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Exposure and Response Prevention With Behavioral- Versus Cognitive Therapy Rationale in Obsessive Compulsive Disorder

This study has been completed.
Sponsor:
Collaborator:
Norwegian Foundation for Health and Rehabilitation
Information provided by (Responsible Party):
Norwegian University of Science and Technology
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier:
NCT00184262
First received: September 13, 2005
Last updated: March 20, 2012
Last verified: March 2012
  Purpose

The aim of the study is to determine whether exposure and response prevention (ERP) is more effective when patients are presented with a behavioral therapy versus cognitive therapy rationale in the treatment of obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD).


Condition Intervention
Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder
Behavioral: ERP cognitive therapy
Behavioral: ERP behavioral therapy

Study Type: Interventional
Study Design: Allocation: Randomized
Endpoint Classification: Efficacy Study
Intervention Model: Parallel Assignment
Masking: Single Blind (Outcomes Assessor)
Primary Purpose: Prevention
Official Title: Exposure and Response Prevention (ERP) With Behavioral- Versus Cognitive Therapy Rationale in the Treatment of OCD

Resource links provided by NLM:


Further study details as provided by Norwegian University of Science and Technology:

Primary Outcome Measures:
  • scores on Y-BOCS and SCID-I [ Time Frame: 3 months ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]

Enrollment: 35
Study Start Date: January 2003
Study Completion Date: December 2006
Arms Assigned Interventions
Active Comparator: ERP cognitive therapy Behavioral: ERP cognitive therapy
15 exposure and response prevention (ERP) sessions in 3 months with a cognitive therapy rationale
Other Name: exposure and response prevention + cognitive therapy
Experimental: ERP behavioral therapy Behavioral: ERP behavioral therapy
15 exposure and response prevention (ERP) sessions in 3 months with a behavioral therapy rationale
Other Name: exposure and response prevention + behavioral therapy

Detailed Description:

The aim of the study is to determine whether exposure and response prevention (ERP) is more effective when patients are presented with a behavioral therapy versus cognitive therapy rationale in the treatment of obsessive-compulsive disorder OCD.

A randomized controlled trial including patients with OCD. 50 patients will receive 15 ERP sessions in 3 months.

  Eligibility

Ages Eligible for Study:   18 Years and older
Genders Eligible for Study:   Both
Accepts Healthy Volunteers:   Yes
Criteria

Inclusion Criteria:

  • Obsessive-compulsive disorder

Exclusion Criteria:

  • active thought disorder, uncontrolled bipolar disorder, mental retardation, organic mental disorder, initiation or change in medication three months prior to inclusion in the study
  Contacts and Locations
Choosing to participate in a study is an important personal decision. Talk with your doctor and family members or friends about deciding to join a study. To learn more about this study, you or your doctor may contact the study research staff using the Contacts provided below. For general information, see Learn About Clinical Studies.

Please refer to this study by its ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT00184262

Locations
Norway
Norwegian University of Science and Technology, INM
Trondheim, Norway, 7441
Sponsors and Collaborators
Norwegian University of Science and Technology
Norwegian Foundation for Health and Rehabilitation
Investigators
Principal Investigator: K. Gunnar Götestam, PhD MD Norwegian University of Science and Technology
  More Information

Publications:
Responsible Party: Norwegian University of Science and Technology
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT00184262     History of Changes
Other Study ID Numbers: 4941.1
Study First Received: September 13, 2005
Last Updated: March 20, 2012
Health Authority: Norway: Norwegian Social Science Data Services

Additional relevant MeSH terms:
Compulsive Personality Disorder
Disease
Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder
Anxiety Disorders
Mental Disorders
Pathologic Processes
Personality Disorders

ClinicalTrials.gov processed this record on November 20, 2014