Indiaclen Short Course Amoxycillin Therapy for Pneumonia With Wheeze

This study has been completed.
Sponsor:
Collaborator:
United States Agency for International Development (USAID)
Information provided by:
King George's Medical University
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier:
NCT00407394
First received: December 2, 2006
Last updated: NA
Last verified: December 2006
History: No changes posted
  Purpose

Background: The current Integrated management of childhood infections (IMCI) algorithm prescribes that children with wheeze and fast breathing presenting to first level health facilities are given antibiotics if they continue to have fast breathing after two doses of bronchodilator. The primary purpose of the algorithm is to prevent mortality due to bacterial pneumonia. However, an unknown proportion of children managed in this fashion will have a viral related wheezing illness or asthma rather than pneumonia. Although it is unlikely that wheezing syndromes are a significant cause of mortality for children in developing countries, these algorithms are likely to result in unnecessary administration of antibiotics as well as inadequate treatment of recurrent wheezing illness. We do not have clear evidence about whether antibiotics can be withheld in some categories of children with wheeze. It is clear that wheeze can occur in bacterial infection and in addition co-infection with virus and bacteria has been well demonstrated in several studies of pneumonia etiology in children. Although some studies have found that children with more severe disease or who are blood culture positive are more likely to be febrile at presentation, this sign is not sufficiently sensitive or specific to determine whether antibiotics should be administeredSetting: The study will be conducted in eight medical colleges situated in Lucknow, Nagpur, New Delhi, Mumbai, Chennai, Trivandrum, Vellore, and Chandigarh. Design: This will be a multicentric, randomized, double blind efficacy trial. . Hypothesis: The primary hypothesis is that the use of oral amoxycillin for three days would be as effective, in terms of clinical cure on day 4 as compared to use of oral placeboMain objective: To compare the proportion of children aged 2 to 59 months presenting with non-severe pneumonia with wheeze whose respiratory rate does not fall below the age specific cut-off after three doses of nebulized salbutamol, that achieve clinical cure on day 4 on 3 day of treatment with oral amoxycillin versus placebo.Inclusion criteria: Children aged 2-59 months with non-severe pneumonia based on WHO criteria of respiratory rate above the age specific cut-off, audible / ausculatory wheeze. Exclusion criteria: Children with severe disease, received any documented antibiotic treatment in the past 48 hours, diagnosed asthmatic on maintenance therapy, complicating acute non-pulmonary or chronic illness, known drug allergy, hospitalization in the past 2 weeks, history of measles within the last month, known immunodeficiency disorder, prior enrollment in the study, residing in areas not accessible for follow-up or whose guardian refuses to consent for the study. Sample size: Has been calculated to test the null hypothesis. There will be 950 children in each arm. Thus each site is required to recruit a minimum of 225 cases over 18 months.


Condition Intervention Phase
Non-Severe Pneumonia With Wheeze
Drug: Amoxycillin
Phase 3

Study Type: Interventional
Study Design: Allocation: Randomized
Endpoint Classification: Efficacy Study
Intervention Model: Parallel Assignment
Masking: Double-Blind
Primary Purpose: Treatment
Official Title: Randomized Double Blind Placebo Controlled Trial of Amoxycillin in the Treatment of Non-Severe Pneumonia With Wheeze in Children Aged 2- 59 Months of Age: A Multi-Centric Study

Resource links provided by NLM:


Further study details as provided by King George's Medical University:

Primary Outcome Measures:
  • Clinical Cure: Respiratory rate below age specific cut-off (<50 bpm in infants <12 months and <40 bpm in 12 – 59 months of age).

Secondary Outcome Measures:
  • Clinical failure: Any signs of severe pneumonia or severe disease; chest in drawing, convulsions, drowsiness or inability to drink at any time; Respiratory rate above age specific cut-off on day 4 or after that; Oxygen saturation on pulse oximetry <90%

Estimated Enrollment: 2000
Study Start Date: April 2004
Estimated Study Completion Date: April 2006
  Show Detailed Description

  Eligibility

Ages Eligible for Study:   2 Months to 59 Months
Genders Eligible for Study:   Both
Accepts Healthy Volunteers:   No
Criteria

Inclusion Criteria:

  • Children aged 2-59 months with non-severe pneumonia based on WHO criteria of respiratory rate above the age specific cut-off, audible / ausculatory wheeze, accessible to follow up, whose guardians give written informed consent.

Exclusion Criteria:

  • Children with severe disease, received any documented antibiotic treatment in the past 48 hours, diagnosed asthmatic on maintenance therapy, complicating acute non-pulmonary or chronic illness, known drug allergy, hospitalization in the past 2 weeks, measles or history of measles within the last month, known immunodeficiency disorder, prior enrollment in the study, residing in areas not accessible for follow-up or whose guardian refuses to consent for the study. Radiological Pneumonia on X-Ray.
  Contacts and Locations
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Please refer to this study by its ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT00407394

Locations
India
King George's Medical University
Lucknow, UP, India, 226003
Sponsors and Collaborators
King George's Medical University
United States Agency for International Development (USAID)
Investigators
Principal Investigator: Shally Awasthi, MD King George's Medical University, Lucknow, India
  More Information

No publications provided by King George's Medical University

Additional publications automatically indexed to this study by ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier (NCT Number):
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT00407394     History of Changes
Other Study ID Numbers: 9998
Study First Received: December 2, 2006
Last Updated: December 2, 2006
Health Authority: India: Institutional Review Board

Keywords provided by King George's Medical University:
Pneumonia
Wheezing
Treatment
Children
India

Additional relevant MeSH terms:
Pneumonia
Lung Diseases
Respiratory Tract Diseases
Respiratory Tract Infections
Amoxicillin
Anti-Bacterial Agents
Anti-Infective Agents
Therapeutic Uses
Pharmacologic Actions

ClinicalTrials.gov processed this record on July 26, 2014