Diffusion Tensor Imaging in Autism

This study has been withdrawn prior to enrollment.
(Study was completed but there were no participants. It was completed as a theoretical study. Requests for final progress report can be sent to Dr. Liu.)
Sponsor:
Information provided by (Responsible Party):
University of Florida
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier:
NCT00382382
First received: September 28, 2006
Last updated: December 15, 2011
Last verified: December 2011
  Purpose

Using a new and more detailed approach to diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) recently developed in our lab, the investigators hope to learn more about irregularities in the brain that are related to autism. The investigators are especially interested in brain regions that contribute to repetitive behaviors in children with autism. Repetitive behaviors include stereotyped motor movements (hand-flapping), self-injurious behaviors (head hitting), compulsions (lining up toys), insistence on things staying the same, and difficulty with change. These behaviors often interfere with learning, can disrupt daily functioning, and can lead to other behavioral problems. Two specific aims will be accomplished:

Aim 1: To examine the integrity of white matter pathways in high functioning autistic children. The investigators hypothesize that autism is associated with specific white matter abnormalities in the cerebellum and other motor circuits. Additionally, the investigators expect to confirm and expand on previous reports of cerebral abnormalities by using newly developed DTI methods.

Aim 2: To determine whether there is a relationship between white matter abnormalities and the occurrence of restricted repetitive behaviors in children with autism. The investigators hypothesize that differences in the occurrence and type of restricted repetitive behaviors between autistic individuals are correlated with specific regional white matter abnormalities.

Results from the proposed experiments should contribute to current knowledge of brain abnormalities in autism and their relationship to restricted repetitive behaviors, and may be relevant to understanding the mechanisms underlying motor deficits in this disorder.


Condition Intervention
Autistic Disorder
Other: no intervention

Study Type: Interventional
Study Design: Allocation: Non-Randomized
Endpoint Classification: Pharmacokinetics/Dynamics Study
Intervention Model: Single Group Assignment
Masking: Open Label
Primary Purpose: Health Services Research
Official Title: Diffusion Tensor Imaging in Autism

Resource links provided by NLM:


Further study details as provided by University of Florida:

Primary Outcome Measures:
  • RBS-R scores, including both total and subset scores [ Time Frame: once ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]

Enrollment: 0
Study Start Date: July 2008
Study Completion Date: July 2009
Primary Completion Date: July 2009 (Final data collection date for primary outcome measure)
Arms Assigned Interventions
No Intervention: 1
Children with Autism
Other: no intervention
not a treatment study
No Intervention: 2
Healthy Volunteers
Other: no intervention
not a treatment study

Detailed Description:

Using a new and more detailed approach to diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) recently developed in our lab, we aim to confirm and expand upon previous findings of white matter abnormalities throughout the brain in individuals with autism. We have chosen to focus particularly on cerebellar and motor pathways in consideration of the prevalence of motor deficits in autism as well as brain structural studies that have indicated cerebellar abnormalities in autistic children. Finally, we propose to investigate a possible functional association between white matter structure and the expression of restricted repetitive behaviors in autistic children, by correlating measures of white matter integrity with behavioral assessments indicating the severity of various forms of restricted repetitive behaviors. Two specific aims will be accomplished. Aim 1: To examine the integrity of white matter pathways in high functioning autistic children. We hypothesize that autism is associated with specific white matter abnormalities in the cerebellum and other motor circuits. Additionally, we expect to confirm and expand on previous reports of cerebral abnormalities by using newly developed DTI methods. Aim 2: To determine whether there is a relationship between white matter abnormalities and the occurrence of restricted repetitive behaviors in children with autism. We hypothesize that differences in the occurrence and type of restricted repetitive behaviors between autistic individuals are correlated with specific regional white matter abnormalities. Results from the proposed experiments should contribute to current knowledge of brain abnormalities in autism and their relationship to restricted repetitive behaviors, and may be relevant to understanding the mechanisms underlying motor deficits in this disorder.

  Eligibility

Ages Eligible for Study:   8 Years to 12 Years
Genders Eligible for Study:   Male
Accepts Healthy Volunteers:   Yes
Criteria

Inclusion Criteria:

  • male, aged 8-12 years of age
  • clinical diagnoses of autism from a licensed professional for Autism or Asperger's Syndrome
  • IQ >80
  • no speech delay
  • no major sensory or motor deficits

Exclusion Criteria:

  • known genetic or medical conditions (e.g. Fragile X syndrome, tuberous sclerosis, Turner's syndrome)
  • currently (within prior 3 months) taking anti-psychotic/dopamine-modulating medications
  Contacts and Locations
Choosing to participate in a study is an important personal decision. Talk with your doctor and family members or friends about deciding to join a study. To learn more about this study, you or your doctor may contact the study research staff using the Contacts provided below. For general information, see Learn About Clinical Studies.

Please refer to this study by its ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT00382382

Locations
United States, Florida
McKnight Brain Institute of the University of Florida
Gainesville, Florida, United States, 32611
Sponsors and Collaborators
University of Florida
Investigators
Study Director: Mark H. Lewis, PhD University of Florida
  More Information

No publications provided

Responsible Party: University of Florida
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT00382382     History of Changes
Other Study ID Numbers: 1R03HD051656
Study First Received: September 28, 2006
Last Updated: December 15, 2011
Health Authority: United States: Institutional Review Board

Keywords provided by University of Florida:
Autism
Asperger Syndrome
Restricted repetitive behavior
Stereotyped patterns of behavior
Typically Developing children
Human Volunteers

Additional relevant MeSH terms:
Autistic Disorder
Child Development Disorders, Pervasive
Mental Disorders Diagnosed in Childhood
Mental Disorders

ClinicalTrials.gov processed this record on July 26, 2014