Interpregnancy Care Project-Mississippi (IPC-M)

This study is ongoing, but not recruiting participants.
Sponsor:
Collaborators:
Mississippi State Department of Health
Federally Qualified Community Health Centers
Information provided by (Responsible Party):
Glen Graves, University of Mississippi Medical Center
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier:
NCT00852319
First received: February 25, 2009
Last updated: January 18, 2013
Last verified: January 2013
  Purpose

The IPC program will enroll women who deliver Very Low Birth Weight babies (stillborn or liveborn) at University of Mississippi Medical Center and women who have Very Low Birth Weight babies that receive treatment in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit at University of Mississippi Medical Center and provide each woman with 24 months of funded comprehensive, integrated, primary health care services (including family planning, social services, general medical services,and basic dental care), and enhanced case management. The services will be community-based (via UMC Clinics, community health centers, and outreach programs) and will be provided by a multidisciplinary team of physicians, nurses, social workers, case managers, and Resource Mothers/Resource Workers. At the end of project follow-up, we will evaluate the success of the program in terms of improvement of general health status of enrolled women, and subsequent reproductive health outcomes (i.e., achieving reproductive intentions, intendedness and spacing of subsequent pregnancies, birth weight distribution of subsequent pregnancies) and cost of delivery services compared to reproductive health outcomes in the project's control population.


Condition Intervention
Premature Birth
Behavioral: Provision of Interpregnancy Care
Behavioral: Interpregnancy Care

Study Type: Interventional
Study Design: Allocation: Non-Randomized
Endpoint Classification: Efficacy Study
Intervention Model: Parallel Assignment
Masking: Open Label
Primary Purpose: Health Services Research
Official Title: Interpregnancy Care Project-Mississippi

Further study details as provided by University of Mississippi Medical Center:

Primary Outcome Measures:
  • The average number of pregnancies conceived within 18 months of the index delivery. [ Time Frame: The first 18 months the participant is enrolled in the study. ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]

Secondary Outcome Measures:
  • The average number of adverse outcomes for pregnancies conceived within 18 months of the index delivery. Adverse outcomes include such events as preterm birth, miscarriage, stillbirth, low birth weight, and small size based upon gestational age. [ Time Frame: The first 18 months the participants are enrolled in the program. ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
  • The health status of participants after participating in the study, highlighting the issues strongly associated with VLBW infants, such as diabetes, hypertension, and obesity. [ Time Frame: Health status is assessed throughout the study. ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
  • The financial costs and feasibility of providing interpregnancy care to this high-risk population. [ Time Frame: Over the course of this five-year study, the cost of providing interpregnancy care to this population will be compared to the general costs incurred by the control group that did not receive interpregnancy care. ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]

Estimated Enrollment: 300
Study Start Date: February 2009
Estimated Study Completion Date: December 2013
Estimated Primary Completion Date: December 2013 (Final data collection date for primary outcome measure)
Arms Assigned Interventions
Experimental: Central Mississippi group
Participants from central Mississippi are provided with 24 months of interpregnancy care. The results from this arm are compared to a historical control group (who were not given interpregnancy care) from the same geographical area in Mississippi.
Behavioral: Provision of Interpregnancy Care
The intervention package includes: 1) Creation of an individualized interpregnancy care plan based on assessments of risks for subsequent poor pregnancy outcomes; 2) Basic dental care and provision of primary health care services for 24 months; 3) Assistance in achieving a woman's desire for subsequent pregnancies and her need for optimum child spacing (ideally at least 18 months); 4) Provision of appropriate social services and community outreach in each woman's community.
Other Name: Interpregnancy Care
Experimental: Mississippi Delta group
Participants from 18 counties of the Mississippi delta are provided with 24 months of interpregnancy care. The results from this arm are compared to a historical control group (who were not given interpregnancy care) from the same geographical area in Mississippi.
Behavioral: Interpregnancy Care
The intervention package includes: 1) Creation of an individualized interpregnancy care plan based on assessments of risks for subsequent poor pregnancy outcomes; 2) Basic dental care and provision of primary health care services for 24 months; 3) Assistance in achieving a woman's desire for subsequent pregnancies and her need for optimum child spacing (ideally at least 18 months); 4) Provision of appropriate social services and community outreach in each woman's community.
Other Name: Interpregnancy Care

Detailed Description:

In the United States, Low Birth Weight (LBW; less than 2500 grams) delivery is the leading cause of infant mortality for African Americans. In addition, Very Low Birth Weight (VLBW; less than 1500 grams) deliveries frequently result in severe chronic health problems and lifelong disability in the surviving children. The racial disparity in infant mortality between African Americans and Caucasians is widening throughout the United States. Since Mississippi is the only state in the country with almost 50 percent of births to African Americans, the impact on Mississippi is dramatic. Recent research has focused on fetal origins of adult chronic diseases such as diabetes and hypertension. These findings confirm that poor pregnancy outcomes such as VLBW infants are often trans-generational problems. They are more common among women in poor health who lack continuous access to primary health care.

The best clinical predictor of a woman's delivery of a VLBW infant is her history of a previous VLBW delivery. The base line rate of very low birth weight for the general population is 1.5 percent of live births. After the first VLBW delivery, African American women have a 13.4 percent chance of another VLBW delivery. These figures are doubled in the case of teen pregnancies and progressively rise with each additional VLBW delivery. Mississippi has approximately 40,000 births per year; less than 2.5 percent (800) of these pregnancies result in 50 percent of infant deaths.

In Mississippi, Medicaid coverage is available to many women during their pregnancies, including a subset of women who do not financially qualify for Medicaid outside of pregnancy. The majority of these women lose Medicaid eligibility approximately 60 days after delivery; therefore, they do not have access to primary care resources. It appears that the strategy that offers the greatest potential for increasing a high risk woman's chance of having a full term healthy baby is preconceptual and inter-conceptual care.

The proposed project identifies and enrolls women in the Interpregnancy Care Project (IPC) of Mississippi at discharge from the hospital following the delivery of a VLBW infant. The IPC program provides 24 months of primary, continuous health care, basic dental care, enhanced nurse case management, and community outreach via a resource mother or resource worker. Primary health care addresses key areas epidemiologically linked to a VLBW delivery including the following: 1) reproductive planning and short interpregnancy intervals; 2) poorly-controlled chronic diseases; 3) reproductive tract infections; 4) nutritional disorders and obesity; 5) depression and domestic violence; 6) substance abuse; and 7) periodontal disease and cavities. Peer group meetings are integrated with IPC health care visits. Resource mothers and resource workers focus on parenthood preparedness, safe housing, job skills training, and education in the form of home visits and telephone contact.

  Eligibility

Ages Eligible for Study:   13 Years to 44 Years
Genders Eligible for Study:   Female
Accepts Healthy Volunteers:   No
Criteria

Inclusion Criteria:

  • African American female
  • Delivery of a VLBW (below 1500 grams) infant at University of Mississippi Medical Center; can be liveborn or stillborn
  • Transfer of an otherwise-qualifying VLBW infant to University of Mississippi Medical Center within two months of birth
  • Indigent or Medicaid-eligible during pregnancy
  • Maternal residence in Hinds county or in one of the 18 delta counties in Mississippi's Federal Health Districts I, III, or V

Exclusion Criteria:

  • Non-English speaking women
  • Pregnant women are excluded because the program is designed to study the benefits of providing primary health care services during the interpregnancy period
  • Women who are incarcerated or who are institutionally committed will be excluded because they will not be available to participate in the intervention package.
  Contacts and Locations
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Please refer to this study by its ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT00852319

Locations
United States, Mississippi
University of Mississippi Medical Center
Jackson, Mississippi, United States, 39216
Federally Qualified Community Health Centers
Jackson, Mississippi, United States, 39216
Mississippi State Department of Health
Jackson, Mississippi, United States, 39215
Sponsors and Collaborators
University of Mississippi Medical Center
Mississippi State Department of Health
Federally Qualified Community Health Centers
Investigators
Principal Investigator: Glen Graves, MD University of Mississippi Medical Center
  More Information

Publications:
Responsible Party: Glen Graves, Professor, University of Mississippi Medical Center
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT00852319     History of Changes
Other Study ID Numbers: 2009-0017
Study First Received: February 25, 2009
Last Updated: January 18, 2013
Health Authority: United States: Institutional Review Board

Keywords provided by University of Mississippi Medical Center:
Interpregnancy Care
Preconceptual Care
Premature Birth
Preterm Delivery

Additional relevant MeSH terms:
Premature Birth
Obstetric Labor, Premature
Obstetric Labor Complications
Pregnancy Complications

ClinicalTrials.gov processed this record on September 16, 2014