Development of Immune Globulin Treatment for Avian Flu

This study is ongoing, but not recruiting participants.
Sponsor:
Information provided by (Responsible Party):
National Institutes of Health Clinical Center (CC) ( National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID) )
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier:
NCT00383071
First received: September 29, 2006
Last updated: April 4, 2013
Last verified: April 2013
  Purpose

This study will determine how best to use a vaccine for generating high levels of antibodies called immune globulins (IVIG) in people, which, in turn, can be collected and used to develop a possible treatment for avian influenza (bird flu). Immune globulins are proteins made by the body that attack the influenza virus. This study will use an experimental bird flu vaccine to stimulate immune globulin production in healthy people. The vaccine is similar to the regular influenza vaccine and has been studied in more than 450 people. This study will use high doses of the vaccine to generate high antibody levels that can be collected for producing the new treatment.

Healthy adults between 18 and 60 years of age who weigh at least 110 pounds may be eligible for this study. Candidates are screened with a medical history and physical examination.

Participants are given one of three doses of the vaccine, depending on when they enter the study. The first 25 people enrolled receive a dose of 90 micrograms (mcg). If this dose is well tolerated, the next 25 people receive 120 mcg, and if this dose is also well tolerated, the last 25 people receive 180 mcg. Vaccination consists of either two shots (one in the muscle of each arm) or one shot in the buttock on four occasions. Subjects are vaccinated on four occasions, each 4 weeks apart. On the day of each vaccination, subjects provide a blood sample to evaluate blood counts, chemistries, and antibody levels, and to test for HIV, hepatitis B and C, syphilis, and antibody against avian flu. For 7 days after each vaccination, subjects keep a diary card to record any symptoms, such as pain, fever, muscle aches, or others. At the end of the 7 days, they are contacted by study staff to report the symptoms.

In addition to the vaccinations, subjects undergo apheresis to collect IVIG once their blood test shows moderately high antibody levels. For this procedure, blood is collected through a needle in an arm vein and flows through a catheter (plastic tube) into a machine that separates the blood cells from the antibodies and protein. The antibodies and protein are collected and the rest of the blood is returned to the body. Subjects are asked to undergo at least three apheresis procedures.

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Condition Intervention Phase
Infectious Diseases
Influenza
Avian Flu
Biological: H5N1 vaccine
Procedure: Apheresis
Phase 2

Study Type: Interventional
Study Design: Allocation: Non-Randomized
Endpoint Classification: Safety/Efficacy Study
Intervention Model: Parallel Assignment
Masking: Open Label
Official Title: A Phase II Vaccine Dose Finding Pilot Study for Development of an Anti-Influenza A (H5N1) Intravenous Hyper-Immune Globulin

Resource links provided by NLM:


Further study details as provided by National Institutes of Health Clinical Center (CC):

Primary Outcome Measures:
  • Safety of H5N1 Vaccine as Measured by Adverse Events [ Time Frame: Day 28, 56, 84 ] [ Designated as safety issue: Yes ]
    The number of subjects experiencing adverse events after receiving H5N1 vaccine


Enrollment: 126
Study Start Date: August 2006
Estimated Study Completion Date: May 2013
Primary Completion Date: March 2010 (Final data collection date for primary outcome measure)
Arms Assigned Interventions
Active Comparator: Cohort 1
H5N1 vaccine - 90 mcg IM every 4 week x 4 doses Apheresis - if HAI titer above 1:160
Biological: H5N1 vaccine
Monovalent subvirion H5N1 vaccine (rgA/Vietnam/1203/2004) 90 mcg/mL Manufactured by Sanofi Pasteur Inc, Swiftwater, PA.
Procedure: Apheresis
Once subjects achieved a high antibody titer (>1:160), they could begin apheresis to collect plasma.
Active Comparator: Cohort 2
H5N1 vaccine - 120 mcg IM every 4 week x 4 doses Apheresis - if HAI titer above 1:160
Biological: H5N1 vaccine
Monovalent subvirion H5N1 vaccine (rgA/Vietnam/1203/2004) 90 mcg/mL Manufactured by Sanofi Pasteur Inc, Swiftwater, PA.
Procedure: Apheresis
Once subjects achieved a high antibody titer (>1:160), they could begin apheresis to collect plasma.
Active Comparator: Cohort 3
H5N1 vaccine - 180 mcg IM every 4 week x 4 doses Apheresis - if HAI titer above 1:160
Biological: H5N1 vaccine
Monovalent subvirion H5N1 vaccine (rgA/Vietnam/1203/2004) 90 mcg/mL Manufactured by Sanofi Pasteur Inc, Swiftwater, PA.
Procedure: Apheresis
Once subjects achieved a high antibody titer (>1:160), they could begin apheresis to collect plasma.
Active Comparator: Cohort 4
H5N1 vaccine - 180 mcg IM every 4 weeks x 2 doses, injection site randomized to either deltoid or gluteus Apheresis - if HAI titer above 1:160
Biological: H5N1 vaccine
Monovalent subvirion H5N1 vaccine (rgA/Vietnam/1203/2004) 90 mcg/mL Manufactured by Sanofi Pasteur Inc, Swiftwater, PA.
Procedure: Apheresis
Once subjects achieved a high antibody titer (>1:160), they could begin apheresis to collect plasma.

Detailed Description:

Avian influenza presents a threat of a future pandemic. Over 200 people have been infected with the influenza A H5N1 virus, and the mortality is near 60 percent. Optimal therapy is not known, and failures of and resistance to currently available anti-virals have been reported.

The primary purpose of this Protocol is to determine the optimal vaccination schedule that creates a pool of hyper immunized individuals with high titer anti-influenza A (H5N1) antibodies. The Protocol will consist of a dose escalation study to determine the optimal vaccination dose and number of vaccinations. There are stopping rules based on the number and severity of adverse events that occur between the doses and between the cohorts. The optimal vaccination schedule that is determined could then be used in a larger population to develop a high titer anti-influenza A (H5N1) intravenous hyper-immune globulin (IVIG).

After all vaccinations have occured, and if an adequate antibody titer is reached in this study population, subjects will begin apheresis. Each subject will be asked to participate in 3 apheresis sessions, but may participate in up to 10 apheresis sessions.

  Eligibility

Ages Eligible for Study:   18 Years to 59 Years
Genders Eligible for Study:   Both
Accepts Healthy Volunteers:   Yes
Criteria

Inclusion Criteria

  1. Age ≥ 18 years old, and < 60 years old.
  2. Adequate clinical parameters (all of the following):

    • Afebrile (temperature < 38° C)
    • Systolic blood pressure >100 & <180 mmHg
    • Diastolic blood pressure >50 & <100 mmHg
    • Heart rate between 40-100 beats/minute
  3. Weight ≥ 110 pounds (50kg)
  4. Adequate peripheral venous access for plasmapheresis (as judged by the examiner)
  5. Females of child-bearing potential must (one of the following):

    • Be surgically sterile.
    • Be abstinent (or willing to be) 4 weeks prior to date of screening evaluation through the last apheresis session (estimate 6 months).
    • Use oral contraceptives, or other form of hormonal birth control including hormonal vaginal rings or transdermal patches, and have been using these for 3 months prior to date of screening evaluation through the last apheresis session (estimate 6 months).
    • Use an intra-uterine device (IUD) as birth control 4 weeks prior to date of screening evaluation through the last apheresis session (estimate 6 months).
    • Use (by ensuring her male partner(s) uses) barrier contraception (condom) with a spermicide as birth control 4 weeks prior to date of screening evaluation through the last apheresis session (estimate 6 months).

Exclusion Criteria:

  1. Has a medical history of

    • Thrombocytopenia or other blood dyscrasias
    • congestive heart failure
    • pulmonary hypertension
    • bleeding diathesis or therapeutic anticoagulation
    • HIV/AIDS
    • Hepatitis B
    • Hepatitis C
    • Known history of hepatitis after the 11th birthday.
    • Trypanosomiasis (Chagas' disease and sleeping sickness)
    • Leishmaniasis (Kala-azar)
    • Filariasis
    • Q fever
    • Yaws
    • Allergy to eggs, thimerosal, or other components of the vaccine
    • Severe reactions following immunization with contemporary influenza virus vaccines
    • Autoimmune disease or a history of Guillain-Barré
  2. History of cancer that meets any one of the following criteria:

    • Non-melanoma skin cancers within the last 1 year
    • Melanoma or any other cancer (excluding non-melanoma skin cancers) at any time
  3. Medication history that includes any of the following:

    • Current use of oral or parenteral steroids, high-dose inhaled steroids (>800 mcg/day of beclomethasone dipropionate or equivalent) or other immunosuppressive or cytotoxic drugs
    • Finasteride (Proscar, Propecia) within the last 1 month.
    • Isotretinoin (Accutane) within the last 1 month.
    • Acitretin (Soriatane) within the last 3 years.
    • Etretinate (Tegison) at any time.
    • Dutasteride (Avodart) within the last 6 months.
    • Growth hormone made from human pituitary glands at any time.
    • Beef insulin from the United Kingdom at any time.
  4. Has ever had any of the following:

    • Sexual contact with someone known to have HIV.
    • Had a relative with Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease, or been told that this disease is inherited within the family.
    • Received blood transfusion in the United Kingdom.
    • History of receiving money, drugs or other payment for sex.
    • History of receiving clotting factor concentrates.
    • History of a dura mater graft.
    • History of babesiosis.
    • For male donors, history of sexual contact with another male.
    • Used needles to take drugs, steroids, or other medications not prescribed by a physician.
    • Was born, lived in, had blood donation in or ever had sexual contact with anyone who lived in Cameroon, Central African Republic, Chad, Congo, Equatorial Guinea, Gabon, Niger, or Nigeria after 1977.
    • History of living 3 or more months total (need not be consecutive) in the UK from 1980-1996.
    • History of living 5 or more years total (need not be consecutive) in Europe since 1980.
    • History of living 6 or more months total (need not be consecutive) on a U.S. military base in Europe from 1980-1996 (specifically from 1980 through 1990 in Belgium, the Netherlands, or Germany, and from 1980 through 1996 in Spain, Portugal, Turkey, Italy or Greece).
  5. Within the last 3 weeks received the seasonal (conventional trivalent) flu vaccine
  6. Within the last 8 weeks:

    • Was vaccinated with the small pox vaccine, or was in close contact with someone who was vaccinated (i.e., close family member).

  7. Within the last 3 months has:

    • Current or previous participation in any other apheresis procedures/protocols (not related to this protocol).

  8. Within the last 4 months has had:

    • A blood donation of a double unit of red cells.

  9. Within the last 12 months has:

    • Received any blood or blood component.
    • Donated blood at a paid donation center (donations at a hospital blood bank do not apply).
    • History of unsafe (multiple-use equipment) tattoo, acupuncture, or piercing practices.
    • Received an organ transplant.
    • Received a bone or skin graft.
    • Lived with someone who has any type of hepatitis.
    • Traveled to areas with malaria.
    • Been incarcerated for more than 72 hours.
    • Oral or inhalation use of illegal drugs (i.e. those not prescribed by a physician).
    • Had or has been treated (with or without confirmatory diagnosis) for syphilis or gonorrhea
  10. Within the last 12 months has had sexual contact with (any of the following):

    • An individual having viral hepatitis.
    • A prostitute or anyone else who takes money or drugs or other payment for sex.
    • Anyone who has ever used needles to take drugs, steroids, or anything else not prescribed by their doctor.
    • Anyone who has hemophilia or has used clotting factor concentrates.
    • For females, a male who has ever had sexual contact with another male.
  11. Participation in medical research that includes:

    • Protocols that are currently ongoing or will start during the duration of this study that require more than 100cc of blood to be given in any 6-week period of time.
    • Administration of any unlicensed drug within the last 3 months or during the duration of this study.
    • Administration of any unlicensed vaccine within the last 12 months or during the duration of this study.
  12. Currently pregnant (if known).
  13. Any condition that, in the opinion of the investigator, would render vaccination unsafe, would interfere with the antibody response or the evaluation of these responses, or would place the subject at increased risk of injury from apheresis.
  Contacts and Locations
Please refer to this study by its ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT00383071

Locations
United States, Maryland
National Institutes of Health Clinical Center, 9000 Rockville Pike
Bethesda, Maryland, United States, 20892
Sponsors and Collaborators
Investigators
Principal Investigator: H. Clifford Lane, M.D. NIH/NIAID
  More Information

Additional Information:
Publications:
Additional publications automatically indexed to this study by ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier (NCT Number):
Responsible Party: National Institutes of Health Clinical Center (CC) ( National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID) )
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT00383071     History of Changes
Other Study ID Numbers: 06-I-0235, 06-I-0235
Study First Received: September 29, 2006
Results First Received: April 26, 2012
Last Updated: April 4, 2013
Health Authority: United States: Federal Government
United States: Food and Drug Administration

Keywords provided by National Institutes of Health Clinical Center (CC):
Apheresis
Avian Flu
Healthy Volunteers
Infectious Diseases
IVIG
Healthy Volunteer
HV

Additional relevant MeSH terms:
Communicable Diseases
Infection
Influenza in Birds
Influenza, Human
Orthomyxoviridae Infections
RNA Virus Infections
Virus Diseases
Respiratory Tract Infections
Respiratory Tract Diseases
Antibodies
Immunoglobulins
Immunologic Factors
Physiological Effects of Drugs
Pharmacologic Actions

ClinicalTrials.gov processed this record on April 16, 2014