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Effectiveness of Human Simulation Training for Medical Crisis Management Skills

The recruitment status of this study is unknown because the information has not been verified recently.
Verified December 2007 by University of Pittsburgh.
Recruitment status was  Active, not recruiting
Sponsor:
Information provided by:
University of Pittsburgh
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier:
NCT00425295
First received: January 19, 2007
Last updated: December 12, 2007
Last verified: December 2007
  Purpose

The main purpose of this study is to assess the effectiveness of human simulation in the training of the leadership, cognitive, and psychomotor skills required to lead medical crisis management teams. All participants in the study are trainees in the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center (UPMC) Multi-Disciplinary Critical Care Training Program (MCCTP.) All trainees will have received the standard critical care medicine-training curriculum including basic airway management, management of hypotension, unstable cardiac arrhythmias, difficult airway management and crisis team training. The participants will have also completed six months of baseline clinical training, which includes responding to medical emergencies at UPMC.

The specific aims of this study are:

  1. To assess the effectiveness of Human Simulation Training (HST) as an educational tool for teaching medical crisis management.
  2. To determine the effect of HST on objective measures of performance in the domains of communication, leadership, cognition and psychomotor skills.

Condition Intervention Phase
Education
Behavioral: Human Simulation Training
Phase 1

Study Type: Interventional
Study Design: Allocation: Randomized
Endpoint Classification: Efficacy Study
Intervention Model: Crossover Assignment
Masking: Single Blind (Outcomes Assessor)
Official Title: Effectiveness of Human Simulation Training for Medical Crisis Management Skills

Resource links provided by NLM:


Further study details as provided by University of Pittsburgh:

Primary Outcome Measures:
  • To assess the effectiveness of Human Simulation Training (HST) as an educational tool for teaching medical crisis management through objective measures of performance in the domains of communication, leadership, cognition and psychomotor skills. [ Time Frame: 6 week intervals. ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]

Estimated Enrollment: 20
Study Start Date: October 2006
Estimated Study Completion Date: June 2007
Arms Assigned Interventions
Active Comparator: 1 Behavioral: Human Simulation Training
Fellows will undergo Human Simulation Training (HST) composed of one 1 hour session of high-fidelity simulation of crisis scenarios requiring management of critical care skills, including triage, Advanced Cardiac Life Support (ACLS), team management, and difficult airway management.
Experimental: 2 Behavioral: Human Simulation Training
Fellows will undergo Human Simulation Training (HST) composed of one 1 hour session of high-fidelity simulation of crisis scenarios requiring management of critical care skills, including triage, Advanced Cardiac Life Support (ACLS), team management, and difficult airway management.

  Show Detailed Description

  Eligibility

Ages Eligible for Study:   18 Years to 65 Years
Genders Eligible for Study:   Both
Accepts Healthy Volunteers:   Yes
Criteria

Inclusion Criteria:

  • All consenting adult critical care medicine trainees at the MCCTP

Exclusion Criteria:

  • Academic probation within training program
  Contacts and Locations
Choosing to participate in a study is an important personal decision. Talk with your doctor and family members or friends about deciding to join a study. To learn more about this study, you or your doctor may contact the study research staff using the Contacts provided below. For general information, see Learn About Clinical Studies.

Please refer to this study by its ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT00425295

Locations
United States, Pennsylvania
University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, Presbyterian Hospital
Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, United States, 15261
Sponsors and Collaborators
University of Pittsburgh
Investigators
Principal Investigator: Ramesh Venkataraman, MD Department of Critical Care Mediine, University of Pittsburgh Medical Center
Principal Investigator: Lillian L Emlet, MD University of Pittsburgh
  More Information

No publications provided

Responsible Party: Lillian L. Emlet, MD, University of Pittsburgh Medical Center
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT00425295     History of Changes
Other Study ID Numbers: 0501050
Study First Received: January 19, 2007
Last Updated: December 12, 2007
Health Authority: United States: Institutional Review Board

ClinicalTrials.gov processed this record on November 20, 2014