Epidemiology of Depression, Anxiety, and Cognitive Impairment

This study has been completed.
Sponsor:
Collaborator:
Information provided by:
University of Rochester
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier:
NCT00717041
First received: July 14, 2008
Last updated: February 19, 2009
Last verified: February 2009
  Purpose

Many older adults have undetected health problems and lack basic prevention measures. Failure to identify and treat these conditions can lead to unnecessary morbidity and mortality and a decreased quality of life. Traditional screening and intervention programs, usually based in primary care providers' offices, have been insufficient, particularly in medically underserved populations. Alternate sites for screening and intervention have begun to receive attention and may hold promise.

The emergency department (ED) is the entry point for access to medical and social services for many patients and has the potential to serve as a site to identify older adults with unmet needs. However, we do not know the prevalence of depression and cognitive impairment and how they differ by mode of arrival of the patient to the ED. Second, a question remains as to the validity of screening patients during an acute illness. Upon completion, this study will describe the epidemiology of the population of older adults presenting to the ED.


Condition
Depression
Anxiety
Cognitive Impairment

Study Type: Observational
Study Design: Observational Model: Cohort
Time Perspective: Prospective
Official Title: Epidemiology of Depression, Anxiety, and Cognitive Impairment Among Emergency Department Patients

Resource links provided by NLM:


Further study details as provided by University of Rochester:

Primary Outcome Measures:
  • Depression by PHQ9 [ Time Frame: 2 hours ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
  • Cognitive Impairment by Six Item Screener [ Time Frame: 2 hours ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
  • Anxiety by GAD-7 [ Time Frame: 2 hours ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]

Secondary Outcome Measures:
  • Reliability of each measure at 2 weeks, 6 months. [ Time Frame: 6 months ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]

Estimated Enrollment: 1600
Study Start Date: May 2008
Study Completion Date: February 2009
Primary Completion Date: September 2008 (Final data collection date for primary outcome measure)
Groups/Cohorts
1
High acuity EMS patients
2
Low acuity EMS patients
3
High acuity ambulatory patients
4
Low acuity ambulatory patients

Detailed Description:

Many older adults have undetected health problems and lack basic prevention measures. Failure to identify and treat these conditions can lead to unnecessary morbidity and mortality and a decreased quality of life. Traditional screening and intervention programs, usually based in primary care providers' offices, have been insufficient, particularly in medically underserved populations. Alternate sites for screening and intervention have begun to receive attention and may hold promise.

The emergency department (ED) is the entry point for access to medical and social services for many patients and has the potential to serve as a site to identify older adults with unmet needs. However, we do not know the prevalence of depression and cognitive impairment and how they differ by mode of arrival of the patient to the ED. Second, a question remains as to the validity of screening patients during an acute illness. This study aims to:

  1. Compare the prevalence of depression and cognitive impairment among patients who arrive at the ED by EMS, as compared to those arriving via other means.
  2. Evaluate the reliability of screening patients for depression and cognitive impairment during an acute illness and after the illness.
  3. To evaluate correlates of depression, anxiety and suicidal ideation. Upon completion, this study will describe the epidemiology of the population of older adults presenting to the ED.
  Eligibility

Ages Eligible for Study:   60 Years and older
Genders Eligible for Study:   Both
Accepts Healthy Volunteers:   No
Sampling Method:   Non-Probability Sample
Study Population

All older adults arriving at participating hospital emergency departments to obtain emergency care.

Criteria

Inclusion Criteria:

  • Age 60 and older
  • Arrival at ED

Exclusion Criteria:

  • Institutionalized
  Contacts and Locations
Choosing to participate in a study is an important personal decision. Talk with your doctor and family members or friends about deciding to join a study. To learn more about this study, you or your doctor may contact the study research staff using the Contacts provided below. For general information, see Learn About Clinical Studies.

Please refer to this study by its ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT00717041

Locations
United States, New York
University of Rochester
Rochester, New York, United States, 14646
Sponsors and Collaborators
University of Rochester
Investigators
Principal Investigator: Manish N. Shah, MD MPH University of Rochester
  More Information

No publications provided

Responsible Party: Manish N. Shah, MD MPH, University of Rochester
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT00717041     History of Changes
Other Study ID Numbers: RSRB 24085, NIH 5K23AG028942
Study First Received: July 14, 2008
Last Updated: February 19, 2009
Health Authority: United States: Institutional Review Board

Keywords provided by University of Rochester:
Depression
Anxiety
Cognitive Impairment
Emergency medicine
prehospital care

Additional relevant MeSH terms:
Anxiety Disorders
Depression
Depressive Disorder
Cognition Disorders
Mental Disorders
Behavioral Symptoms
Mood Disorders
Delirium, Dementia, Amnestic, Cognitive Disorders

ClinicalTrials.gov processed this record on August 25, 2014