Date: June 2011
Primary Completion Date: June 2011 (Final data collection date for primary outcome measure)
Groups/Cohorts Assigned Interventions
acute renal failure
patients at intensive care unit with definition of acute renal failure and the need for continuous veno-venous hemodialysis
Procedure: continuous veno-venous hemodialysis
continuous veno-venous hemodialysis
Other Name: CVVHD

Detailed Description:

Patients at the intensive care unit who suffered acute renal failure with the need of continuous veno-venous hemodialysis will be investigated with continuous veno-venous hemodialysis and in a time window without continuous veno-venous hemodialysis to investigate the influence of continuous veno-venous hemodialysis on the cerebrovascular autoregulation.

  Eligibility

Ages Eligible for Study:   18 Years and older
Genders Eligible for Study:   Both
Accepts Healthy Volunteers:   No
Sampling Method:   Probability Sample
Study Population

Patients at ICU with acute renal failure and the need of continuos veno-venous hemodialysis

Criteria

Inclusion Criteria:

  • acute renal failure
  • need for continuous veno-venous hemodialysis
  • age >18 Years

Exclusion Criteria:

  • Sepsis
  • Preexisting cerebral illness
  • traumatic brain injury
  • Meningitis or encephalitis
  • Pregnancy
  Contacts and Locations
Choosing to participate in a study is an important personal decision. Talk with your doctor and family members or friends about deciding to join a study. To learn more about this study, you or your doctor may contact the study research staff using the Contacts provided below. For general information, see Learn About Clinical Studies.

Please refer to this study by its ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT01376531

Locations
Germany
University medical centre
Mainz, Germany, 55131
Sponsors and Collaborators
Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz
Investigators
Principal Investigator: Patrick Schramm, MD Department of Anesthesiology, University medicine Mainz, Germany
  More Information

Publications:
Responsible Party: Patrick Schramm, Senior Physician, Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT01376531     History of Changes
Other Study ID Numbers: 837.041.10 2
Study First Received: June 15, 2011
Last Updated: April 12, 2013
Health Authority: Germany: Ethics Commission

Keywords provided by Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz:
acute renal failure
cerebrovascular autoregulation
transcranial Doppler
continuous veno-venous hemodialysis

Additional relevant MeSH terms:
Acute Kidney Injury
Renal Insufficiency
Kidney Diseases
Urologic Diseases

ClinicalTrials.gov processed this record on July 20, 2014