A Safety and Efficacy Study of Oral Tapentadol Extended-Release in Japanese Participants

This study has been completed.
Sponsor:
Information provided by (Responsible Party):
Janssen Pharmaceutical K.K.
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier:
NCT01309386
First received: February 17, 2011
Last updated: February 8, 2013
Last verified: February 2013
  Purpose

The purpose of this study is to evaluate the conversion rate based on the number of participants achieving pain control and safety within 1 week after switching the opioid (morphine-like medications) analgesics (drug used to control pain), when tapentadol extended-release (ER) (JNS024ER) is orally administered to participants treated with around-the-clock opioid analgesics, for their moderate to severe (very serious, life threatening) chronic (lasting a long time) malignant (cancerous) tumor-related (a mass in a specific area) cancer (abnormal tissue that grows and spreads in the body) pain.


Condition Intervention Phase
Neoplasms
Drug: Tapentadol ER
Drug: Morphine SR
Phase 3

Study Type: Interventional
Study Design: Allocation: Randomized
Endpoint Classification: Safety/Efficacy Study
Intervention Model: Parallel Assignment
Masking: Open Label
Primary Purpose: Treatment
Official Title: A Randomized, Open-Label, Parallel-Arm, Optimal Dose-Titration, Multicenter Study to Evaluate the Safety and Efficacy of Oral JNS024 Extended-Release (ER) in Japanese Subjects Treated With Around-the-Clock Opioid Analgesics for Their Moderate to Severe Chronic Malignant Tumor- Related Cancer Pain

Resource links provided by NLM:


Further study details as provided by Janssen Pharmaceutical K.K.:

Primary Outcome Measures:
  • Percentage of Participants Who Achieved Pain Control [ Time Frame: Week 1 ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
    Pain control was considered to be achieved for participants who met both of the following criteria for any consecutive 3 days during the first week of treatment period: a) Change from baseline of mean 24 hour numerical rating scale (NRS) (an 11-point NRS is used to measure the pain level where 0=no pain to 10=pain as bad as you can imagine) score less than +1.5, and b) when the frequency of rescue medication was twice or less per day.


Secondary Outcome Measures:
  • Change From Baseline in Numerical Rating Scale (NRS) at Week 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7 and 8 [ Time Frame: Baseline, Week 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8 ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
    Average pain intensity was assessed using an 11-point NRS to measure the pain level for the past 24-hours where 0=no pain to 10=pain as bad as you can imagine.

  • Number of Participants Who Discontinued Study Treatment Due to Lack of Efficacy [ Time Frame: Baseline up to Week 8 ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
    Number of participants who discontinued the treatment due to lack of efficacy were assessed throughout the study.

  • Number of Participants With Patient Global Impression of Change (PGIC) [ Time Frame: Week 1, 4 and 8 ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
    The PGIC is a single-item questionnaire designed to provide an overall assessment of treatment from the participant's perspective since the start of the study. It is measured on a 7-point scale, where 1=very much improved and 7=very much worse. A participant is considered a responder if they have a response of "very much improved" or "much improved".

  • Total Number of Days of Rescue Medication Over Time [ Time Frame: Baseline up to Week 8 ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
    Total number of days of rescue medication over time were assessed. Rescue medications are medicines that are administered to the participants when the efficacy of the study drug is not satisfactory, or the effect of the study drug is too great and is likely to cause a hazard to the participant, or to manage an emergency situation. Supplemental analgesics (drug used to control pain) were used as rescue medication.

  • Number of Doses of Rescue Medication Over Time [ Time Frame: Baseline up to Week 8 ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
    Number of doses of rescue medication over time were assessed. Rescue medications are medicines that are administered to the participants when the efficacy of the study drug is not satisfactory, or the effect of the study drug is too great and is likely to cause a hazard to the participant, or to manage an emergency situation. Supplemental analgesics (drug used to control pain) were used as rescue medication.

  • Average Change From Baseline in Amount of Rescue Medication Over Time [ Time Frame: Baseline, Week 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8 ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
    Rescue medications are medicines that are administered to the participants when the efficacy of the study drug is not satisfactory, or the effect of the study drug is too great and is likely to cause a hazard to the participant, or to manage an emergency situation. Supplemental analgesics (drug used to control pain) were used as rescue medication. Average amount was the averages of all doses recorded during the baseline period or during each week (Week 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7 and 8).


Enrollment: 100
Study Start Date: August 2010
Study Completion Date: January 2012
Primary Completion Date: January 2012 (Final data collection date for primary outcome measure)
Arms Assigned Interventions
Experimental: Tapentadol ER
Tapentadol extended-release (ER) (JNS024ER) oral tablets 100 to 400 milligram (mg) daily for 8 weeks (maximum dose could be up to 500 mg daily), as per Investigator's discretion.
Drug: Tapentadol ER
Tapentadol ER 100 to 400 milligram (mg) orally daily for 8 weeks (maximum up to 500 mg daily), as per Investigator's discretion.
Active Comparator: Morphine SR
Morphine sustained-release (SR) oral tablets 30 to 120 mg daily for 8 weeks (maximum dose could be up to 140 mg daily), as per Investigator's discretion.
Drug: Morphine SR
Morphine SR 30 to 120 mg orally daily for 8 weeks (maximum up to 140 mg daily), as per Investigator's discretion.

Detailed Description:

This is a randomized (study drug assigned by chance), open-label (a medical research study in which participants and researchers are told which treatments the participants are receiving, "unblinded"), parallel-arm (participants receive 1 of 2 possible interventions during the same time frame throughout the study), optimal dose-titration, multicenter (when more than one hospital or medical school team work on a medical research study) study evaluating the conversion rate based on the number of participants achieving pain control and safety within 1 week after switching from an ongoing around-the-clock opioid analgesic (morphine sustained-release [SR], oxycodone controlled-release, or fentanyl transdermal) to tapentadol ER or morphine SR, for their moderate to severe chronic, malignant tumor-related cancer pain. The study consists of 2 periods: 1 to 2 week screening period, followed by 8-week open-label treatment period. During the study period, participants will be hospitalized or outpatient. However, it is preferable to be hospitalized 1 week before and 1 week after to evaluate efficacy before and after switching opioids for securing participants' safety. At Day 1, participants will receive either tapentadol ER or morphine SR twice daily. During the treatment period, the dose of the study drug will be titrated to the participant's optimal dose. The participants will receive either tapentadol ER or morphine SR twice daily for 8 weeks. The maximum dose allowed for tapentadol ER will be 500 milligram (mg) daily or morphine SR 140 mg daily throughout the study. Efficacy is primarily evaluated using pain intensity score on an 11 point Numerical Rating Scale (an 11-point NRS is used to measure the pain level where 0=no pain to 10=pain as bad as you can imagine). Participants' safety will also be monitored.

  Eligibility

Ages Eligible for Study:   20 Years and older
Genders Eligible for Study:   Both
Accepts Healthy Volunteers:   No
Criteria

Inclusion Criteria:

  • Participants with documented clinical diagnosis (determination of the cause of a medical problem) of any type of cancer (abnormal tissue that grows and spreads in the body)
  • Participants with mean 24-hour Numerical Rating Scale (NRS) score (11-point NRS used to measure the pain level for the past 24-hours where 0=no pain to 10=pain as bad as you can imagine) during 3 days (Day -4 to Day -2) before randomization (study drug assigned by chance) less than 4.0
  • Women must be post-menopausal, surgically sterile, or before entry and throughout the study practicing an effective method of birth control
  • Participants using immediate-release (IR) morphine hydrochloride (HCl) or oxycodone HCl hydrate as rescue medication (rescue medications are medicines that may be administered to the participants when the efficacy of the study drug is not satisfactory, or the effect of the study drug is too great and is likely to cause a hazard to the participant, or to manage an emergency situation) for breakthrough pain
  • Participants treated with around-the-clock opioid (morphine-like medications) therapy for moderate to severe (very serious, life threatening) chronic (lasting a long time), malignant (cancerous) tumor-related (a mass in a specific area) cancer (abnormal tissue that grows and spreads in the body) pain using one of the following opioid analgesics (drug used to control pain) before randomization: morphine SR tablet less than or equal to 120 milligram (mg) per day, oxycodone hydrochloride controlled release (CR) tablet: 15 mg to 80 mg per day, durotep MT (fentanyl transdermal [through the skin] matrix) patch less than or equal to 8.4 mg per patch, fentos tape less than or equal to 4 mg per tape, or oneduro patch less than or equal to 3.4 mg per patch

Exclusion Criteria:

  • Participants with complicated uncontrolled/clinically significant arrhythmia (uneven heart beat)
  • Participants who had received rescue doses 3 times or more daily within 3 days (Day -4 to Day -2) before the randomization
  • History of surgery intended for the cure of the primary disease or for the treatment of cancer pain within 28 days before screening
  • Participants who had application of radiotherapy (treatment of cancer using x-rays), nerve block, or stimulation analgesia within 7 days before screening
  • Participants with known allergies (over sensitivity to a substance), hypersensitivity, or intolerance to opioid analgesics or its excipients
  Contacts and Locations
Choosing to participate in a study is an important personal decision. Talk with your doctor and family members or friends about deciding to join a study. To learn more about this study, you or your doctor may contact the study research staff using the Contacts provided below. For general information, see Learn About Clinical Studies.

Please refer to this study by its ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT01309386

Locations
Japan
Chiba, Japan
Hamamatsu, Japan
Ibaraki, Japan
Kanagawa, Japan
Katsushika, Japan
Kobe, Japan
Kumamoto, Japan
Matsumoto, Japan
Matsumoto-City, Japan
Matsuyama, Japan
Matsuyama N/A, Japan
Nagasaki, Japan
Nagoya, Japan
Nishinomiya, Japan
Ohmura, Japan
Ohta, Japan
Osaka, Japan
Saga, Japan
Sapporo, Japan
Tokyo, Japan
Toyama, Japan
Toyohashi, Japan
Toyohashi N/A, Japan
Utsunomiya, Japan
Yokohama, Japan
Sponsors and Collaborators
Janssen Pharmaceutical K.K.
Investigators
Study Director: Janssen Pharmaceutical K.K. Clinical Trial Janssen Pharmaceutical K.K.
  More Information

No publications provided

Responsible Party: Janssen Pharmaceutical K.K.
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT01309386     History of Changes
Other Study ID Numbers: CR017326, JNS024ER-JPN-C03
Study First Received: February 17, 2011
Results First Received: February 8, 2013
Last Updated: February 8, 2013
Health Authority: Japan: Pharmaceuticals and Medical Devices Agency

Keywords provided by Janssen Pharmaceutical K.K.:
Tapentadol
Tumor related pain
Opioid
Cancer related pain
Morphine

Additional relevant MeSH terms:
Neoplasms
Morphine
Analgesics, Opioid
Narcotics
Central Nervous System Depressants
Physiological Effects of Drugs
Pharmacologic Actions
Analgesics
Sensory System Agents
Peripheral Nervous System Agents
Central Nervous System Agents
Therapeutic Uses

ClinicalTrials.gov processed this record on July 31, 2014