Organizing the Information Given to Parents of NICU Infants in Order to Reduce Their Anxiety

This study has been withdrawn prior to enrollment.
(After a discussion, we decided to withdraw the study.)
Sponsor:
Information provided by:
Hillel Yaffe Medical Center
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier:
NCT00699127
First received: June 14, 2008
Last updated: July 3, 2008
Last verified: July 2008
  Purpose

Being a parent to a premature infant in NICU is an anxious state. Parents ask a lot of questions, and look for information all the time. Organizing the information given to parents could reduce their anxiety. The parents will be divided into two groups: one group will get organized information, by a lecture at the first week of their infant's life, and the other group will not. Of course, questions will be answered all the time. The parents will answer a questionnaire on the first week of the infant's life, and on the last week, just before releasing the infant home.


Condition Intervention
Anxiety
Behavioral: Lecture

Study Type: Interventional
Study Design: Allocation: Randomized
Intervention Model: Parallel Assignment
Masking: Open Label
Primary Purpose: Supportive Care
Official Title: Dose Organizing the Information Given to Parents of NICU Infants Reduce Their Anxiety?

Resource links provided by NLM:


Further study details as provided by Hillel Yaffe Medical Center:

Primary Outcome Measures:
  • Difference between questionnaires at the first week and the last week to hospitalization. [ Time Frame: 1 year ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]

Enrollment: 0
Study Start Date: July 2008
Estimated Study Completion Date: July 2008
Estimated Primary Completion Date: July 2008 (Final data collection date for primary outcome measure)
Arms Assigned Interventions
Experimental: 1
The group that will have lecture of information regarding infants in NICU.
Behavioral: Lecture
Lecture of information regarding prematurity, NICU hospitalization, etc.
No Intervention: 2
The group that will not have lecture of information regarding NICU hospitalization

Detailed Description:

Being a parent to a premature infant in NICU is an anxious state. Parents ask a lot of questions, and look for information all the time. Organizing the information given to parents could reduce their anxiety. The parents will be divided into two groups: one group will get organized information, by a lecture at the first week of their infant's life, and the other group will not. Of course, questions will be answered all the time. The parents will answer a questionnaire on the first week of the infant's life, and on the last week, just before releasing the infant home.

  Eligibility

Ages Eligible for Study:   up to 4 Months
Genders Eligible for Study:   Both
Accepts Healthy Volunteers:   Yes
Criteria

Inclusion Criteria:

  • Parents to premature infants, after releasing the mother

Exclusion Criteria:

  • Term infants
  • Hospitalized mother
  Contacts and Locations
Choosing to participate in a study is an important personal decision. Talk with your doctor and family members or friends about deciding to join a study. To learn more about this study, you or your doctor may contact the study research staff using the Contacts provided below. For general information, see Learn About Clinical Studies.

Please refer to this study by its ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT00699127

Locations
Israel
Hillel Yaffe medical center
Hadera, Israel, 38100
Sponsors and Collaborators
Hillel Yaffe Medical Center
Investigators
Study Chair: Erez Nadir, MD Hillel Yaffe medical center, Hadera, Israel
  More Information

No publications provided

Responsible Party: Erez Nadir, MD, Hillel Yaffe medical center
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT00699127     History of Changes
Other Study ID Numbers: HY-19-2008-CTIL
Study First Received: June 14, 2008
Last Updated: July 3, 2008
Health Authority: Israel: Ministry of Health

Keywords provided by Hillel Yaffe Medical Center:
anxiety
parents
NICU
prematurity
Anxiety of parents to NICU infants

Additional relevant MeSH terms:
Anxiety Disorders
Mental Disorders

ClinicalTrials.gov processed this record on August 28, 2014