Dietary Variety Versus Dietary Fat Effects in Energy Intake

This study has been completed.
Sponsor:
Information provided by:
National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK)
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier:
NCT00285571
First received: January 31, 2006
Last updated: March 17, 2010
Last verified: March 2010
  Purpose

The relative importance of dietary patterns vs. macronutrient composition in affecting energy intake and body weight remains uncertain. In this study we propose to investigate the relative effects of dietary variety vs dietary fat on voluntary energy intake in adults. We will quantify and compare the effects of typical ranges of variety & fat intakes in the American diet on voluntary energy intake. The primary hypotheses to be tested are 1)an increasing availability of entree/side/snack/dessert variety offered will significantly increase voluntary energy intake in a dose-response fashion when other dietary factors known to influence energy intake are held constant. 2)The separate effects of dietary variety & dietary fat on energy intake will be similar.

We anticipate that the results of this investigation will lead to a greater understanding of the relative importance of eating patterns versus macronutrient composition in the etiology of obesity, and more specifically, dietary variety versus dietary fat in determining energy intake. More importantly, it will help lay a foundation for improved dietary recommendations concerning weight loss and prevention of excess weight gain in adulthood.


Condition Intervention Phase
Healthy
Behavioral: Controlled Feeding Intervention
Phase 1
Phase 2

Study Type: Interventional
Study Design: Allocation: Randomized
Endpoint Classification: Efficacy Study
Intervention Model: Crossover Assignment
Masking: Single Blind
Primary Purpose: Prevention
Official Title: Dietary Variety vs Dietary Fat Effects on Energy Intake

Resource links provided by NLM:


Further study details as provided by National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK):

Primary Outcome Measures:
  • Change in energy intake at two weeks.

Secondary Outcome Measures:
  • Two week changes in body weight, fat, taste preferences, nutrient composition of self-selected dietary intake, eating patterns of self-selected dietary intake.

Estimated Enrollment: 64
Study Start Date: September 2005
Study Completion Date: September 2007
Detailed Description:

The relative importance of dietary patterns vs. macronutrient composition in affecting energy intake and body weight remains uncertain. In this study we propose to investigate the relative effects of dietary variety vs dietary fat on voluntary energy intake in adults. We will quantify and compare the effects of typical ranges of variety & fat intakes in the American diet on voluntary energy intake. The primary hypotheses to be tested are 1)an increasing availability of entree/side/snack/dessert variety offered will significantly increase voluntary energy intake in a dose-response fashion when other dietary factors known to influence energy intake are held constant. 2)The separate effects of dietary variety & dietary fat on energy intake will be similar.

We anticipate that the results of this investigation will lead to a greater understanding of the relative importance of eating patterns versus macronutrient composition in the etiology of obesity, and more specifically, dietary variety versus dietary fat in determining energy intake. More importantly, it will help lay a foundation for improved dietary recommendations concerning weight loss and prevention of excess weight gain in adulthood

  Eligibility

Ages Eligible for Study:   18 Years to 50 Years
Genders Eligible for Study:   Both
Accepts Healthy Volunteers:   Yes
Criteria

Inclusion Criteria: Healthy adults age 18-5 y with BMI 20-35 kg/m

  Contacts and Locations
Choosing to participate in a study is an important personal decision. Talk with your doctor and family members or friends about deciding to join a study. To learn more about this study, you or your doctor may contact the study research staff using the Contacts provided below. For general information, see Learn About Clinical Studies.

Please refer to this study by its ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT00285571

Locations
United States, Washington
Bastyr University
Kenmore, Washington, United States, 98036
Sponsors and Collaborators
Investigators
Principal Investigator: Megan McCrory, PhD Bastyr University
  More Information

No publications provided

ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT00285571     History of Changes
Other Study ID Numbers: DK62400 (completed 2007)
Study First Received: January 31, 2006
Last Updated: March 17, 2010
Health Authority: United States: Federal Government

ClinicalTrials.gov processed this record on August 21, 2014