Effects of Routine Feedback to Clinicians on Youth Mental Health Outcomes: A Randomized Cluster Design

This study has been completed.
Sponsor:
Collaborators:
Leon Lowenstein Foundation
Information provided by:
Vanderbilt University
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier:
NCT01308879
First received: March 2, 2011
Last updated: March 3, 2011
Last verified: March 2011
  Purpose

The purpose of this clinical trial was to test the hypothesis that clients of clinicians who were scheduled to receive weekly feedback on their clients' progress would improve faster than clients of clinicians who were not scheduled to receive weekly feedback.


Condition Intervention
Mental Health Wellness 1
Psychosocial Problem
Behavioral: Contextualized Feedback Systems (CFS)tm

Study Type: Interventional
Study Design: Allocation: Randomized
Endpoint Classification: Efficacy Study
Intervention Model: Parallel Assignment
Masking: Open Label
Primary Purpose: Health Services Research
Official Title: Effects of Routine Feedback to Clinicians on Youth Mental Health Outcomes: A Randomized Cluster Design

Resource links provided by NLM:


Further study details as provided by Vanderbilt University:

Primary Outcome Measures:
  • Symptoms and Functioning Severity Scale [ Time Frame: The SFSS is completed at intake by youths and caregivers, then by youths, caregivers, and clinicians at the 1st treatment session and every other session (week) thereafter for as long as the youth is enrolled in the intervention (CFS). ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
    The SFSS is part of a battery of clinical measures (Peabody Treatment Progress Battery:PTPB) developed by the researchers. It assesses change in closely-timed repeated measurements. Parallel forms are completed by youths, caregivers, and clinicians at the end of treatment sessions. The SFSS includes 32 items that ask the respondent to rate how frequently in the last two weeks the youth experienced emotions or exhibited behaviors linked to typical mental health disorders for youths (e.g., ADHD, conduct disorder, depression).


Secondary Outcome Measures:
  • Brief Multidimensional Students' Life Satisfaction Scale-CEPI (BMSLSS-CEPI) [ Time Frame: The BMSLSS-CEPI is completed by the youth at intake, at the 2nd treatment session, and every 8 weeks thereafter for as long as the youth is enrolled in the intervention (CFS). ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
    The BMSLSS-CEPI is a revised version of the Brief Multidimensional Students' Life Satisfaction Scale (Seligson, Huebner, & Valois, 2003). The BMSLSS-CEPI was designed to assess global life satisfaction as well as domain specific satisfaction with family, friends, school, self and living environment. Life satisfaction may be targeted directly or indirectly with treatment and thus can be thought of as a positive, or strengths-based, indicator of treatment progress (outcome).

  • The Children's Hope Scale (CHS) [ Time Frame: The CHS is completed by the youth at intake and every 8 weeks thereafter for as long as the youth is enrolled in the intervention (CFS). ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
    The CHS (Snyder et al., 1997), a public domain measure used with youth in this study, assesses youth hopefulness. The measure asks youths to report on their ability to generate paths toward goals and persevere toward those goals. Youth hopefulness is conceptually an important factor in the successful treatment of emotional or behavioral disorders, constituting an outcome that may be affected by the treatment process.


Enrollment: 356
Study Start Date: May 2004
Study Completion Date: June 2009
Primary Completion Date: December 2008 (Final data collection date for primary outcome measure)
Arms Assigned Interventions
Experimental: Weekly feedback
After clinical questionnaires are entered into the system (CFStm), an automated online report is available weekly to clinicians in the experimental group that shows current mental health status of youths, alerts, and trends over time based on youth, caregiver, and clinician responses. Reports also show some clinical data on caregivers.
Behavioral: Contextualized Feedback Systems (CFS)tm
After clinical questionnaires are entered, an automated feedback report is available online weekly to clinicians (and supervisors) in the experimental group. The report shows current mental health status of youths, alerts, and trends over time. Reports also show some clinical data on youths' caregivers.
No feedback
Clinicians in the control group do not have access to weekly feedback. Instead, they receive reports every 90 days after the youth is enrolled in CFStm. Because the average duration of CFS enrollment was 3.8 months, many youths would have been discharged before the first 90-day report became available three months after treatment start. Thus, we considered the 90-day feedback group to be essentially a no-feedback group.
Behavioral: Contextualized Feedback Systems (CFS)tm
After clinical questionnaires are entered, an automated feedback report is available online weekly to clinicians (and supervisors) in the experimental group. The report shows current mental health status of youths, alerts, and trends over time. Reports also show some clinical data on youths' caregivers.

Detailed Description:

The primary approach to improving psychosocial treatment for youths has been to implement evidence-supported treatments (ESTs) in community services. However, this approach has not produced clear cut results of effectiveness. A recently developed alternative is to improve outcomes through routine measurement and feedback to clinicians and supervisors. The investigators used a cluster randomized experiment with 28 sites affiliated with a national behavioral health organization to assess whether clients of clinicians who were scheduled to receive weekly feedback on their clients' progress would improve faster than clients of clinicians who were not scheduled to receive weekly feedback.

  Eligibility

Ages Eligible for Study:   11 Years to 18 Years
Genders Eligible for Study:   Both
Accepts Healthy Volunteers:   No
Criteria

Inclusion Criteria:

  • all youths 11-18 years old, entering treatment as usual, home-based services through the service provider. Youths' primary caregiver and clinician also participate.
  Contacts and Locations
Choosing to participate in a study is an important personal decision. Talk with your doctor and family members or friends about deciding to join a study. To learn more about this study, you or your doctor may contact the study research staff using the Contacts provided below. For general information, see Learn About Clinical Studies.

Please refer to this study by its ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT01308879

Locations
United States, Arizona
28 sites in 10 states affiliated with Providence Service Corporation (location info is for corporate office)
Tucson, Arizona, United States, 85701
Sponsors and Collaborators
Vanderbilt University
Leon Lowenstein Foundation
Investigators
Principal Investigator: Leonard Bickman, Ph.D. Center for Evaluation and Program Improvement, Vanderbilt University
  More Information

Additional Information:
No publications provided

Responsible Party: Leonard Bickman, Principal Investigator, Center for Evaluation and Program Improvement, Peabody College, Vanderbilt University
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT01308879     History of Changes
Other Study ID Numbers: 070342, R01MH068589
Study First Received: March 2, 2011
Last Updated: March 3, 2011
Health Authority: United States: Institutional Review Board

Keywords provided by Vanderbilt University:
Contextualized Feedback System (CFS)
Mental health outcomes
Quality improvement
Feedback
Clinical trial

ClinicalTrials.gov processed this record on August 28, 2014