The Effect of Long-Chain Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids on Cognitive Performance and Mood

This study has been completed.
Sponsor:
Collaborators:
Philipps University Marburg Medical Center
Cognitive Drug Research Ltd
Information provided by:
University of Ulm
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier:
NCT00615277
First received: February 1, 2008
Last updated: February 13, 2008
Last verified: February 2008
  Purpose

The study investigates whether dietary intake of omega-3 long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids affects learning and mood of healthy young adults.


Condition Intervention
Healthy
Dietary Supplement: Omega-3 fatty acids

Study Type: Interventional
Study Design: Allocation: Randomized
Intervention Model: Parallel Assignment
Masking: Double Blind (Subject, Investigator, Outcomes Assessor)
Primary Purpose: Basic Science
Official Title: The Effect of Long-Chain Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids on Cognitive Performance and Mood of Healthy Young Adults

Resource links provided by NLM:


Further study details as provided by University of Ulm:

Primary Outcome Measures:
  • Cognition [ Time Frame: Before intervention and after 16 weeks of intervention ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]

Secondary Outcome Measures:
  • Mood [ Time Frame: Before intervention and after 16 weeks of intervention ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]

Enrollment: 82
Study Start Date: October 2006
Primary Completion Date: January 2007 (Final data collection date for primary outcome measure)
Arms Assigned Interventions
Active Comparator: 1
1: omega-3 fatty acid supplement
Dietary Supplement: Omega-3 fatty acids
600 mg EPA 120mg DHA daily, 16 weeks
Placebo Comparator: 2
2: olive oil
Dietary Supplement: Omega-3 fatty acids
600 mg EPA 120mg DHA daily, 16 weeks

Detailed Description:

The long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (LCPUFA) EPA (eicosapentaenoic acid), DHA (docosahexaenoic acid) of the omega-3 series and AA (arachidonic acid) of the omega-6 series are building blocks of all cell membranes and are found in high concentrations in retina and brain. Food sources of LA and ALA are vegetable oils, nuts and seeds. Since low conversion rates from ALA to DHA are a characteristic of human metabolism, adequate dietary provision with the long-chained omega-3 molecules depends primarily on individual eating habits. While AA is abundant in meat and dairy products, EPA and DHA are found in noteworthy concentrations only in certain species of fatty fish, such as salmon or mackerel.

The study investigates whether participants receiving an omega-3 supplement over a period of 4 month, perform better on a series of cognitive tests, than the participants allocated to the placebo group.

  Eligibility

Ages Eligible for Study:   16 Years to 24 Years
Genders Eligible for Study:   Both
Accepts Healthy Volunteers:   Yes
Criteria

Inclusion Criteria:

  • Healthy young adults

Exclusion Criteria:

  • Coagulation disorder
  Contacts and Locations
Please refer to this study by its ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT00615277

Sponsors and Collaborators
University of Ulm
Philipps University Marburg Medical Center
Cognitive Drug Research Ltd
Investigators
Principal Investigator: Katharina A Widenhorn-Mueller, PhD University of Ulm
Principal Investigator: Ulrike Weiland, MD University of Ulm
  More Information

No publications provided

Responsible Party: Prof. Dr. Dr. Manfred Spitzer, University of Ulm
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT00615277     History of Changes
Other Study ID Numbers: 213/2005, 213/2005
Study First Received: February 1, 2008
Last Updated: February 13, 2008
Health Authority: Germany: Ethics Commission

Keywords provided by University of Ulm:
Young adults
Long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids
Cognitive function
Mood
Supply with omega-3 fatty acids

ClinicalTrials.gov processed this record on April 17, 2014