Promoting Long-term Behavior Change to Reduce CVD Risk

This study has been completed.
Sponsor:
Collaborators:
Unrestricted research gift from Nutrilite Health Institute
Information provided by:
Stanford University
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier:
NCT00227006
First received: September 13, 2005
Last updated: January 19, 2011
Last verified: January 2011
  Purpose

Once intervention class or staff contact is removed, obese adults participating in behavioral weight-loss programs often give up healthy eating habits and regain weight. We examined whether taste-based goal setting, which minimizes perceived deprivation by promoting taste and moderation, would sustain long-term reductions in saturated fat and body mass index (BMI).


Condition Intervention
Obesity
Behavioral: Behavioral lifestyle/weight-loss intervention

Study Type: Interventional
Study Design: Allocation: Randomized
Endpoint Classification: Efficacy Study
Intervention Model: Factorial Assignment
Masking: Single Blind (Outcomes Assessor)
Primary Purpose: Treatment
Official Title: Promoting Long-term Dietary Change to Reduce CVD Risk

Resource links provided by NLM:


Further study details as provided by Stanford University:

Primary Outcome Measures:
  • Percentage of saturated fat in diet [ Time Frame: 18 months ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]

Secondary Outcome Measures:
  • Body weight [ Time Frame: 18 months ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]

Enrollment: 163
Study Start Date: January 1999
Study Completion Date: April 2004
Primary Completion Date: April 2004 (Final data collection date for primary outcome measure)
Arms Assigned Interventions
Experimental: Taste-Based Goal Setting
6-month intervention (14 lifestyle counseling classes)
Behavioral: Behavioral lifestyle/weight-loss intervention
Active Comparator: Smart Consumers
6-month intervention (14 lifestyle counseling classes)
Behavioral: Behavioral lifestyle/weight-loss intervention
No Intervention: Community Access
Assessment-only control group
Behavioral: Behavioral lifestyle/weight-loss intervention

Detailed Description:

Once intervention class or staff contact is removed, obese adults participating in behavioral weight-loss programs often give up healthy eating habits and regain weight. We examined whether taste-based goal setting, which minimizes perceived deprivation by promoting taste and moderation, would sustain long-term reductions in saturated fat and body mass index (BMI). Participants were randomized to Taste-Based Choices (taste-based goal setting + a standard 6-month behavioral weight-loss intervention), Smart Consumers (a standard 6-month intervention alone) or Community Access (access to commercial/community-based behavioral weight-loss programs) and followed over 18 months. To test our hypotheses, we examined a set of orthogonal contrasts (TBC and SC vs. CA; TBC vs. SC) on reductions in saturated fat (Block FFQ) and clinic-measured BMI.

  Eligibility

Ages Eligible for Study:   25 Years and older
Genders Eligible for Study:   Both
Accepts Healthy Volunteers:   Yes
Criteria

Inclusion Criteria:- Body mass index between 27-37

  • Physically inactive
  • Able to participate in physical activity
  • Percentage of daily calories from total fat 30% or more
  • Free of diagnosed heart disease
  • Stable on medications for 3 months or more Exclusion Criteria:- Diabetic
  • Dysphoric (Beck Depression Inventory score greater than 18)
  • Binge eating or bulimic (Eating Disorder Diagnostic Scale)
  Contacts and Locations
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Please refer to this study by its ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT00227006

Locations
United States, California
Stanford University School of Medicine
Stanford, California, United States, 94305
Sponsors and Collaborators
Stanford University
Unrestricted research gift from Nutrilite Health Institute
Investigators
Principal Investigator: Michaela Kiernan Stanford University
  More Information

Publications:
Responsible Party: Michaela Kiernan, Stanford Prevention Research Center
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT00227006     History of Changes
Other Study ID Numbers: R29-HL60154, R29HL060154
Study First Received: September 13, 2005
Last Updated: January 19, 2011
Health Authority: United States: Federal Government

ClinicalTrials.gov processed this record on September 30, 2014