Extension Study (Extended Access) of Cyclosporine Inhalation Solution (CIS) in Lung Transplant and Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplant Recipients for the Treatment of Bronchiolitis Obliterans

This study is currently recruiting participants. (see Contacts and Locations)
Verified November 2013 by National Institutes of Health Clinical Center (CC)
Sponsor:
Information provided by (Responsible Party):
National Institutes of Health Clinical Center (CC) ( National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI) )
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier:
NCT01273207
First received: January 7, 2011
Last updated: March 14, 2014
Last verified: November 2013
  Purpose

Bronchiolitis Obliterans (BO) is an obstructive lung disease that can affect individuals that have undergone a lung or hematopoietic stem cell transplant. BO has been studied most extensively in lung transplant recipients, where it is considered to represent chronic lung rejection. It is the leading cause of death after lung transplant, with mortality rates up to 55 percent. In hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, BO is thought to be a manifestation of chronic graft-vs-host disease (GVHD). Up to 45 percent of patients undergoing hematopoietic stem cell transplantation at the NHLBI develop a decline in pulmonary function. Conventional therapy for patients who develop BO consists of augmentation of systemic immunosuppressants. Systemic immunosuppression has limited efficacy for BO and is associated with deleterious consequences including increased risk of infections and decreased graft-versus tumor/leukemia effects.

Recently, cyclosporine inhalation solution (CIS) in solution with propylene glycol has been shown to improve overall survival and chronic rejection-free survival in lung transplant patients. These findings suggest targeted delivery of immunosuppressive therapy to the diseased organ warrants further investigation as this may minimize the morbidity associated with systemic immunosuppression. However, there currently exists limited data regarding the overall efficacy of inhaled cyclosporine to treat established BO following lung transplantation. Furthermore, inhaled cyclosporine has not been studied in the treatment of BO following hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

Here, we propose to evaluate the long-term safety and efficacy, of inhaled CIS for the treatment of BO. Enrollment will be offered to subjects who have completed the end of study (week 18 visit) for the initial protocol (Phase II Trial of CIS in lung transplant and hematopoietic stem cell transplant recipients for treatment of Bronchiolitis Obliterans) and who have shown evidence of benefit (either an improvement or stabilization) in BO/BOS with CIS treatment.

Clinical parameters, including pulmonary function tests, will be measured in addition to laboratory markers of the anti-inflammatory response to CIS. Adverse events associated with extended treatment with CIS will be recorded.

The primary objective is to provide long-term safety and efficacy data for the use of CIS in hematopoietic transplant patients and lung transplant patients with established BO.

Secondary objectives include investigation of the inflammatory pathways that lead to chronic BO and ascertainment of the long term anti-inflammatory effects of this CSA preparation ex vivo and in vivo.

Primary endpoint is the efficacy of extended use CIS for BO/BOS. Secondary endpoints include the toxicity profile (adverse events), improvement in high resolution chest CT images, results of peripheral blood and bronchoalveolar cytokine arrays to assess secondary markers of inflammation, and functional capacity measurements using a six-minute walk test....


Condition Intervention Phase
Bronchiolitis Obliterans
Constructive Bronchiolitis
Graft Versus Host Disease
Drug: Inhaled Cyclosporine Solution
Phase 2

Study Type: Interventional
Study Design: Allocation: Non-Randomized
Endpoint Classification: Safety/Efficacy Study
Intervention Model: Single Group Assignment
Masking: Open Label
Primary Purpose: Treatment
Official Title: Extension Study (Extended Access) of Cyclosporine Inhalation Solution (CIS) in Lung Transplant and Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplant Recipients for the Treatment of Bronchiolitis Obliterans

Resource links provided by NLM:


Further study details as provided by National Institutes of Health Clinical Center (CC):

Primary Outcome Measures:
  • Primary endpoints include the toxicity profile (adverse events) and efficacy of extended use CIS for BO/BOS [ Time Frame: 3 years ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]

Secondary Outcome Measures:
  • Secondary endpoints include improvement in chest CT images, results of peripheral blood and bronchoalveolar cytokine arrays, and functional capacity measurements [ Time Frame: 3 years ] [ Designated as safety issue: Yes ]
  • Toxicity profile (adverse events) [ Time Frame: 3 years ] [ Designated as safety issue: Yes ]

Estimated Enrollment: 78
Study Start Date: December 2010
Estimated Study Completion Date: December 2015
Estimated Primary Completion Date: December 2015 (Final data collection date for primary outcome measure)
Intervention Details:
    Drug: Inhaled Cyclosporine Solution
    N/A
Detailed Description:

Bronchiolitis Obliterans (BO) is an obstructive lung disease that can affect individuals that have undergone a lung or hematopoietic stem cell transplant. BO has been studied most extensively in lung transplant recipients, where it is considered to represent chronic lung rejection. It is the leading cause of death after lung transplant, with mortality rates up to 55 percent. In hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, BO is thought to be a manifestation of chronic graft-vs-host disease (GVHD). Up to 45 percent of patients undergoing hematopoietic stem cell transplantation at the NHLBI develop a decline in pulmonary function. Conventional therapy for patients who develop BO consists of augmentation of systemic immunosuppressants. Systemic immunosuppression has limited efficacy for BO and is associated with deleterious consequences including increased risk of infections and decreased graft-versus tumor/leukemia effects.

Recently, cyclosporine inhalation solution (CIS) in solution with propylene glycol has been shown to improve overall survival and chronic rejection-free survival in lung transplant patients. These findings suggest targeted delivery of immunosuppressive therapy to the diseased organ warrants further investigation as this may minimize the morbidity associated with systemic immunosuppression. However, there currently exists limited data regarding the overall efficacy of inhaled cyclosporine to treat established BO following lung transplantation. Furthermore, inhaled cyclosporine has not been studied in the treatment of BO following hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

Here, we propose to evaluate the long-term safety and efficacy, of inhaled CIS for the treatment of BO. Enrollment will be offered to subjects who have completed the end of study (week 18 visit) for the initial protocol (Phase II Trial of CIS in lung transplant and hematopoietic stem cell transplant recipients for treatment of Bronchiolitis Obliterans) and who have shown evidence of benefit (either an improvement or stabilization) in BO/BOS with CIS treatment.

Clinical parameters, including pulmonary function tests, will be measured in addition to laboratory markers of the anti-inflammatory response to CIS. Adverse events associated with extended treatment with CIS will be recorded.

The primary objective is to provide long-term safety and efficacy data for the use of CIS in hematopoietic transplant patients and lung transplant patients with established BO.

Secondary objectives include investigation of the inflammatory pathways that lead to chronic BO and ascertainment of the long term anti-inflammatory effects of this CSA preparation ex vivo and in vivo.

Primary endpoint is the efficacy of extended use CIS for BO/BOS. Secondary endpoints include the toxicity profile (adverse events), improvement in high resolution chest CT images, results of peripheral blood and bronchoalveolar cytokine arrays to assess secondary markers of inflammation, and functional capacity measurements using a six-minute walk test.

  Eligibility

Ages Eligible for Study:   10 Years to 80 Years
Genders Eligible for Study:   Both
Accepts Healthy Volunteers:   No
Criteria
  • INCLUSION CRITERIA:

    1. Completed the End of Study visit (week 19) on the initial protocol (Phase II Trial of Cyclosporine Inhalation Solution (CIS) in Lung Transplant and Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplant Recipients for Treatment of Bronchiolitis Obliterans) in the preceding two weeks
    2. Patients have shown evidence for a clinical benefit to CIS as evidenced by one or more of the following:
  • Improvement in pulmonary function defined by a 10 percent or more increase in the FEV1 at week 18, confirmed with repeat PFTs at least 1 week apart.
  • In patients with progressive disease at study entry on the initial protocol (Phase II Trial of Cyclosporine Inhalation Solution (CIS) in Lung Transplant and Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplant Recipients for Treatment of Bronchiolitis Obliterans), stabilization in pulmonary function, defined as less than a 10 percent improvement in FEV1 or less than 10 percent decline in FEV1 at week 18, confirmed with repeat PFTs at least 1 week apart.
  • In patients with stable disease (active BOS stable by FEV1 criteria) at study entry on the initial protocol (Phase II Trial of Cyclosporine Inhalation Solution (CIS) in Lung Transplant and Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplant Recipients for Treatment of Bronchiolitis Obliterans), stabilization in pulmonary function, defined as less than a 10 percent improvement in their FEV1 or less than 10 percent decline in FEV1, and a decrease in the dose of one or more systemic immunosuppressants by at least 25 percent (sustained for 3 weeks, excluding adjustments made for target drug levels)

EXCLUSION CRITERIA:

  1. More than a two week gap in study drug administration (CIS)
  2. Evidence of uncontrolled, pulmonary infection
  3. ECOG performance status greater than or equal to 3
  4. Patient pregnant or breast feeding or not willing to continue the use of an approved method of birth control
  5. Life expectancy less than 18 weeks
  6. History of hypersensitivity reaction to propylene glycol
  7. Documented allergy or intolerance to CIS
  8. History of untreated coronary insufficiency, severe cardiac arrhythmias, and/or uncontrolled hypertension.
  9. Serum creatinine greater than 2.5 mg/dl
  10. Inability to comprehend the investigational nature of the study and provide informed consent
  Contacts and Locations
Choosing to participate in a study is an important personal decision. Talk with your doctor and family members or friends about deciding to join a study. To learn more about this study, you or your doctor may contact the study research staff using the Contacts provided below. For general information, see Learn About Clinical Studies.

Please refer to this study by its ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT01273207

Contacts
Contact: Catalina Ramos, R.N. (301) 451-1173 cramos@mail.nih.gov
Contact: Nicole J Gormley, M.D. (240) 402-0210 nicole.gormley@nih.gov

Locations
United States, Maryland
National Institutes of Health Clinical Center, 9000 Rockville Pike Recruiting
Bethesda, Maryland, United States, 20892
Contact: For more information at the NIH Clinical Center contact Patient Recruitment and Public Liaison Office (PRPL)    800-411-1222 ext TTY8664111010    prpl@mail.cc.nih.gov   
Sponsors and Collaborators
Investigators
Principal Investigator: Nicole J Gormley, M.D. National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI)
  More Information

Additional Information:
Publications:
Responsible Party: National Institutes of Health Clinical Center (CC) ( National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI) )
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT01273207     History of Changes
Other Study ID Numbers: 110064, 11-H-0064
Study First Received: January 7, 2011
Last Updated: March 14, 2014
Health Authority: United States: Federal Government

Keywords provided by National Institutes of Health Clinical Center (CC):
Peripheral Blood Stem Cell Transplant
Inhaled Cyclosporine
Graft-Versus-Host Disease
Bone Marrow Transplant
Lung Transplantation
Bronchiolitis Obliterans
Graft Versus Host Disease

Additional relevant MeSH terms:
Bronchitis
Bronchiolitis
Bronchiolitis Obliterans
Graft vs Host Disease
Bronchial Diseases
Respiratory Tract Diseases
Lung Diseases, Obstructive
Lung Diseases
Respiratory Tract Infections
Immune System Diseases
Cyclosporins
Cyclosporine
Pharmaceutical Solutions
Enzyme Inhibitors
Molecular Mechanisms of Pharmacological Action
Pharmacologic Actions
Immunosuppressive Agents
Immunologic Factors
Physiological Effects of Drugs
Antifungal Agents
Anti-Infective Agents
Therapeutic Uses
Dermatologic Agents
Antirheumatic Agents

ClinicalTrials.gov processed this record on August 01, 2014