Yoga for Stress Management in Health Care Personnel

This study has been completed.
Sponsor:
Collaborators:
Ekhaga Foundation Stockholm Sweden
Stockholm County Council, Sweden
Information provided by:
Karolinska Institutet
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier:
NCT01168648
First received: July 22, 2010
Last updated: NA
Last verified: July 2010
History: No changes posted
  Purpose

The purpose of this study is to investigate if yoga can be an effective stress management technique for health care personnel.


Condition Intervention
Yoga
Stress, Psychological
Stress, Physiological
Behavioral: Yoga as stress management
Other: Rest without using any relaxation technique

Study Type: Interventional
Study Design: Allocation: Randomized
Endpoint Classification: Efficacy Study
Intervention Model: Parallel Assignment
Masking: Open Label
Primary Purpose: Prevention
Official Title: Yoga for Stress Management in Health Care Personnel and Its Relation to the Hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal(HPA)Axis

Resource links provided by NLM:


Further study details as provided by Karolinska Institutet:

Primary Outcome Measures:
  • Reduced cortisol secretion [ Time Frame: Three months ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]

Secondary Outcome Measures:
  • Reduced stress measured by qualitative questionnaires (SWEQUAL, JSS, KASAM) [ Time Frame: Three months ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]

Enrollment: 71
Study Start Date: August 2003
Study Completion Date: May 2005
Primary Completion Date: May 2005 (Final data collection date for primary outcome measure)
Arms Assigned Interventions
Experimental: Yoga as stress management
The intervention consists of following a program of yoga at least three times a week for three months. The yoga program has been designed to reduce stress.
Behavioral: Yoga as stress management
Yoga specially designed to reduce stress is practiced for approximately 30 minutes at least three times a week for three months, once in a group session led by a trained yoga instructor and twice or more at home. The yoga techniques used are physical postures or movements, meditation and breathing exercises. Every time they do the techniques, participants fill in a form detailing how they feel before and after and providing information on the experience of doing the exercises.
Other Names:
  • Asanas(physical postures or movements)
  • Pranayama (breathing exercises)
  • Meditation
Active Comparator: Control group
The group rests without using any specific program for relaxation at least three times a week for three months.
Other: Rest without using any relaxation technique
The participants rest at home at least 30 minutes, at least three times a week for three months and without using any relaxation technique
Yoga as stress management fewer tests
Eight persons participated in the same intervention as the experimental arm but did not undergo the full range of tests because they did not meet all the inclusion criteria for the study, most commonly because of medication use or body mass index.
Behavioral: Yoga as stress management
Yoga specially designed to reduce stress is practiced for approximately 30 minutes at least three times a week for three months, once in a group session led by a trained yoga instructor and twice or more at home. The yoga techniques used are physical postures or movements, meditation and breathing exercises. Every time they do the techniques, participants fill in a form detailing how they feel before and after and providing information on the experience of doing the exercises.
Other Names:
  • Asanas(physical postures or movements)
  • Pranayama (breathing exercises)
  • Meditation

Detailed Description:

Stress, both job related and personal, is an increasing problem in the health care sector. Yoga is said to have a good stress-reducing effect.

The participants will provide blood, urine, and saliva samples. They will take part in two different stress tests. They will also fill in various qualitative questionnaires, including the Swedish questionnaire on health related quality of life (SWEDQUAL), Antonovsky's sense of coherence scale (KASAM), and the Job stress survey (JSS), both before the study starts and after 3 months of participation.

  Eligibility

Ages Eligible for Study:   18 Years to 65 Years
Genders Eligible for Study:   Both
Accepts Healthy Volunteers:   No
Criteria

Inclusion Criteria:

  • BMI 18-30
  • healthy
  • work in the health care sector

Exclusion Criteria:

  • medication, including contraceptives and all medications or topical skin preparations with cortisone in any form (exception: hormone replacement therapy for hypothyroidism were included if their hormone levels were within the normal range)
  Contacts and Locations
Choosing to participate in a study is an important personal decision. Talk with your doctor and family members or friends about deciding to join a study. To learn more about this study, you or your doctor may contact the study research staff using the Contacts provided below. For general information, see Learn About Clinical Studies.

Please refer to this study by its ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT01168648

Locations
Sweden
Center for Family and Community Medicine, KI
Huddinge, Stockholm, Sweden, 141 83
Sponsors and Collaborators
Karolinska Institutet
Ekhaga Foundation Stockholm Sweden
Stockholm County Council, Sweden
Investigators
Principal Investigator: Astrid M Grensman, MD KI, Center for Family and Community Medicine
Principal Investigator: Bikash D Acharya, M sc in Psy KI, Center for Family and Community Medicine
  More Information

No publications provided

Responsible Party: Astrid Grensman, MD, Karolinska Institutet, Center for Family and Community Medicine
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT01168648     History of Changes
Other Study ID Numbers: Ekhagastiftelsen 2001-5
Study First Received: July 22, 2010
Last Updated: July 22, 2010
Health Authority: Sweden: Regional Ethical Review Board

Keywords provided by Karolinska Institutet:
Yoga
Stress
Stress management
Hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal axis

Additional relevant MeSH terms:
Stress, Psychological
Behavioral Symptoms

ClinicalTrials.gov processed this record on September 16, 2014