Modifying the Home Television Watching Environment

This study has been completed.
Sponsor:
Information provided by:
National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK)
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier:
NCT00065052
First received: July 16, 2003
Last updated: January 12, 2010
Last verified: January 2010
  Purpose

The purpose of this study is to determine if limiting television (TV) and computer time will result in a stabilization or smaller increase in body mass index (BMI), lower energy intake, and increased physical activity in 4-7 year old obese (>85th BMI percentile) children over two years.


Condition Intervention
Obesity
Body Weight Changes
Behavioral: Behavior modification

Study Type: Interventional
Study Design: Allocation: Randomized
Endpoint Classification: Efficacy Study
Intervention Model: Parallel Assignment
Masking: Open Label
Primary Purpose: Prevention
Official Title: Modifying the Home Television Watching Environment

Resource links provided by NLM:


Further study details as provided by National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK):

Enrollment: 70
Study Start Date: September 2002
Study Completion Date: May 2007
Detailed Description:

There is a positive correlation between obesity and television watching in adults and children. And, television watching, controlling for current obesity, is a predictor of future obesity. Almost half of all children watch 3 or more hours of television each day. The American Academy of Pediatrics recommends that children watch no more than 1-2 hours each day.

Families will be randomized to one of two conditions. Half the families will be taught to use the TV Allowance to reduce their child's TV and computer use by one-half over a six month period and the other half will use the device to monitor TV watching (control group). This study uses TV Allowance units to monitor home television watching, video game playing, and computer use. The TV Allowance can also be used to limit the amount of TV and computer use by programming it to allow a specific number of hours for each family member. Heights, weights, food intake, and physical activity will be measured at baseline and every six months. The purpose of this study is to determine if limiting television and computer time will result in a stabilization or smaller increase in BMI, lower energy intake, and increased physical activity in 4-7 year old obese (>85th BMI percentile) children over two years.

  Eligibility

Ages Eligible for Study:   4 Years to 7 Years
Genders Eligible for Study:   Both
Accepts Healthy Volunteers:   Yes
Criteria
  • Greater than the 85th BMI percentile
  • Minimum of 15 hours of TV watching, computer use, and video game playing per week
  • No medical conditions that may affect the child's ability to safely participate in physical activity
  Contacts and Locations
Choosing to participate in a study is an important personal decision. Talk with your doctor and family members or friends about deciding to join a study. To learn more about this study, you or your doctor may contact the study research staff using the Contacts provided below. For general information, see Learn About Clinical Studies.

Please refer to this study by its ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT00065052

Locations
United States, New York
University at Buffalo
Buffalo, New York, United States, 14214
Sponsors and Collaborators
Investigators
Principal Investigator: Leonard H. Epstein, Ph.D. State Universtiy of New York at Buffalo, Department of Pediatrics
  More Information

No publications provided by National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK)

Additional publications automatically indexed to this study by ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier (NCT Number):
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT00065052     History of Changes
Other Study ID Numbers: MODHTV (completed), 1R01 DK63442
Study First Received: July 16, 2003
Last Updated: January 12, 2010
Health Authority: United States: Federal Government

Keywords provided by National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK):
physical activity
television
child obesity
Reduce TV
Usual control

Additional relevant MeSH terms:
Body Weight
Body Weight Changes
Obesity
Signs and Symptoms
Overnutrition
Nutrition Disorders
Overweight

ClinicalTrials.gov processed this record on August 28, 2014