Rheumatic Diseases and Computer Use

This study has been completed.
Sponsor:
Information provided by:
University of Pittsburgh
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier:
NCT00177320
First received: September 12, 2005
Last updated: February 7, 2008
Last verified: February 2008
  Purpose

Computers allow individuals to engage in economic, social, and entertainment activities. Despite the many benefits of computer use, many individuals with rheumatic diseases may have difficulty using a computer. However, currently there is almost no information on the problems individuals with rheumatic diseases experience using a computer. Baseline information on the types of problems experienced by individuals with rheumatic diseases as well as the magnitude of those problems is needed before methods can be developed to intervene and remediate them. In this study we will develop and administer to a representative sample of patients with rheumatic diseases a survey which will examine the type and magnitude of computer problems experienced by those with rheumatic diseases. The goal of this study is to complete a needs assessment on the problems experienced by those with rheumatic diseases during computer use. This assessment will lay the groundwork for the development of outcome measures and interventions to improve computer use for individuals with rheumatic diseases. In the future it will assist individuals with rheumatic diseases to be able to use computers more comfortably and efficiently.


Condition
Rheumatoid Arthritis
Fibromyalgia
Osteoarthritis

Study Type: Observational
Study Design: Time Perspective: Prospective
Official Title: Rheumatic Diseases and Computer Use: A Needs Assessment

Resource links provided by NLM:


Further study details as provided by University of Pittsburgh:

Estimated Enrollment: 1200
Study Start Date: March 2005
Study Completion Date: May 2005
Estimated Primary Completion Date: May 2005 (Final data collection date for primary outcome measure)
Detailed Description:

Computers allow individuals to engage in economic, social, and entertainment activities. They are vital for full participation in many areas of society, and have become a necessity for many types of employment, particularly management and administrative positions. Despite the many benefits of computer use, many individuals with rheumatic diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis (RA), osteoarthritis (OA), and fibromyalgia (FM) may be unable to use a computer due to limitations in hand function or sitting ability. These limitations can prevent the physical manipulation of computer peripherals or inhibit the ability to sit for extended periods of time at a computer. Despite the importance of computer use there is almost no information on the problems individuals with rheumatic diseases experience using a computer. Baseline information on the types of problems experienced by individuals with rheumatic diseases as well as the magnitude of those problems is needed before methods can be developed to intervene and remediate them. The aim of this study is to complete a needs assessment on the problems experienced by those with rheumatic diseases during computer use. This assessment will lay the groundwork for the development of outcome measures and interventions to improve computer use for individuals with rheumatic diseases by identifying problem areas and examine the magnitude of those problems. This study will be implemented in two phases. In Phase I (months 01-05) we will use several focus group sessions of 5-10 participants to acquire consumer input to develop and refine a survey to examine the problems experienced during computer use by people with rheumatic diseases. In Phase II the survey developed in Phase I {Computer Problem Survey (ComPS)] will be administered to a representative sample of patients with rheumatic diseases (n = ~1500) to ascertain the type and magnitude of computer problems (months 06-12). These 2 phases will be used to answer the following questions: 1. What aspects of computer use are reported to be a problem for individuals with RA, OA, and FM? 2. What is the magnitude of these problems for individuals with RA, OA, and FM? 3. How does the magnitude differ when examined by age, gender, education, race/ethnicity, and work status? At the end of the study we will have gathered the descriptive data necessary to 1) begin modifying current computer performance evaluations to focus on measuring computer use performance in individuals with rheumatic diseases; and 2) develop and test interventions, such as adaptive equipment and ergonomics, to promote continued computer use for individuals with difficulties using a computer due to physical limitations.

  Eligibility

Ages Eligible for Study:   18 Years to 65 Years
Genders Eligible for Study:   Both
Accepts Healthy Volunteers:   No
Criteria

Inclusion Criteria:

  • Has Fibromyalgia, Osteoarthritis, or Rheumatoid arthritis; between 18-65; in the UPMC Arthritis Network Disease REgistry

Exclusion Criteria:

-

  Contacts and Locations
Choosing to participate in a study is an important personal decision. Talk with your doctor and family members or friends about deciding to join a study. To learn more about this study, you or your doctor may contact the study research staff using the Contacts provided below. For general information, see Learn About Clinical Studies.

Please refer to this study by its ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT00177320

Locations
United States, Pennsylvania
University of Pittsburgh
Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, United States, 15260
Sponsors and Collaborators
University of Pittsburgh
Investigators
Principal Investigator: Nancy A. Baker, ScD University of Pittsburgh
  More Information

No publications provided

Responsible Party: Nancy A. Baker, Assistant Professor, University of Pittsburgh
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT00177320     History of Changes
Other Study ID Numbers: 0502148
Study First Received: September 12, 2005
Last Updated: February 7, 2008
Health Authority: United States: Institutional Review Board

Keywords provided by University of Pittsburgh:
Rheumatic Disorders
Computer Use

Additional relevant MeSH terms:
Arthritis, Rheumatoid
Fibromyalgia
Myofascial Pain Syndromes
Osteoarthritis
Rheumatic Diseases
Arthritis
Autoimmune Diseases
Connective Tissue Diseases
Immune System Diseases
Joint Diseases
Muscular Diseases
Musculoskeletal Diseases
Nervous System Diseases
Neuromuscular Diseases

ClinicalTrials.gov processed this record on October 23, 2014