Trial record 14 of 24 for:    niaid malaria | Open Studies

Malaria Prevalence in Children

The recruitment status of this study is unknown because the information has not been verified recently.
Verified February 2008 by National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID).
Recruitment status was  Recruiting
Sponsor:
Information provided by:
National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID)
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier:
NCT00322816
First received: May 4, 2006
Last updated: August 26, 2010
Last verified: February 2008
  Purpose

The purpose of this pilot study is to evaluate the use of (1) 'malaria prevalence', (2) 'malaria incidence' and (3) 'malaria mortality' as a measure of malaria transmission in The Gambia, while mosquito insecticides (larvicides) are used to control malaria-carrying mosquitoes. Two thousand children aged 6 months to 10 years of age will be recruited from villages in the study area. They will be monitored over 7 months for the presence of malaria parasites and signs and symptoms of the disease.


Condition
Plasmodium Falciparum Malaria

Study Type: Observational
Study Design: Time Perspective: Prospective
Official Title: Malaria Prevalence, Incidence and Mortality in Children

Resource links provided by NLM:


Further study details as provided by National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID):

Estimated Enrollment: 2000
Study Start Date: June 2006
Estimated Study Completion Date: January 2007
Detailed Description:

Malaria remains one of the world's greatest childhood killers and is a substantial obstacle to social and economic development in the tropics. The overwhelming bulk of the world's malaria burden rests upon the population of sub-Saharan Africa because of the unique coincidence of expanding human populations, weak health systems, the world's most effective vector mosquito species and environmental conditions ideal for transmission. At the start of the new millennium malaria is still deeply entrenched in Africa and effective malaria control is under threat from the inexorable spread of parasite strains resistant to antimalarial drugs and the emergence of mosquitoes resistant to the pyrethroid insecticides used to impregnate bednets. Larval control may offer a new alternative for effective control. We plan to apply a larvicide in an effort to control malaria and reduce the burden of malaria. While it is abundantly clear that this product will kill mosquito larvae in the laboratory and in the field, it is not certain that doing so will reduce the burden of malaria for the human population. There are several steps which intervene between the survival of mosquito larvae in aquatic breeding sites and the human end points that we hope to achieve. Briefly, the steps involved include survival and development of immature mosquito stages, emergence of adult mosquitoes, blood feeding by those mosquitoes, acquisition and development of malaria parasites by adult mosquitoes and transmission of parasites to susceptible humans. Once infected, the human population may either clear the infection over time or go on to develop symptoms. Among those who develop symptoms, some receive prompt and successful treatment, while some others go on to either develop chronic symptoms or to progress through severe malaria to death. Primary outcomes are: 1) the proportion of subjects with malaria parasites (Plasmodium Falciparum), 2) the incidence of clinical malaria, and 3) the age-standardized overall and malaria-specific mortality. Secondary outcomes are: 1) prevalence of a clinical episode of malaria (presence of malaria parasites plus an axillary temperature of 37.5 C or greater during examination or a history of fever during the last 48 hours); 2) prevalence of high parasitemias (defined as equal to of greater than 5000 parasites per mcl); 3) prevalence of enlarged spleen (defined using Hackett's classification); and 4) prevalence of severe anemia (defined as hemoglobin less than or equal to 5 g/dl). Within a broad area of eastern Gambia, zones have been identified for application of larvicide, with matched control zones where no larval control have been applied. In each area, the human population will be monitored to determine whether one of four specific malariometric end points will provide a valid assessment of larvicidal effectiveness. In this study 2000 children, 6 months to 10 years of age, will be recruited. These pilot studies will inform subsequent (not included in this NIH project) large scale evaluations of larviciding for malaria control. This protocol is designed to determine whether prevalence and incidence of malaria attacks and deaths can be used to evaluate the impact of Bti for malaria transmission control.

  Eligibility

Ages Eligible for Study:   6 Months to 10 Years
Genders Eligible for Study:   Both
Accepts Healthy Volunteers:   Yes
Criteria

Inclusion Criteria:

All children living in the defined areas for intervention and between the age of 6 months and 10 years will be invited to participate. No distinctions will be made regarding gender or ethnic group. Moreover, as the target population is all people living in the areas of intervention, and in order of the results from this study to be as generalizable as possible, no distinctions will be made in terms of medical condition or physical health. Moreover, we believe that any children with a medical condition would be especially favored by the participation in the study.

Exclusion Criteria:

None

  Contacts and Locations
Choosing to participate in a study is an important personal decision. Talk with your doctor and family members or friends about deciding to join a study. To learn more about this study, you or your doctor may contact the study research staff using the Contacts provided below. For general information, see Learn About Clinical Studies.

Please refer to this study by its ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT00322816

Contacts
Contact: Steven W Lindsay +00 44 191 331 349

Locations
Gambia
Medical Research Council's Laboratories Recruiting
Fajara, Gambia
Sponsors and Collaborators
  More Information

No publications provided

ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT00322816     History of Changes
Other Study ID Numbers: 05-0068
Study First Received: May 4, 2006
Last Updated: August 26, 2010
Health Authority: Unspecified

Keywords provided by National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID):
Malaria, Plasmodium falciparum, Gambia, larvicides

Additional relevant MeSH terms:
Malaria
Malaria, Falciparum
Protozoan Infections
Parasitic Diseases

ClinicalTrials.gov processed this record on September 11, 2014