The Effect of Amputation on Spatial Visual Representation in Peripersonal Space

The recruitment status of this study is unknown because the information has not been verified recently.
Verified March 2007 by Hadassah Medical Organization.
Recruitment status was  Not yet recruiting
Sponsor:
Information provided by:
Hadassah Medical Organization
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier:
NCT00458757
First received: April 10, 2007
Last updated: May 12, 2008
Last verified: March 2007
  Purpose

In this study, we wish to find behavioral evidence for the question whether an amputation of the arm can lead to changes in visual perception or motor responses to objects in peripersonal space. We hypothesize that changes in the motor and somatosensory hand-related cortices following amputation might lead to changes in parietal hand-related areas. The consequence of these parietal changes should be reflected behaviorally in reduced perception/attention/responses to hand-related objects in the space ipsilateral to the amputation. We further hypothesize that the use of prosthetics may provide the necessary visual feedback to maintain an intact hand representation and therefore lead to lesser cortical reorganization in both visual and somatosensory cortical areas.


Condition
Upper Limb Amputees

Study Type: Observational
Study Design: Observational Model: Case Control
Time Perspective: Prospective
Official Title: The Effect of Upper Arm Amputation and the Use of Prosthetics on Spatial Visual Representation in Peripersonal Space - a Behavioural Study

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Further study details as provided by Hadassah Medical Organization:

Estimated Enrollment: 40
Study Start Date: November 2007
Detailed Description:

In a recent fMRI study (Makin TR. et al., J. Neurosci. 2007), we found extended cortical representation for a visual stimulus provided that it is presented close to the hand. It is therefore interesting to ask whether changes in the brain following limb amputation might induce changes in the amputees' perception of the body and consequently it's surrounding. In this study, we wish to find behavioral evidence for the question whether an amputation of the arm can lead to changes in visual perception or motor responses to objects in peripersonal space. We hypothesize that changes in the motor and somatosensory hand-related cortices following amputation might lead to changes in parietal hand-related areas. Consequently, we expect to find reduced perception/attention/responses to hand-related objects in the space ipsilateral to the amputation.

In this experiment we plan to employ a paradigm which is inspired by the affordance effect, originally introduced by Tucker and Elice (1998): we will present subjects with brief images of either manipulable or non manipulable objects in either the left or right visual field. The subjects will be required to determine whether the object contains a metal or not, by moving either their left or their right shoulder. We predict that while the control group of normal subjects would show a congruency effect (that is superior performance (faster and more accurate responses) when the responding shoulder is congruent with the position of the objects, the amputees will show spatial biases towards the non-amputated side. This effect should be more prominent for the manipulable objects.

  Eligibility

Ages Eligible for Study:   18 Years and older
Genders Eligible for Study:   Both
Accepts Healthy Volunteers:   Yes
Sampling Method:   Non-Probability Sample
Study Population

In this experiment we plan to employ a paradigm which is inspired by the affordance effect, originally introduced by Tucker and Elice (1998): we will present subjects with brief images of either manipulable or non manipulable objects in either the left or right visual field. The subjects will be required to determine whether the object contains a metal or not, by moving either their left or their right shoulder. We predict that while the control group of normal subjects would show a congruency effect (that is superior performance (faster and more accurate responses) when the responding shoulder is congruent with the position of the objects, the amputees will show spatial biases towards the non-amputated side. This effect should be more prominent for the manipulable objects.

Criteria

Inclusion Criteria:

  • Upper limb amputee, amputation above wrist.
  Contacts and Locations
Please refer to this study by its ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT00458757

Contacts
Contact: Isabella Schuartz, MD 00 972 50 8573783 isabellas@hadassah.org.il

Locations
Israel
Neurobiology Dep., Life Sciences Institute, Hebrew Uni.
Jerusalem, Israel, 91904
Sponsors and Collaborators
Hadassah Medical Organization
Investigators
Principal Investigator: Isabella Schuartz, MD Rehabilitation Dep. Hadassah Medical Hospital, Mount Scopus, Jerusalem
  More Information

Publications:
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT00458757     History of Changes
Other Study ID Numbers: 090767-amputy-HMO-CTIL
Study First Received: April 10, 2007
Last Updated: May 12, 2008
Health Authority: Israel: Israeli Health Ministry Pharmaceutical Administration

Keywords provided by Hadassah Medical Organization:
Amputees
Affordance
Peripersonal space
Pseudo neglect
Reaching
Spatial
visual

ClinicalTrials.gov processed this record on April 16, 2014