Prevention of Weight Gain in University Students (PGP2)

This study has been completed.
Sponsor:
Collaborators:
Canadian Diabetes Association
Danone Institute
Information provided by (Responsible Party):
Marie-France Hivert, Université de Sherbrooke
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier:
NCT00995462
First received: October 14, 2009
Last updated: December 10, 2013
Last verified: December 2013
  Purpose

This study assess whether a small-group seminar intervention to prevent weight gain is effective in a general university student population, and to address the relative role of biological vs. lifestyle factors in predicting weight gain in humans.


Condition Intervention
Prevention
Weight Gain
Behavioral: Lifestyle intervention seminars

Study Type: Interventional
Study Design: Allocation: Randomized
Intervention Model: Parallel Assignment
Masking: Open Label
Primary Purpose: Prevention
Official Title: Prevention of Weight Gain in University Students

Further study details as provided by Université de Sherbrooke:

Primary Outcome Measures:
  • Weight change [ Time Frame: 2 years ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]

Enrollment: 319
Study Start Date: September 2006
Study Completion Date: December 2011
Primary Completion Date: October 2011 (Final data collection date for primary outcome measure)
Arms Assigned Interventions
No Intervention: Control
Experimental: Small-group seminar for 2 years Behavioral: Lifestyle intervention seminars
The first sessions emphasize acquisition of new knowledge during interactive group seminars designed to maximize attendant's participation by adapting wellknown quiz-show or parlour games to deliver key concepts. A number of sessions are aimed at increasing self-efficacy through problem-solving, time-management strategies, individual self monitoring and goal-setting.During the second year, the intervention focuses on maintenance of healthy behaviour with empowerment of the participants using problem-solving, goal-setting, planning, and self-monitoring skills.
Experimental: Small-group seminars for 1 year followed by email intervention Behavioral: Lifestyle intervention seminars
The first sessions emphasize acquisition of new knowledge during interactive group seminars designed to maximize attendant's participation by adapting wellknown quiz-show or parlour games to deliver key concepts. A number of sessions are aimed at increasing self-efficacy through problem-solving, time-management strategies, individual self monitoring and goal-setting.During the second year, the intervention focuses on maintenance of healthy behaviour with empowerment of the participants using problem-solving, goal-setting, planning, and self-monitoring skills.

  Eligibility

Ages Eligible for Study:   18 Years and older
Genders Eligible for Study:   Both
Accepts Healthy Volunteers:   Yes
Criteria

Inclusion Criteria:

  • First year students at the Université de Sherbrooke.

Exclusion Criteria:

  • Presence of diseases or medications that would be expected to affect weight (cystic fibrosis, diabetes, inflammatory bowel diseases, anorexia nervosa, bulimia, etc.).
  • Pregnancy or planning a pregnancy in the next two years.
  • Unable to give an informed consent.
  Contacts and Locations
Please refer to this study by its ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT00995462

Locations
Canada, Quebec
Université de Sherbrooke
Sherbrooke, Quebec, Canada, J1K 2R1
Sponsors and Collaborators
Marie-France Hivert
Canadian Diabetes Association
Danone Institute
Investigators
Principal Investigator: Marie-France Langlois, MD Université de Sherbrooke
  More Information

No publications provided by Université de Sherbrooke

Additional publications automatically indexed to this study by ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier (NCT Number):
Responsible Party: Marie-France Hivert, MD, Université de Sherbrooke
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT00995462     History of Changes
Other Study ID Numbers: 05-025
Study First Received: October 14, 2009
Last Updated: December 10, 2013
Health Authority: Canada: Health Canada

Additional relevant MeSH terms:
Weight Gain
Body Weight Changes
Body Weight
Signs and Symptoms

ClinicalTrials.gov processed this record on April 17, 2014