Biological Response of Trauma Patients to Standard Trauma Resuscitation Therapy

This study is ongoing, but not recruiting participants.
Sponsor:
Collaborator:
Information provided by (Responsible Party):
University of Missouri, Kansas City
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier:
NCT01239680
First received: October 12, 2010
Last updated: October 15, 2013
Last verified: October 2013
  Purpose

Overall aim of this work is to evaluate new methods of resuscitation that can be applied by front-line responders on the battlefield, in civilian life, or which can be used during initial resuscitation in the first fixed facility to which the injured patient is brought.


Condition Intervention
Hemorrhagic Shock
Drug: Glutamine
Drug: Ringer's Lactate

Study Type: Interventional
Study Design: Allocation: Randomized
Intervention Model: Parallel Assignment
Masking: Double Blind (Subject, Caregiver, Investigator, Outcomes Assessor)
Primary Purpose: Treatment
Official Title: Biological Response of Trauma Patients to Standard Trauma Resuscitation Therapy.

Resource links provided by NLM:


Further study details as provided by University of Missouri, Kansas City:

Primary Outcome Measures:
  • Biological response as characterized by microarray analysis, selected cytokines, TNFα, IL-1, IL-6 [ Time Frame: Change from Baseline in Inflammatory Gene Activation at 24 hours ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]

Estimated Enrollment: 12
Study Start Date: January 2011
Estimated Study Completion Date: December 2013
Estimated Primary Completion Date: October 2013 (Final data collection date for primary outcome measure)
Arms Assigned Interventions
Placebo Comparator: Standard Fluid Resuscitation
Administration of Ringer's Lactate per Advanced Trauma Life Support Protocol with additional Ringer's Lactate
Drug: Glutamine
Intravenous 25 grams once over 6 hours
Drug: Ringer's Lactate
Intravenous 1 liter once over 6 hours
Experimental: Standard fluid resuscitation
Administration of Ringer's Lactate per Advanced Trauma Life Support Protocol with additional glutamine
Drug: Glutamine
Intravenous 25 grams once over 6 hours
Drug: Ringer's Lactate
Intravenous 1 liter once over 6 hours

Detailed Description:

Shock is a leading cause of death among American forces in battle, with many trauma victims dying of early hemorrhagic shock or from late septic shock.1 Shock is defined as circulatory collapse, when the arterial blood pressure is too low to maintain an adequate supply of blood to the body's vital organs and tissues. Specifically, hemorrhagic shock results when blood vessels are physically damaged while septic shock results when microbes or microbial products enter the blood stream. Despite advances in medical science, including the development of improved antibiotics, treatments for hemorrhagic and septic shock have changed little in the past 30-40 years. A wounded soldier bleeding on the battlefield, or a trauma victim in the United States, is treated today largely as he or she would have been treated in 1970.

The overall aim of this work is to evaluate new methods of resuscitation that can be applied by front-line responders on the battlefield (medical corpsmen, combat medics), in civilian life (Emergency Medical System), or which can be used during initial resuscitation in the first fixed facility to which the injured patient is brought. This might be a Fire Support Specialist (FIST) team in a combat theater or a trauma center in the civilian health care system.

  Eligibility

Ages Eligible for Study:   21 Years to 65 Years
Genders Eligible for Study:   Both
Accepts Healthy Volunteers:   No
Criteria

Inclusion Criteria:

  • Blunt or penetrating trauma patients who meet TMC criteria for a trauma activation.
  • These patients will typically be in shock and have blunt injuries or penetrating trauma.
  • Patients must be alert, awake, oriented, and responsive and be English speaking males or females between the ages 21-65.

Exclusion Criteria:

  • traumatic cardiac arrest patients,
  • pregnant patients,
  • interhospital transfer patients,
  • non-English speaking patients,
  • patients with suspected or confirmed Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) or AIDs based on clear history,
  • prior laboratory tests, or strong clinical suspicion; patients with clinical evidence of impaired mental function;
  • patients with continuing hypotension or tachycardia after resuscitation;
  • patients with blood alcohol in excess of 80mg/dl;
  • signs suggestive of coagulopathy;
  • allergy to glutamine;
  • liver disease or renal disease.
  Contacts and Locations
Please refer to this study by its ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT01239680

Locations
United States, Missouri
Truman Medical Center-Hospital Hill
Kansas City, Missouri, United States, 64108
Univeristy of Missouri-Kansas City
Kansas City, Missouri, United States, 64108
Sponsors and Collaborators
University of Missouri, Kansas City
Investigators
Principal Investigator: Charles Van Way, III, M.D. University of Missouri, Kansas City
  More Information

No publications provided

Responsible Party: University of Missouri, Kansas City
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT01239680     History of Changes
Other Study ID Numbers: 05-18
Study First Received: October 12, 2010
Last Updated: October 15, 2013
Health Authority: United States: Institutional Review Board

Keywords provided by University of Missouri, Kansas City:
hemorrhagic shock
glutamine
trauma resuscitation
department of defense
trauma

Additional relevant MeSH terms:
Shock
Shock, Hemorrhagic
Wounds and Injuries
Pathologic Processes
Hemorrhage

ClinicalTrials.gov processed this record on April 22, 2014