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Effects of Tai Chi Exercise on Innate and Adaptive Immune Function

The recruitment status of this study is unknown because the information has not been verified recently.
Verified December 2004 by National Taiwan University Hospital.
Recruitment status was  Recruiting
Sponsor:
Collaborator:
National Science Council, Taiwan
Information provided by:
National Taiwan University Hospital
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier:
NCT00172679
First received: September 12, 2005
Last updated: September 26, 2007
Last verified: December 2004
  Purpose

Tai Chi is a traditional Chinese martial art that has been practiced for many centuries. Improvements in cardiorespiratory function, balance, muscular strength, flexibility in older subjects; preventing falls in the frail elderly; stress reduction, and mood state with Tai Chi practices have been well established. A potential immune response effect of Tai Chi practice is a frequent claim; however, this is an under-researched area. Therefore, in this study, the researchers will examine the effects of Tai Chi on innate and adaptive immune function.


Condition
Healthy

Study Type: Observational
Study Design: Observational Model: Defined Population
Time Perspective: Cross-Sectional

Resource links provided by NLM:


Further study details as provided by National Taiwan University Hospital:

Estimated Enrollment: 30
Study Start Date: July 2005
Estimated Study Completion Date: June 2006
Detailed Description:

Tai Chi, a traditional Chinese martial art that has been practiced for many centuries, has only recently gained the interest of researchers in Western countries as an alternative form of exercise. Tai Chi combines deep diaphragmatic breathing and relaxation with many fundamental postures that flow imperceptibly and smoothly from one to the other through slow, gentle, and graceful movements. Based on the maximum oxygen consumption (VO2max) measured during the practice, Tai Chi is characterized as a low- to moderate-intensity form of exercise. Tai Chi has been applied as a rehabilitation program in patients with heart failure, hypertension, acute myocardial infarction, arthritis, and multiple sclerosis. Improvements in cardiorespiratory function, balance, muscular strength, flexibility in older subjects; preventing falls in the frail elderly; stress reduction, and mood state with Tai Chi practices have been well established. A potential immune response effect of Tai Chi practice is a frequent claim; however, this is an under-researched area. A nonrandomized controlled study of 60 elderly subjects found that the total number of circulating T cells were significantly higher in the Tai Chi group (who regularly practiced Tai Chi for 4 or more years) than in the untrained group. Irwin et al. demonstrated that older adults with no previous Tai Chi experience after practicing for 15 wks (1-3 times/wk), a nearly 50% increase in varicella zoster virus specific, cell-mediated immunity was found. Thus in this proposed study, we will examine the effects of regular Tai Chi practitioners on innate and adaptive immune function.

  Eligibility

Ages Eligible for Study:   30 Years to 70 Years
Genders Eligible for Study:   Both
Accepts Healthy Volunteers:   Yes
Criteria

Inclusion Criteria:

  • Has been practicing Tai Chi Chuan (TCC) for at least 3 days a week for at least 12 months.

Exclusion Criteria:

  • Any chronic systemic diseases (e.g., coronary artery disease [CAD])
  • Has cognitive impairments.
  Contacts and Locations
Choosing to participate in a study is an important personal decision. Talk with your doctor and family members or friends about deciding to join a study. To learn more about this study, you or your doctor may contact the study research staff using the Contacts provided below. For general information, see Learn About Clinical Studies.

Please refer to this study by its ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT00172679

Contacts
Contact: Li-Ying Wang, Ph.D. 886-223123456 ext 6683 liying@ntu.edu.tw

Locations
Taiwan
National Taiwan University Hospital Not yet recruiting
Taipei, Taiwan, 100
Contact: Li-Ying Wang, Ph.D.    886-223123456 ext 6683    liying@ntu.edu.tw   
School & Graduate Institute of Physical Therapy, College of Medicine, NTU Recruiting
Taipei, Taiwan, 100
Contact: Li-Ying Wang, Ph.D.    886-2-23123456 ext 6683    liying@ntu.edu.tw   
Sponsors and Collaborators
National Taiwan University Hospital
National Science Council, Taiwan
Investigators
Principal Investigator: Li-Ying Wang, Ph.D. National Taiwan University, College of Medicine
  More Information

No publications provided

ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT00172679     History of Changes
Other Study ID Numbers: 9361701225
Study First Received: September 12, 2005
Last Updated: September 26, 2007
Health Authority: Taiwan: Department of Health

Keywords provided by National Taiwan University Hospital:
Tai Chi
NK Cells
T lymphocytes
Exercise

ClinicalTrials.gov processed this record on November 24, 2014