Team COOL Pilot Study

This study has been completed.
Sponsor:
Information provided by:
University of Minnesota - Clinical and Translational Science Institute
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier:
NCT01315743
First received: March 14, 2011
Last updated: NA
Last verified: March 2011
History: No changes posted
  Purpose

The goal of this exploratory pilot study was to develop and test the acceptability and feasibility of an innovative alternative high school-based intervention to prevent further weight gain and/or promote weight loss among a sample of ethnically and economically diverse adolescents.


Condition Intervention Phase
Multicomponent School-based Behavioral Intervention
Pilot Study to Prevent Further Weight Gain and/or Promote
Weight Loss Among Adolescents.
Behavioral: Team COOL
Phase 1
Phase 2

Study Type: Interventional
Study Design: Intervention Model: Single Group Assignment
Primary Purpose: Health Services Research
Official Title: Team COOL Pilot Study

Resource links provided by NLM:


Further study details as provided by University of Minnesota - Clinical and Translational Science Institute:

Estimated Enrollment: 50
Study Start Date: March 2007
Study Completion Date: March 2009
Primary Completion Date: March 2009 (Final data collection date for primary outcome measure)
Arms Assigned Interventions
Experimental: Intervention Behavioral: Team COOL
1) a classroom-based experiential curriculum that incorporated school, family and community-linked activities to promote physical activity, healthy eating and limited television viewing, 2) environmental modifications of food and beverage offerings and physical activity opportunities at school and 3) a teacher-guided, youth-directed health advisory council to promote and support physical activity, healthy eating and limited television viewing.

Detailed Description:

The goal of this exploratory pilot study was to develop and test the acceptability and feasibility of an innovative alternative high school-based intervention to prevent further weight gain and/or promote weight loss among a sample of ethnically and economically diverse adolescents. The proposed study will use a group randomized trial design and target boys and girls, ages 15-20 years old, attending six alternative high schools in the Minneapolis-St Paul metropolitan area. Alternative high schools are public or private schools that offer a nontraditional educational experience for at-risk students, such as dropouts, expelled students, truants and hard to reach learners who have not succeeded in regular school systems. Although low levels of physical activity (PA) and unhealthy dietary practices, behaviors regarded as a primary cause of the overweight/obesity epidemic among youth, are prevalent among teens attending alternative schools, school-based programs targeting these behaviors have not been tested and evaluated.

Three schools were randomized to the intervention/treatment condition and three schools to a minimal intervention/comparison condition. Social Cognitive Theory and ecological theory provided the theoretical basis for the multi-component intervention, which included 1) a classroom-based experiential curriculum that incorporated school, family and community-linked activities to promote physical activity, healthy eating and limited television viewing, 2) environmental modifications of food and beverage offerings and physical activity opportunities at school and 3) a teacher-guided, youth-directed health advisory council to promote and support physical activity, healthy eating and limited television viewing.

Student and school-level measurements were taken at baseline, 6 months post randomization and at the completion of the 18 month intervention. Student-level measures included a self-administered psychosocial survey, the 3-day Previous Day Physical Activity Report and moderate-to-vigorous physical activity levels of students as measured by an Actigraph accelerometer. School-level measures assessed the availability of physical activity opportunities and healthy foods at school.

Hypothesis: Adolescents attending alternative high schools will report high participation rates and a high degree of satisfaction with a multi-component school-based intervention targeting students' PA, diet and TV viewing practices.

  Eligibility

Ages Eligible for Study:   14 Years to 21 Years
Genders Eligible for Study:   Both
Accepts Healthy Volunteers:   Yes
Criteria

Inclusion Criteria:

Because this research is a group randomized trial, eligibility criteria were based primarily on school characteristics rather than student characteristics. Schools eligible for recruitment were required to: 1) identify as either an area learning center (ALC), alternative learning program (ALP) or contracted alternative, 2) be open year around (a requirement for all state ALCs; an option for ALPs), 3) enroll 11th and 12th grade students, 4) project a September 2006 enrollment of 75 students, 5) require student attendance on campus at least 10 hours/week and 6) have access to an indoor facility for physical activity. Therefore, all students attending a participating school were eligible to take part in the study and exclusion will occur only in case of parental or student denial of consent. Students and parents/guardians of students who were not fluent in English were not included in measurement.

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Exclusion Criteria: Alternative programs that serve primarily pregnant and disabled teens or function exclusively as day treatment programs for juvenile offenders were not eligible to participate in this study.Students and parents/guardians of students who were not fluent in English were not included in measurement.

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  Contacts and Locations
Choosing to participate in a study is an important personal decision. Talk with your doctor and family members or friends about deciding to join a study. To learn more about this study, you or your doctor may contact the study research staff using the Contacts provided below. For general information, see Learn About Clinical Studies.

No Contacts or Locations Provided
  More Information

No publications provided by University of Minnesota - Clinical and Translational Science Institute

Additional publications automatically indexed to this study by ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier (NCT Number):
Responsible Party: M Kubik, University of Minnesota
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT01315743     History of Changes
Other Study ID Numbers: jjj
Study First Received: March 14, 2011
Last Updated: March 14, 2011
Health Authority: United States: Institutional Review Board

Additional relevant MeSH terms:
Weight Gain
Weight Loss
Body Weight Changes
Body Weight
Signs and Symptoms

ClinicalTrials.gov processed this record on July 24, 2014