D-Cycloserine Augmentation of Exposure and Response Prevention Treatment for Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder

This study has been withdrawn prior to enrollment.
(PI left the university)
Sponsor:
Collaborator:
Obsessive Compulsive Foundation
Information provided by (Responsible Party):
University of Florida
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier:
NCT00257361
First received: November 18, 2005
Last updated: September 27, 2013
Last verified: August 2011
  Purpose

We propose to undertake an initial study of DCS to determine whether it has any short-term clinical benefits when added to standard ERP therapy in adults with OCD.


Condition Intervention Phase
Obsessive Compulsive Disorder
Drug: D-Cycloserine
Phase 2

Study Type: Interventional
Study Design: Allocation: Randomized
Intervention Model: Single Group Assignment
Masking: Open Label
Official Title: D-Cycloserine Augmentation of Exposure and Response Prevention Treatment for Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder

Resource links provided by NLM:


Further study details as provided by University of Florida:

Primary Outcome Measures:
  • YBOCS

Secondary Outcome Measures:
  • Response rate

Enrollment: 0
Study Start Date: July 2005
Detailed Description:

Exposure and response prevention (ERP) has proven efficacy for OCD treatment in adults. Yet, ERP does not help all individuals, and those who benefit often remain somewhat symptomatic. Behavioral models for OCD treatment are based on two components. First, fears are acquired by the development of an association between a neutral stimulus and an aversive stimulus such the former acquires the aversive properties of the latter. The neutral stimulus is then designated as a conditioned stimulus (CS), and the original aversive stimulus is called an unconditioned stimulus (UCS). Second, the acquired fears can be unlearned through presentation of the CS in the absence of the UCS, a process known as extinction. On a neural level, ERP incorporates similar mechanisms to those involved in fear conditioning. Antagonists at the glutamatergic NMDA receptor, which is involved in learning and memory, block both fear learning and extinction. D-Cycloserine (DCS), a partial agonist at the N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) glutamate receptor subtype, augments learning in animals and humans. Clinical application in animals and humans suggest that DCS facilitates the fear extinction process when taken prior to exposure to feared stimuli. An initial trial in acrophobic adults provided support for acute DCS dosing as facilitating extinction to fear. Given that ERP is based on extinction, it follows that DCS may augment ERP therapy providing enhanced treatment effects. With this in mind, we propose to undertake an initial study of DCS to determine whether it has any short-term clinical benefits when added to standard ERP therapy in adults with OCD.

  Eligibility

Ages Eligible for Study:   18 Years to 65 Years
Genders Eligible for Study:   Both
Criteria

Inclusion Criteria:

  1. a principal diagnosis of OCD assigned at pre-treatment, derived from the ADIS-IV, with a clinical severity rating of 4 or above;
  2. 18-65 years of age; and,
  3. an IQ of ³ 80.

Exclusion Criteria:

  1. positive diagnosis of schizophrenia, other psychotic disorder, pervasive developmental disorder, organic brain syndrome, or mental retardation;
  2. do not speak English;
  3. are unwilling to attend twice weekly sessions; or,
  4. is pregnant, breast feeding a child, or attempting to become pregnant (see below rationale)
  Contacts and Locations
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Please refer to this study by its ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT00257361

Sponsors and Collaborators
University of Florida
Obsessive Compulsive Foundation
Investigators
Principal Investigator: Eric Storch, Ph.D. University of Florida
  More Information

No publications provided

Responsible Party: University of Florida
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT00257361     History of Changes
Other Study ID Numbers: IRB Protocol #639-2004, 00053428
Study First Received: November 18, 2005
Last Updated: September 27, 2013
Health Authority: United States: Food and Drug Administration

Additional relevant MeSH terms:
Compulsive Personality Disorder
Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder
Disease
Personality Disorders
Mental Disorders
Anxiety Disorders
Pathologic Processes
Cycloserine
Anti-Infective Agents, Urinary
Anti-Infective Agents
Therapeutic Uses
Pharmacologic Actions
Renal Agents
Antibiotics, Antitubercular
Anti-Bacterial Agents
Antitubercular Agents
Antimetabolites
Molecular Mechanisms of Pharmacological Action

ClinicalTrials.gov processed this record on September 16, 2014