Prevalence and Epidemiology of Nosocomial Candidaemia and Antifungal Susceptibility Patterns in an Italian Tertiary-Care Hospital

The recruitment status of this study is unknown because the information has not been verified recently.
Verified May 2009 by University of Modena and Reggio Emilia.
Recruitment status was  Active, not recruiting
Sponsor:
Information provided by:
University of Modena and Reggio Emilia
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier:
NCT00903526
First received: May 15, 2009
Last updated: NA
Last verified: May 2009
History: No changes posted
  Purpose

During the past two decades, the frequency of invasive fungal infections has increased dramatically in hospitalised patients throughout the world, and Candida has now emerged as one of the leading causes of bloodstream infections (BSIs). Risk-factors for invasive candidiasis include improvements in intensive care strategies (i.e., central venous catheters, mechanical ventilation, hyper-alimentation), prolonged stays in intensive care units (ICUs), the development of more aggressive surgical techniques, and the prolongation of survival of critically-ill patients. Two other important factors, observed mainly in cancer patients, are colonization of mucous membranes by yeasts, and neutropenia, resulting from increased use of antibiotics and anti-neoplastic agents, respectively. The crude mortality rate of candidaemia is high (38-75%), and the attributable mortality has been estimated at 25-38%. During the past 15 years, the prevalence of infections caused by non-albicans Candida spp. has increased exponentially, so that these organisms now account for > 50% of episodes of fungaemia in various surveys. The increase in invasive fungal infections, the associated high mortality rate, and the emergence of antifungal resistance, have all driven the search for more potent antifungal drugs. The aims of the present study are to investigate the prevalence and the epidemiology of candidaemia and to determine the antifungal susceptibility patterns of Candida spp. isolates from a tertiary-care hospital in Italy.


Condition
Candidemia

Study Type: Observational
Study Design: Observational Model: Cohort
Time Perspective: Retrospective
Official Title: Prevalence and Epidemiology of Nosocomial Candidaemia and Antifungal Susceptibility Patterns in an Italian Tertiary-Care Hospital

Resource links provided by NLM:


Further study details as provided by University of Modena and Reggio Emilia:

Primary Outcome Measures:
  • The aims of the present study are to investigate the prevalence and the epidemiology of candidaemia and to determine the antifungal susceptibility patterns of Candida spp. isolates from a tertiary-care hospital in Italy. [ Time Frame: 2009 ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]

Estimated Enrollment: 250
Study Start Date: March 2009
Groups/Cohorts
candidemia

  Eligibility

Genders Eligible for Study:   Both
Accepts Healthy Volunteers:   No
Sampling Method:   Non-Probability Sample
Study Population

patients diagnosed with a nosocomial candidaemia at the University Hospital of Modena, Italy, between January 1998 and March 2008

Criteria

Inclusion Criteria:

  • patients diagnosed with a nosocomial candidaemia at the University Hospital of Modena, Italy, between January 1998 and March 2008
  Contacts and Locations
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No Contacts or Locations Provided
  More Information

No publications provided

Responsible Party: Dr Giovanni Guaraldi/ Dr Mauro Codeluppi, Infectoius Disease Clinic
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT00903526     History of Changes
Other Study ID Numbers: 3423/CE
Study First Received: May 15, 2009
Last Updated: May 15, 2009
Health Authority: Italy: Ethics Committee

Keywords provided by University of Modena and Reggio Emilia:
fungal susceptibility

Additional relevant MeSH terms:
Disease Susceptibility
Candidemia
Disease Attributes
Pathologic Processes
Fungemia
Sepsis
Infection
Candidiasis, Invasive
Candidiasis
Mycoses
Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome
Inflammation

ClinicalTrials.gov processed this record on September 16, 2014