Influence of Parents and Friends on Children and Adolescents

This study has been completed.
Sponsor:
Information provided by:
University at Buffalo
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier:
NCT00875576
First received: April 2, 2009
Last updated: June 25, 2010
Last verified: April 2009
  Purpose

The objective of this study is to directly compare the effects of parents and friends on overweight and non-overweight children and adolescents' food intake and food selection using a cross-sectional design. Overweight and non-overweight children (5-6 year-old) and adolescents (13-14 year-old) will share a meal with a friend and with a parent on separate occasions. Participants' food selection and the amount of food they consumed will be compared across conditions.

Hypothesis 1: The investigators hypothesize that overweight children and adolescents will select more unhealthy food items and eat more in the presence of an overweight friend than when eating with a lean friend; whereas lean participants eating with an overweight friend will eat a similar amount of food than lean youth eating with a lean friend.

Hypothesis 2: The investigators predict that overweight children and adolescents (but not lean children and teens) will consume more food in the presence of their mother than in the presence of a friend.

Hypothesis 3: The investigators also predict that overweight youth's energy intake will be related to parental prompts.

Hypothesis 4: The investigators expect greater similarities in terms of food selection and food intake between adolescents and their friend than between adolescents and their parent.


Condition
Healthy

Study Type: Observational
Official Title: Influence of Parents and Friends on Children and Adolescents

Further study details as provided by University at Buffalo:

Primary Outcome Measures:
  • amount of food consumed [ Time Frame: Measured once with a friend and once with a mother, both occurring within a week of each other. ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]

Estimated Enrollment: 40
Study Start Date: January 2009
Study Completion Date: June 2010
Primary Completion Date: June 2010 (Final data collection date for primary outcome measure)
  Eligibility

Ages Eligible for Study:   5 Years to 14 Years
Genders Eligible for Study:   Both
Accepts Healthy Volunteers:   No
Sampling Method:   Probability Sample
Study Population

Boys and girls ages 5-6 yrs and 12-14 yrs and their mothers.

Criteria

Inclusion Criteria:

  • Boys and girls ages 5-6 yrs and 12-14 yrs and their mothers
  • Children must have a BMI greater than or equal to 15th percentile for their age
  • Children and their mothers must have at least a moderate liking of the study foods used

Exclusion Criteria:

  • Participants should not have any food allergies
  • Participants should have no dietary restraints
  • Participants should have no psychopathology that can limit food choice and alter eating
  • Participants should have no developmental disabilities that can limit food choice and alter eating
  • Participants cannot have a cold or upper respiratory distress that could influence taste, appetite or olfactory sensory responsiveness
  • Participants cannot be on any medications that could influence taste, appetite or olfactory sensory responsiveness
  Contacts and Locations
Please refer to this study by its ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT00875576

Locations
United States, New York
University at Buffalo, Division of Behavioral Medicine
Buffalo, New York, United States, 14214
Sponsors and Collaborators
University at Buffalo
Investigators
Principal Investigator: Sarah J Salvy, Ph.D. University at Buffalo
  More Information

No publications provided by University at Buffalo

Additional publications automatically indexed to this study by ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier (NCT Number):
Responsible Party: Sarah-Jeanne Salvy, Ph.D., University at Buffalo
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT00875576     History of Changes
Other Study ID Numbers: DB# 2354
Study First Received: April 2, 2009
Last Updated: June 25, 2010
Health Authority: United States: Institutional Review Board

Keywords provided by University at Buffalo:
social influences
meals
obesity
amount of food consumed

ClinicalTrials.gov processed this record on April 17, 2014