Influence of Therapeutic Hypothermia on Resting Energy Expenditure

This study has been completed.
Sponsor:
Information provided by:
Medical University of Vienna
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier:
NCT00500825
First received: July 11, 2007
Last updated: May 15, 2008
Last verified: May 2008
  Purpose

The purpose of this study is the evaluation of the influence of therapeutic hypothermia on resting energy expenditure (REE) in patients after cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). We hypothesized that hypothermia would reduce resting energy expenditure in these patients.


Condition Intervention
Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation
Procedure: Measurement of Resting Energy Expenditure

Study Type: Observational
Study Design: Observational Model: Cohort
Time Perspective: Prospective
Official Title: Influence of Therapeutic Hypothermia on Resting Energy Expenditure in Patients After Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation

Resource links provided by NLM:


Further study details as provided by Medical University of Vienna:

Enrollment: 25
Study Start Date: July 2005
Study Completion Date: May 2008
Primary Completion Date: March 2008 (Final data collection date for primary outcome measure)
Groups/Cohorts Assigned Interventions
1
Patients successfully resuscitated after cardiac arrest undergoing therapeutic hypothermia
Procedure: Measurement of Resting Energy Expenditure
Non-invasive measurement of Resting Energy Expenditure
Other Name: Deltatrac (Ohmeda)

Detailed Description:

Therapeutic hypothermia improves neurologic outcome in patients after cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) because of cardiac arrest. In the present study patients will be cooled to 33 degree Celsius after CPR for 24h. To avoid shivering patients will be analgosedated and medically paralysed. Analgosedation and relaxation have already shown to reduce oxygen consumption up to 20 % in critically ill patients.

In patients with brain injury, who were cooled to 33 degree Celsius using a cooling meadow REE could be significantly reduced. In critically ill patients with pyrexia cooling using a cooling meadow REE could be reduced. Oxygen consumption was reduced about 14,7% per degree Celsius.

So far no studies evaluating influence of therapeutic hypothermia on REE in patients after CPR have been published. Therefore we plan to measure REE in 25 cooled patients after CPR using indirect Calorimetry (Deltatrac II Metabolic Monitor, Datex Instrumentarium, Helsinki, Finland).

  Eligibility

Ages Eligible for Study:   18 Years and older
Genders Eligible for Study:   Both
Accepts Healthy Volunteers:   No
Sampling Method:   Non-Probability Sample
Study Population

Residents of Vienna

Criteria

Inclusion Criteria:

  • St.p. CPR
  • Indication for therapeutic hypothermia for 24h (33 degrees Celsius)

Exclusion Criteria:

  • Contraindication for therapeutic hypothermia
  Contacts and Locations
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Please refer to this study by its ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT00500825

Locations
Austria
Medical University Vienna
Vienna, Austria, 1090
Sponsors and Collaborators
Medical University of Vienna
Investigators
Principal Investigator: Ulrike Holzinger, MD Medical University Vienna
  More Information

No publications provided

Responsible Party: Dr. Ulrike Holzinger, Medical University of Vienna
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT00500825     History of Changes
Other Study ID Numbers: 486/2003
Study First Received: July 11, 2007
Last Updated: May 15, 2008
Health Authority: Austria: Ethikkommission

Keywords provided by Medical University of Vienna:
Cardiopulmonary resuscitation
Therapeutic hypothermia
resting energy expenditure

Additional relevant MeSH terms:
Hypothermia
Body Temperature Changes
Signs and Symptoms

ClinicalTrials.gov processed this record on July 22, 2014