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Internet Cognitive Behavior Therapy (CBT) for Obsessive Compulsive Disorder (OCD)

The recruitment status of this study is unknown because the information has not been verified recently.
Verified September 2010 by Karolinska Institutet.
Recruitment status was  Active, not recruiting
Sponsor:
Information provided by:
Karolinska Institutet
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier:
NCT01348529
First received: November 8, 2010
Last updated: May 4, 2011
Last verified: September 2010
  Purpose

The main aim of this study is to test whether cognitive behavior therapy could be effective in treating obsessive compulsive disorder. Here, the investigators test the in group effects of a 15 week long treatment delivered via the Internet for residents in Stockholm County.


Condition Intervention
Obsessive Compulsive Disorder
Behavioral: Internet CBT

Study Type: Interventional
Study Design: Allocation: Non-Randomized
Endpoint Classification: Efficacy Study
Intervention Model: Single Group Assignment
Masking: Open Label
Primary Purpose: Treatment
Official Title: Internet-based Cognitive Behavior Therapy for Obsessive Compulsive Disorder: A Pilot Study

Resource links provided by NLM:


Further study details as provided by Karolinska Institutet:

Primary Outcome Measures:
  • Change from Baseline of obsessions and compulsions after 15 weeks and 6 months after treatment. [ Time Frame: Psychiatrist visit at baseline, after 15 weeks of treatment and 6 months after treatment. ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
    Yale Brown Obsessive Compulsive Scale (Y‐BOCS)


Secondary Outcome Measures:
  • Change from Baseline of cost data after 15 weeks and 6 months after treatment. [ Time Frame: Self-ratings at baseline, after 15 weeks of treatment and 6 months after treatment. ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
    "Trimbos and Institute of Medical Technology Assessment Cost Questionnaire for Psychiatry". In this questionnaire, patients register their monthly health care consumption (e.g. GP visits) as well as time spent in informal health enhancing activities (e.g. self-help groups and informal care from friends). In addition, work loss and work cutback both at work and in the domestic realm is measured.

  • Change from Baseline of depressive symptoms after 15 weeks and 6 months after treatment. [ Time Frame: Sel-ratings at baseline, after 15 weeks of treatment and 6 months after treatment. ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
    The Montgomery Åsberg Depression Rating Scale

  • Change from Baseline of obsessions and compulsions after 15 weeks and 6 months after treatment. [ Time Frame: Self-ratings at baseline, after 15 weeks of treatment and at 6 months after treatment. ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
    Obsessions and Compulsions Inventory Revised

  • Change from Baseline of quality of life after 15 weeks and 6 months after treatment [ Time Frame: Self-ratings at baseline, after 15 weeks of treatment and at 6 months after treatment. ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
    EuroQol

  • Change from Baseline of quality of life after 15 weeks and 6 months after treatment [ Time Frame: Self-ratings at baseline, after 15 weeks of treatment and at 6 months after treatment. ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
    Quality of life inventory


Estimated Enrollment: 24
Study Start Date: September 2010
Estimated Primary Completion Date: May 2011 (Final data collection date for primary outcome measure)
Arms Assigned Interventions
Experimental: Internet CBT
Internet-delivered cognitive behavioral therapy with therapist support.
Behavioral: Internet CBT
Internet-delivered cognitive behavioral therapy with therapist support.

  Eligibility

Ages Eligible for Study:   18 Years and older
Genders Eligible for Study:   Both
Accepts Healthy Volunteers:   No
Criteria

Inclusion Criteria:

  • Diagnosed with Obsessive compulsive disorder according to the DSM criteria
  • Be at least 18 years old
  • YBOCS >7

Exclusion Criteria:

  • other primary diagnosis
  • substance abuse,
  • psychosis,
  • bipolar disorder,
  • suicidal ideation,
  • adjusted pharmacological treatment the last two months
  • current psychological treatment for OCD,
  • been treated with CBT the last two years,
  • serious somatic disease,
  • Y--‐BOCS>31
  • hoarding as primary OCD subtype
  Contacts and Locations
Choosing to participate in a study is an important personal decision. Talk with your doctor and family members or friends about deciding to join a study. To learn more about this study, you or your doctor may contact the study research staff using the Contacts provided below. For general information, see Learn About Clinical Studies.

Please refer to this study by its ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT01348529

Locations
Sweden
Internetpsykatrienheten, M46, Psykiatri sydväst
Stockholm, Sweden, SE-141 86
Sponsors and Collaborators
Karolinska Institutet
  More Information

Additional Information:
No publications provided by Karolinska Institutet

Additional publications automatically indexed to this study by ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier (NCT Number):
Responsible Party: Christian Rück, MD, PhD, Study Principal Investigator, Karolinska Institutet, Sweden
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT01348529     History of Changes
Other Study ID Numbers: OCDP1
Study First Received: November 8, 2010
Last Updated: May 4, 2011
Health Authority: Sweden: Regional Ethical Review Board

Keywords provided by Karolinska Institutet:
OCD
CBT
Reducing OCD symptoms

Additional relevant MeSH terms:
Compulsive Personality Disorder
Disease
Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder
Anxiety Disorders
Mental Disorders
Pathologic Processes
Personality Disorders

ClinicalTrials.gov processed this record on November 24, 2014