Self-dispersing Liquids as Aerosol Drug Carriers

This study has been completed.
Sponsor:
Collaborator:
Cystic Fibrosis Foundation
Information provided by (Responsible Party):
University of Pittsburgh
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier:
NCT00628134
First received: February 22, 2008
Last updated: September 3, 2013
Last verified: September 2013
  Purpose

Inhaled medications are often used to treat lung diseases such as cystic fibrosis. We are performing this study to determine whether inhaled medications dissolved in surfactant-based solutions will distribute more evenly throughout the lungs when compared to standard saline-based solutions. We think that inhaling medication that is in a surfactant-based liquid will result in more medication reaching partially blocked parts of the lung. This study will use a special nuclear medicine test called an aerosol deposition scan to compare how a drug spreads in the lung using a surfactant-based aerosol compared to a saline-based aerosol.


Condition Intervention
Cystic Fibrosis
Drug: calfactant aerosol
Drug: isotonic saline aerosol

Study Type: Interventional
Study Design: Allocation: Randomized
Intervention Model: Single Group Assignment
Masking: Single Blind (Outcomes Assessor)
Primary Purpose: Basic Science
Official Title: Self-dispersing Liquids as Aerosol Drug Carriers

Resource links provided by NLM:


Further study details as provided by University of Pittsburgh:

Primary Outcome Measures:
  • Uniformity of Aerosol Distribution [ Time Frame: 30 minutes ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
    Measured change in central/peripheral (c/p) dose ratio over a 30 minute period after aersol delivery (c/p at t=30 - c/p at t=0). Central and peripheral lung doses are measured as radioactive counts depicted on nuclear medicine gamma camera images after radioisotope aerosol delivery. The central lung zone is a rectangle with 1/2 the height and 1/2 the width of a box outlining the whole right lung. The peripheral lung zone is defined as the portion of the lung outside of the central lung zone. A change in c/p ratio over time would indicate transport of material from one lung zone to the other. The variable represents the realtive proportion of airways dosing to alveolar dosing - an indication of deposition uniformity in the lungs.


Secondary Outcome Measures:
  • Peripheral Lung Dose [ Time Frame: 30 minutes after delivery ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
    Change over 30 minutes in the percentage of the total deposited aerosol dose found in the peripheral lung zone. We are reporting the %peripheral dose at t=30 minus the %peripheral dose at t=0. This dose is determined based on measured radioactive counts after aerosol delivery, using nuclear medicine gamma camera images. The central lung zone is defined as a rectangle with 1/2 the height and 1/2 the width of a rectangle that surrounds the right whole lung. The peripheral zone is the portion of the lung image not included in the central lung zone.


Enrollment: 8
Study Start Date: March 2008
Study Completion Date: August 2009
Primary Completion Date: August 2009 (Final data collection date for primary outcome measure)
Arms Assigned Interventions
Experimental: 1
Subjects with cystic fibrosis
Drug: calfactant aerosol
single inhaled dose by nebulizer
Drug: isotonic saline aerosol
single inhaled dose by nebulizer

Detailed Description:

Cystic fibrosis (CF) is an inherited chronic disease that affects the lungs and digestive system of about 30,000 children and adults in the United States (70,000 worldwide). The lungs of a person with cystic fibrosis often contain thick sticky mucus that can clog the lungs and lead to life-threatening lung infections. A major milestone in the treatment of CF was the development of an inhaled form of an antibiotic drug called tobramycin. For an inhaled antibiotic to work it must be delivered to all infected parts of the lung. Many studies have shown that blockages in the lungs, like those found in CF patients, can prevent inhaled medicines from reaching all parts of the lungs.

Usually aerosolized medications are dissolved in saline or water. Most of these medications could be dissolved in surfactant solutions and aerosolized. Soaps are common examples of surfactants. Surfactants may have the ability to spread medication over the inside surface of the lungs similar to the way dish soap spreads over water. We think that inhaling medication that is in a surfactant-based liquid will result in more medication reaching partially blocked parts of the lung. We further believe that the normal movements of the lung associated with breathing will further spread surfactant-based aerosol medications, and contribute to even more even drug distribution over longer periods of time.

A surfactant-based inhaled antibiotic would have the potential to reach more sites of infection in the lung, possibly getting rid of infection all together. This study will use a special test called an aerosol deposition scan to compare how a drug spreads in the lung using a surfactant-based aerosol compared to a saline-based aerosol. The study includes one screening and two testing visits.

  Eligibility

Ages Eligible for Study:   18 Years and older
Genders Eligible for Study:   Both
Accepts Healthy Volunteers:   No
Criteria

Inclusion Criteria:

  • Age ≥ 18 years
  • Diagnosis of cystic fibrosis as determined by sweat test or genotype and clinical symptoms
  • Clinically stable as determined by the investigator (pulmonologist).

Exclusion Criteria:

  • Known allergies to any of the administered components (as described by subjects or based on positive RAST test to bovine serum albumin)
  • Any past instances of bronchospasm associated with aerosol medications
  • FEV1 < 60% predicted
  • Positive urine pregnancy test (as administered to all female subjects of childbearing potential on testing days)
  • Currently a nursing mother
  • History of reactive airways disease associated with significant instances of bronchoconstriction
  • Self-reported smoking history within the last 6 months.
  • Subjects receiving any treatments or diagnostic procedures involving radioisotopes within the last 30 days.
  • Subjects in the CF arm of the study will also be excluded if their pre-study pulmonary function test (FEV1) is more than 15% depressed from their last baseline pulmonary function test, if this baseline value is from within the last 6 months, or if they have experienced an exacerbation requiring hospitalization or treatment with an IV antibiotic within the last month.
  Contacts and Locations
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Please refer to this study by its ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT00628134

Locations
United States, Pennsylvania
University of Pittsburgh Medical Center
Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, United States, 15213
Sponsors and Collaborators
University of Pittsburgh
Cystic Fibrosis Foundation
Investigators
Principal Investigator: Tim Corcoran, Ph.D. University of Pittsburgh
  More Information

Publications:
Responsible Party: University of Pittsburgh
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT00628134     History of Changes
Other Study ID Numbers: PRO07090095, CORCOR07A0
Study First Received: February 22, 2008
Results First Received: June 19, 2013
Last Updated: September 3, 2013
Health Authority: United States: Institutional Review Board

Keywords provided by University of Pittsburgh:
cystic fibrosis
surfactant
aerosol
inhaled drug
inhaled antibiotic

Additional relevant MeSH terms:
Cystic Fibrosis
Fibrosis
Pancreatic Diseases
Digestive System Diseases
Lung Diseases
Respiratory Tract Diseases
Genetic Diseases, Inborn
Infant, Newborn, Diseases
Pathologic Processes
Calfactant
Pulmonary Surfactants
Respiratory System Agents
Therapeutic Uses
Pharmacologic Actions

ClinicalTrials.gov processed this record on July 20, 2014