Cancer, Vulnerability, and Financial Quality of Life: A Mixed Methods Study

The recruitment status of this study is unknown because the information has not been verified recently.
Verified March 2012 by Georgetown University.
Recruitment status was  Active, not recruiting
Sponsor:
Information provided by (Responsible Party):
Christine Callahan, MSW, LCSW-C, Georgetown University
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier:
NCT01169545
First received: July 22, 2010
Last updated: March 8, 2012
Last verified: March 2012
  Purpose

The primary purpose of this study is to examine how vulnerabilities in psychological and social situations affect financial quality of life. For people who are experiencing financial hardship, a cancer diagnosis can be devastating. For others, cancer may cause or even worsen financial stress, for example, with their work, their ability to maintain benefits such as health insurance, their ability to pay bills, and their ability to get the cancer treatment they need. The impact of cancer on financial quality of life is an important area of study within cancer care. Considering the financial burden of cancer also lends greater appreciation for the problems that people face if they cannot handle cancer's costs, or if needed resources are either not present or are too stretched to help with the care they need. For this study, up to 180 cancer patients will be interviewed with a written questionnaire. Of this group, 15 people will also be asked if they would like to participate in a follow-up personal interview with the researcher. The major hypothesis of this study is: The greater the vulnerabilities in predisposing factors and enabling factors, the greater the need factors with respect to cancer diagnosis and treatment, and the lower the perceived ability to adhere to treatment, the poorer will be the financial quality of life.


Condition
Cancer

Study Type: Observational
Study Design: Time Perspective: Cross-Sectional
Official Title: Cancer, Vulnerability, and Financial Quality of Life: A Mixed Methods Study

Resource links provided by NLM:


Further study details as provided by Georgetown University:

Secondary Outcome Measures:
  • The secondary purpose is to explore qualitatively the relationship between personal control and financial quality of life within the larger context of health locus of control [ Time Frame: December 2010 ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]

Estimated Enrollment: 180
Study Start Date: May 2010
Estimated Study Completion Date: October 2012
Estimated Primary Completion Date: October 2012 (Final data collection date for primary outcome measure)
Groups/Cohorts
Cancer patients over the age of 18

  Eligibility

Ages Eligible for Study:   18 Years and older
Genders Eligible for Study:   Both
Accepts Healthy Volunteers:   No
Sampling Method:   Non-Probability Sample
Study Population

Any cancer patient over the age of 18 who can speak and understand English and can provide informed consent

Criteria

Inclusion Criteria:

  • Any cancer patient over the age of 18 who can speak and understand English and can provide informed consent

Exclusion Criteria:

  • Pediatric patients; non-English-speaking patients
  Contacts and Locations
Please refer to this study by its ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT01169545

Locations
United States, District of Columbia
Washington Cancer Institute
Washington, DC, District of Columbia, United States, 20010
United States, Maryland
NIH Clinical Center
Bethesda, Maryland, United States, 20892
Sponsors and Collaborators
Georgetown University
Investigators
Principal Investigator: Christine C. Callahan, MSW The Catholic University of America
  More Information

No publications provided

Responsible Party: Christine Callahan, MSW, LCSW-C, clinical social worker and PhD candidate, Georgetown University
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT01169545     History of Changes
Other Study ID Numbers: 2010-090
Study First Received: July 22, 2010
Last Updated: March 8, 2012
Health Authority: United States: Institutional Review Board

Keywords provided by Georgetown University:
any type of cancer

ClinicalTrials.gov processed this record on April 22, 2014