Effect of Simulation on PALS Training

This study has been completed.
Sponsor:
Collaborator:
Laerdal Medical
Information provided by:
Children's Hospital of Philadelphia
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier:
NCT00562744
First received: November 21, 2007
Last updated: NA
Last verified: November 2007
History: No changes posted
  Purpose

Patient simulation is a new and expanding technology that has proven effective as a teaching tool in various clinical settings, but data on pediatric simulation is lacking. Mock resuscitation scenarios have been shown in prior studies to be effective for improving knowledge, skill, and confidence in pediatric housestaff. Our objective is to assess the utility of a training program utilizing a human patient simulator of an infant as a teaching tool for pediatric housestaff training in resuscitation skills. We hypothesize that mock resuscitation exercises performed by pediatric housestaff on a patient simulator will result in improved performance on test scenarios when compared to the same training on a standard manikin.


Condition Intervention
Pediatric Housestaff
Other: Simulation

Study Type: Interventional
Study Design: Allocation: Randomized
Endpoint Classification: Efficacy Study
Intervention Model: Parallel Assignment
Masking: Open Label
Official Title: The Effect of High-Fidelity Simulation on Pediatric Advanced Life Support Training in Pediatric Housestaff: a Randomized Trial

Further study details as provided by Children's Hospital of Philadelphia:

Primary Outcome Measures:
  • Cognitive performance in mock resuscitation scenarios [ Time Frame: immediate ]

Enrollment: 51
Study Start Date: January 2006
Study Completion Date: September 2007
Arms Assigned Interventions
Experimental: SIM
Participants complete training and assessment of performance in PALS scenarios using high-fidelity simulator
Other: Simulation
Use of high-fidelity patient simulator for training and assessment of PALS scenario performance
No Intervention: MAN
Participants complete training and assessment of performance in PALS scenarios using mannequin

Detailed Description:

Patient simulation is a new and expanding technology that has proven effective as a teaching tool in various clinical settings, but data on pediatric simulation is lacking. Mock resuscitation scenarios have been shown in prior studies to be effective for improving knowledge, skill, and confidence in pediatric housestaff. Our objective is to assess the utility of a training program utilizing a human patient simulator of an infant as a teaching tool for pediatric housestaff training in resuscitation skills. We hypothesize that mock resuscitation exercises performed by pediatric housestaff on a patient simulator will result in improved performance on test scenarios when compared to the same training on a standard manikin.

We propose a randomized trial of pediatric residents of identical training levels from three children's hospitals. Participants will be assigned to a control group or an intervention group. The control group will undertake mock resuscitation scenarios on a standard manikin; the intervention group will perform the same exercises on a simulator. A test scenario will be administered at the end of each set of training scenarios and frequency and timing of a predetermined list of critical clinical assessments and interventions will be recorded. Analysis will consist of a comparison between control and intervention groups for success rates and time to completion for clinical assessments and interventions.

  Eligibility

Genders Eligible for Study:   Both
Accepts Healthy Volunteers:   Yes
Criteria

Inclusion Criteria:

  • PGY 1 or 2 in pediatrics at CHOP, St. Christopher's Hospital for Children, or A.I. DuPont Hospital for Children
  Contacts and Locations
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Please refer to this study by its ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT00562744

Locations
United States, Pennsylvania
CHOP
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, United States, 19104
Sponsors and Collaborators
Children's Hospital of Philadelphia
Laerdal Medical
Investigators
Principal Investigator: Aaron Donoghue, MD, MSCE CHOP
  More Information

No publications provided

ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT00562744     History of Changes
Other Study ID Numbers: 2005-9-4379
Study First Received: November 21, 2007
Last Updated: November 21, 2007
Health Authority: United States: Institutional Review Board

ClinicalTrials.gov processed this record on October 01, 2014