Study of the Impact of Parental Note Taking on the Effectiveness of Anticipatory Guidance

This study has been completed.
Sponsor:
Collaborator:
The Joel and Barbara Alpert Endowment For The Children of The City
Information provided by (Responsible Party):
Boston Medical Center
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier:
NCT01014169
First received: November 13, 2009
Last updated: September 20, 2012
Last verified: September 2012
  Purpose

The delivery of anticipatory guidance is an essential component of pediatric practice. Given the large amount of information to be shared during each encounter and the limited time available, there is a need for an effective and efficient means of communication between health care providers and families. The investigators hypothesize that more active parental participation in the form of note taking during the delivery of anticipatory guidance will lead to increased knowledge, higher levels of satisfaction with the encounter, and increased adoption of recommended parenting practices.

In this study, the investigators propose a randomized controlled trial of the impact of note taking during the delivery of newborn anticipatory guidance on maternal practices related to newborn care. The investigators plan to compare a control group of mothers receiving standard of care anticipatory guidance with an intervention group of mothers who are encouraged to take written notes while receiving the anticipatory guidance. The primary outcome of interest is maternal practice related to infant sleep position, and the secondary outcomes of interest are maternal practice related to breastfeeding initiation and car seat use. The investigators also plan to evaluate the impact of note taking on mothers' knowledge of recommended practices related to newborn care and on mothers' satisfaction with the guidance received.


Condition Intervention
Health Education
Sudden Infant Death
Behavioral: Note taking

Study Type: Interventional
Study Design: Allocation: Randomized
Intervention Model: Parallel Assignment
Masking: Single Blind (Outcomes Assessor)
Primary Purpose: Health Services Research
Official Title: A Randomized Controlled Trial of The Impact of Parental Note Taking on the Effectiveness of Anticipatory Guidance: the Suzuki Music Model Applied to Urban Pediatrics

Resource links provided by NLM:


Further study details as provided by Boston Medical Center:

Primary Outcome Measures:
  • The Primary Outcome of Interest is Maternal Practice Related to Supine Infant Sleep Position. [ Time Frame: two days after discharge ] [ Designated as safety issue: Yes ]
    This measure assesses maternal report of placing the infant on the back to sleep (supine sleep position) as opposed to putting the infant on its side or stomach.


Secondary Outcome Measures:
  • Maternal Practice Related to Breastfeeding Initiation [ Time Frame: two days after discharge ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
    This measure assesses maternal report of breastfeeding. The number analyzed is the number who reported any breastfeeding.

  • Maternal Practice Related to Correct Car Seat Use [ Time Frame: two days after discharge ] [ Designated as safety issue: Yes ]
    Correct car seat use by all subjects who use cars was defined as placing the car seat in the back seat facing backwards and using the car seat every time the infant travels by car. The number reported is the number who report using the car seat correctly.


Enrollment: 126
Study Start Date: December 2009
Study Completion Date: December 2010
Primary Completion Date: December 2010 (Final data collection date for primary outcome measure)
Arms Assigned Interventions
No Intervention: Usual care
Mothers in the control group will receive the nursing discharge newborn information from the nurse practitioner [sometimes via a Spanish interpreter, if required] according to current standard of care, which includes verbal information and written handouts.
Experimental: Note taking
The mothers in the intervention group will be given a pen and encouraged to take written notes in the notes section of the discharge envelope using their language of preference when receiving the standard newborn information.
Behavioral: Note taking
The mothers in the intervention group will be given a pen and encouraged to take written notes in the notes section of a discharge envelope using their language of preference when receiving standard newborn discharge information.

  Show Detailed Description

  Eligibility

Ages Eligible for Study:   15 Years and older
Genders Eligible for Study:   Female
Accepts Healthy Volunteers:   Yes
Criteria

Inclusion Criteria:

  • newborn gestational age greater than 35 weeks
  • maternal spoken fluency in either English or Spanish
  • a working telephone in the home.

Exclusion Criteria:

  • either the newborn or the mother has a medical condition requiring hospitalization for longer than 4 days after a cesarean section or 2 days after a vaginal delivery
  • mother not expected to retain custody of the infant at the time of discharge
  Contacts and Locations
Choosing to participate in a study is an important personal decision. Talk with your doctor and family members or friends about deciding to join a study. To learn more about this study, you or your doctor may contact the study research staff using the Contacts provided below. For general information, see Learn About Clinical Studies.

Please refer to this study by its ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT01014169

Locations
United States, Massachusetts
Boston Medical Center
Boston, Massachusetts, United States, 02118
Sponsors and Collaborators
Boston Medical Center
The Joel and Barbara Alpert Endowment For The Children of The City
Investigators
Principal Investigator: C. Jason Wang, MD Boston Medical Center
  More Information

Publications:
Kendall J. Suzuki's Mother Tongue Method. Music Educators Journal. 1986;72:47-50
Creech A and Hallam S. Parent-teacher-pupil interactions in instrumental music tuition: a literature review. B.J. Music Ed. 2003;20:29-44.
Grilli S. An interview with Dr. Shin'ichi Suzuki at the Talent Education Institute. International Review of Education. 1992; 38: 547-551.
Intons-Peterson MJ, Fournier J. External and Internal Memory Aids: When and How Often Do We Use Them? Journal of Experimental Psychology: General. 1986;115:267-280.
Kiewra KA DuBois NF, McShane CD, et al. Note-taking functions and techniques. Journal of Educational Psychology. 1991;83:240-245.
Andrade J. What Does Doodling Do? Appl Cognit Psychol.2009;23:1-7.
2008. Bright Futures: Guidelines for Health Supervision of Infants, Children, and Adolescents, Third Edition. Elk Grove Village, IL: American Academy of Pediatrics.

Responsible Party: Boston Medical Center
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT01014169     History of Changes
Other Study ID Numbers: H-28356
Study First Received: November 13, 2009
Results First Received: August 20, 2012
Last Updated: September 20, 2012
Health Authority: United States: Institutional Review Board

Keywords provided by Boston Medical Center:
Health education
Sudden Infant Death
Breast Feeding
Infant Equipment

Additional relevant MeSH terms:
Sudden Infant Death
Death, Sudden
Death
Pathologic Processes

ClinicalTrials.gov processed this record on October 02, 2014