Exercise Training in Obesity-prone Black and White Women

This study has been completed.
Sponsor:
Information provided by:
National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK)
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier:
NCT00067873
First received: August 29, 2003
Last updated: January 12, 2010
Last verified: January 2010
  Purpose

Overweight premenopausal Black and White women are randomized to either diet-only, diet+aerobic or diet+resistance exercise training. Diet/behavior intervention, with or without the aerobic or resistance exercise training, will be provided throughout the 18 months of study. Major outcomes will include measures of perceived and physiologic difficulty of exercise (cardiac, ventilatory, electromyographic responses to standardized exercise tasks); aerobic fitness; strength fitness; and spontaneous free-living energy expenditure (all derived from doubly labeled water). The results will provide insight into the effectiveness of, and the mechanisms by which, different types of exercise training can improve physical fitness, spontaneous engagement in physical activities of daily living and, in turn, weight-loss maintenance.


Condition Intervention
Obesity
Behavioral: Diet
Behavioral: Exercise

Study Type: Interventional
Study Design: Allocation: Randomized
Primary Purpose: Prevention
Official Title: Exercise Training in Obesity-prone Black and White Women

Resource links provided by NLM:


Further study details as provided by National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK):

Estimated Enrollment: 231
Study Start Date: December 2000
Study Completion Date: December 2007
Detailed Description:

Overweight premenopausal Black and White women are randomized to either diet-only, diet+aerobic or diet+resistance exercise training. Diet/behavior intervention, with or without the aerobic or resistance exercise training, will be provided throughout the 18 months of study. Major outcomes will include measures of perceived and physiologic difficulty of exercise (cardiac, ventilatory, electromyographic responses to standardized exercise tasks); aerobic fitness; strength fitness; and spontaneous free-living energy expenditure (all derived from doubly labeled water). The results will provide insight into the effectiveness of, and the mechanisms by which, different types of exercise training can improve physical fitness, spontaneous engagement in physical activities of daily living and, in turn, weight-loss maintenance

  Eligibility

Ages Eligible for Study:   21 Years to 41 Years
Genders Eligible for Study:   Female
Accepts Healthy Volunteers:   Yes
Criteria
  • Normoglycemic
  • BMI between 27-30
  • Non smoker
  • Premenopausal
  • Physically untrained
  • Family history of obesity
  Contacts and Locations
Choosing to participate in a study is an important personal decision. Talk with your doctor and family members or friends about deciding to join a study. To learn more about this study, you or your doctor may contact the study research staff using the Contacts provided below. For general information, see Learn About Clinical Studies.

Please refer to this study by its ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT00067873

Locations
United States, Alabama
University of Alabama at Birmingham
Birmingham, Alabama, United States, 35294
Sponsors and Collaborators
  More Information

No publications provided by National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK)

Additional publications automatically indexed to this study by ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier (NCT Number):
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT00067873     History of Changes
Other Study ID Numbers: BLKWHT (DK49779) (completed)
Study First Received: August 29, 2003
Last Updated: January 12, 2010
Health Authority: United States: Federal Government

Additional relevant MeSH terms:
Obesity
Overnutrition
Nutrition Disorders
Overweight
Body Weight
Signs and Symptoms
Hydroquinone
Radiation-Protective Agents
Protective Agents
Physiological Effects of Drugs
Pharmacologic Actions
Antioxidants
Molecular Mechanisms of Pharmacological Action

ClinicalTrials.gov processed this record on July 20, 2014