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Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Brain Development in Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder

The recruitment status of this study is unknown because the information has not been verified recently.
Verified March 2007 by UMC Utrecht.
Recruitment status was  Recruiting
Sponsor:
Information provided by:
UMC Utrecht
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier:
NCT00143767
First received: August 31, 2005
Last updated: March 18, 2007
Last verified: March 2007
  Purpose

The primary purpose of this study is to investigate brain whether ADHD represents a disruption or a delay of brain development. Children and adolescents both with and without ADHD are asked to participate in several MRI sessions, two years apart. This will allow us to chart brain development over time, both in typical development and ADHD, and therefore to address whether ADHD represents a disruption or a delay of typical brain development.


Condition
Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder

Study Type: Observational
Study Design: Observational Model: Case Control
Time Perspective: Longitudinal
Official Title: Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Brain Development in Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder

Resource links provided by NLM:


Further study details as provided by UMC Utrecht:

Estimated Enrollment: 400
Study Start Date: August 2005
Detailed Description:

Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) is a common and impairing neuropsychiatric disorder of childhood, occurring in 3 to 5% of all school-age children. This disorder is associated with greater risks for low academic achievement, school dropouts, poor family and peer relations, aggression, substance abuse, driving accidents and chronic problems in adult adaptation. As such, it has an enormous impact on the utilization of medical and health care services, and the direct and indirect costs of this disorder are high. However, in a large number of children symptoms dissipate as they grow up and they go on to function normally and lead typical lives. This has lead to speculation that ADHD may not so much represent a disruption, as a delay of brain development. This aim of this study is to address this issue.

There is a growing body of research supporting the existence of deficits in brain anatomy associated with ADHD, with evidence of reductions in overall brain size, cortical gray matter and subcortical structures. However, reported effect sizes are small and results not always consistent. Anatomical MRI studies may be easily confounded, as brain development is complex and associated with both progressive and regressive changes in brain anatomy. In this study, we propose to combine longitudinal data from a large cohort of children and adolescents with state-of-the-art imaging methods (including diffusion tensor imaging and voxelbased morphometry) to investigate brain development in ADHD. This will allow us to address the question whether ADHD represents a disruption or a delay of brain development.

  Eligibility

Ages Eligible for Study:   6 Years to 20 Years
Genders Eligible for Study:   Both
Accepts Healthy Volunteers:   Yes
Criteria

Inclusion Criteria:

  • Aged 6 - 18 years at initial MRI

Inclusion Criteria for Subjects with ADHD:

  • DSM-IV (APA, 1994) diagnosis of ADHD, according to DISC interview
  • Scores in the clinical range on the Child Behavior Checklist (CBCL) and Teacher Rating Form(TRF)

Inclusion Criteria for Controls:

  • No DSM-IV (APA, 1994) diagnosis, according to DISC interview
  • No scores in the clinical range on the Child Behavior Checklist (CBCL) and Teacher Rating Form (TRF)

Exclusion Criteria:

  • IQ < 70
  • Major illness of the cardiovascular, the endocrine, the pulmonal or the gastrointestinal system
  • Presence of metal objects in or around the body (pacemaker, dental braces)
  • History of or present neurological disorder
  • For individuals over 12 years of age: legal incompetence, defined as the obvious inability to comprehend the information that is presented by the investigator and is outlined in the Information letter and on which the decision to participate in the study is to be based
  Contacts and Locations
Choosing to participate in a study is an important personal decision. Talk with your doctor and family members or friends about deciding to join a study. To learn more about this study, you or your doctor may contact the study research staff using the Contacts provided below. For general information, see Learn About Clinical Studies.

Please refer to this study by its ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT00143767

Contacts
Contact: Sarah Durston, Ph.D. +31 30 250 8161 S.Durston@umcutrecht.nl

Locations
Netherlands
Dept. of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, UMC Utrecht Recruiting
Utrecht, Netherlands
Contact: Janna van Belle, M.Sc.    +31 30 250 3275    J.vanBelle@umcutrecht.nl   
Principal Investigator: Janna van Belle, M.Sc.         
Principal Investigator: Patrick de Zeeuw, M.Sc.         
Sponsors and Collaborators
UMC Utrecht
Investigators
Principal Investigator: Sarah Durston, Ph.D. Rudolf Magnus Institute of Neuroscience, University Medical Center Utrecht
Study Chair: Herman van Engeland, M.D. Ph.D. Rudolf Magnus Institute of Neuroscience, University Medical Center Utrecht
  More Information

Additional Information:
No publications provided

ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT00143767     History of Changes
Other Study ID Numbers: METC 05/036
Study First Received: August 31, 2005
Last Updated: March 18, 2007
Health Authority: Netherlands: The Central Committee on Research Involving Human Subjects (CCMO)

Keywords provided by UMC Utrecht:
Magnetic Resonance Imaging

Additional relevant MeSH terms:
Attention Deficit Disorder with Hyperactivity
Disease
Hyperkinesis
Attention Deficit and Disruptive Behavior Disorders
Dyskinesias
Mental Disorders
Mental Disorders Diagnosed in Childhood
Nervous System Diseases
Neurologic Manifestations
Pathologic Processes
Signs and Symptoms

ClinicalTrials.gov processed this record on November 20, 2014