Progression of Cognitive and Physical Symptoms in Multiple Sclerosis

This study is enrolling participants by invitation only.
Sponsor:
Collaborator:
University of Missouri, Kansas City
Information provided by:
MidAmerica Neuroscience Institute
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier:
NCT00922831
First received: June 16, 2009
Last updated: NA
Last verified: June 2009
History: No changes posted
  Purpose

The purpose of this study is to look at multiple sclerosis patients process of awareness, learning, and judging status over a 3 year time period.


Condition
Multiple Sclerosis

Study Type: Observational
Study Design: Observational Model: Cohort
Time Perspective: Prospective
Official Title: Progression of Cognitive, Affective, and Physical Symptoms in Multiple Sclerosis.

Resource links provided by NLM:


Further study details as provided by MidAmerica Neuroscience Institute:

Estimated Enrollment: 100
Study Start Date: August 2008
Estimated Study Completion Date: August 2013
Estimated Primary Completion Date: August 2013 (Final data collection date for primary outcome measure)
Detailed Description:

Patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) frequently experience cognitive and emotional difficulties. Theses neuropsychiatric symptoms are known to be associated with reduced quality of life. However, little is known about the evolution of MS patients' neuropsychiatric difficulties and how these neuropsychiatric changes may be related to other MS symptoms. The purpose of the present study is to examine MS patients' cognitive and emotional status over time as part of standard neuropsychological evaluations in a private practice setting. MS patients presenting for neuropsychological evaluation at the MidAmerica Neuroscience Institute will be provided with the option of participating in thorough evaluation of their cognitive and affective MS symptoms. They will then be followed clinically and receive re-evaluation over a period of 3 years on a yearly basis. It is hoped that this study will help us obtain a better understanding of the factors associated with worsening cognition in MS. A greater understanding of the factors associated with cognitive and affective decline in MS help could lead to the early identification and treatment of at-risk patients.

  Eligibility

Ages Eligible for Study:   18 Years and older
Genders Eligible for Study:   Both
Accepts Healthy Volunteers:   No
Sampling Method:   Non-Probability Sample
Study Population

Neurology Care Clinic

Criteria

Inclusion Criteria:

  • Male/female subjects at least 18 years of age with a diagnosis of Clinically Definite Multiple Sclerosis (CDMS) or Clinically Isolated Syndrome (CIS)as confirmed by a neurologist.
  • Subjects must be able to give written informed consent and comply with the study protocol. Subjects must also be able to read, write and understand English.
  • Are capable of performing the requirements of the neuropsychological test battery.

Exclusion Criteria:

  • As judged by the investigator, any clinically significant, unstable or major concomitant disorder or medications.
  • In the opinion of the Investigator should not participate in the study.
  Contacts and Locations
Please refer to this study by its ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT00922831

Sponsors and Collaborators
MidAmerica Neuroscience Institute
University of Missouri, Kansas City
Investigators
Principal Investigator: Hunter T Feaster, PsyD MidAmerica Neuroscience Institute
Principal Investigator: Jared Bruce, PhD University of Missouri, Kansas City
  More Information

No publications provided

Responsible Party: H. Todd Feaster, PsyD, MidAmerica Neuroscience Institute
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT00922831     History of Changes
Other Study ID Numbers: 080514
Study First Received: June 16, 2009
Last Updated: June 16, 2009
Health Authority: United States: Institutional Review Board

Keywords provided by MidAmerica Neuroscience Institute:
Cognition, Affective MS symptoms

Additional relevant MeSH terms:
Multiple Sclerosis
Sclerosis
Demyelinating Autoimmune Diseases, CNS
Autoimmune Diseases of the Nervous System
Nervous System Diseases
Demyelinating Diseases
Autoimmune Diseases
Immune System Diseases
Pathologic Processes

ClinicalTrials.gov processed this record on April 15, 2014