Traumatic Ulnar Translocation of the Carpus

This study has been completed.
Sponsor:
Information provided by (Responsible Party):
John Berschback, Northwestern University
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier:
NCT01258166
First received: December 9, 2010
Last updated: February 2, 2012
Last verified: February 2012
  Purpose

Ulnar translocation of the carpus is a form of wrist instability where the small bones of the wrist shift out of position. It is well recognized in patients with rheumatoid arthritis, but can also occur after a traumatic event, such as a violent football tackle or a fall from a height. The treatment options vary considerably, and there is no consensus of how to best address this injury pattern.

Because traumatic ulnar translocation is relatively rare, the diagnosis may be missed or delayed, causing problems for the patient such as persistent pain and loss of function. The investigators present 11 cases of this injury, discuss how to recognize it, and report our results after different treatment methods.


Condition Intervention
Traumatic Ulnar Translocation of the Carpus
Procedure: Surgery or immobilization

Study Type: Observational
Study Design: Observational Model: Case-Only
Time Perspective: Retrospective
Official Title: Traumatic Ulnar Translocation of the Carpus: Early Diagnosis and Treatment

Further study details as provided by Northwestern University:

Enrollment: 10
Study Start Date: January 2005
Study Completion Date: January 2012
Primary Completion Date: January 2012 (Final data collection date for primary outcome measure)
Groups/Cohorts Assigned Interventions
Tramuatic ulnar translocation
Patients who suffered a traumatic ulnar translocation following injury.
Procedure: Surgery or immobilization

Detailed Description:

Ulnar translocation of the carpus is a form of wrist instability where the entire carpus translates medially along the inclined plane of the distal radius. This pattern of instability has been well recognized in patients with rheumatoid arthritis as a result of articular erosions and attenuation of wrist ligaments. In contrast, ulnar translocation of the carpus following trauma is seemingly rare, with published accounts limited to case reports and small case series.

The radiographic features of traumatic ulnocarpal translocation have been described and the instability pattern has been reproduced in cadaveric models. However, the recognition of radiocarpal malalignment may be unintentionally missed or delayed owing due to the uncommon nature of the this injury. The investigators present 11 cases of posttraumatic ulnar translocation of the carpus and review criteria for early recognition of the injury and the results following varying treatment methods.

  Eligibility

Ages Eligible for Study:   17 Years to 80 Years
Genders Eligible for Study:   Both
Accepts Healthy Volunteers:   No
Sampling Method:   Non-Probability Sample
Study Population

Patients who suffered traumatic ulnar translocation of the carpus

Criteria

Inclusion Criteria:

Patient who suffered traumatic ulnar translocation of the carpus Willing to sign the consent

Exclusion Criteria:

Patients with collagen vascular disease

  Contacts and Locations
Please refer to this study by its ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT01258166

Locations
United States, Illinois
Chicago Center for Surgery of the Hand
Chicago, Illinois, United States, 60611
Sponsors and Collaborators
Northwestern University