Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for Adult Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder

This study has been completed.
Sponsor:
Collaborator:
Information provided by (Responsible Party):
Steven A. Safren, Massachusetts General Hospital
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier:
NCT00050050
First received: November 20, 2002
Last updated: May 23, 2014
Last verified: May 2014
  Purpose

This study will determine the effectiveness of cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) in treating the symptoms of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) in adults who have not responded to drug treatment.

Study hypothesis: CBT is an effective treatment for adult ADHD.


Condition Intervention Phase
Attention Deficit Disorder With Hyperactivity
Behavioral: Cognitive behavioral therapy
Drug: Drug therapy
Phase 1

Study Type: Interventional
Study Design: Allocation: Randomized
Endpoint Classification: Efficacy Study
Intervention Model: Parallel Assignment
Masking: Open Label
Primary Purpose: Treatment
Official Title: CBT for Residual ADHD Symptoms in Adults

Resource links provided by NLM:


Further study details as provided by Massachusetts General Hospital:

Primary Outcome Measures:
  • ADHD symptoms

Enrollment: 40
Study Start Date: September 2001
Study Completion Date: August 2003
Primary Completion Date: August 2003 (Final data collection date for primary outcome measure)
Detailed Description:

ADHD, previously believed to be a disorder of childhood, affects as many as 5 percent of adults. Adults with ADHD are at high risk for academic and occupational underachievement, relationship difficulties, and reduced quality of life. This study will determine whether CBT is more effective than drug therapy in treating ADHD symptoms in adults who have been resistant to previous drug therapies.

Participants will be randomly assigned to receive 12 to 15 weekly sessions of either CBT or drug therapy which may include new or previously taken drugs. Questionnaires will be used to assess participants' ADHD symptoms at study start and at study completion.

  Eligibility

Ages Eligible for Study:   18 Years to 65 Years
Genders Eligible for Study:   Both
Accepts Healthy Volunteers:   No
Criteria

Inclusion Criteria:

  • Adult ADHD of at least moderate severity
  • On current drug therapy for ADHD

Exclusion Criteria:

  • Depression, panic disorder, bipolar disorder, organic mental disorders, psychotic disorders, or pervasive developmental disorders
  • Current substance abuse or dependence
  • IQ less than 90
  • Suicide risk
  • History of cognitive behavioral therapy
  Contacts and Locations
Choosing to participate in a study is an important personal decision. Talk with your doctor and family members or friends about deciding to join a study. To learn more about this study, you or your doctor may contact the study research staff using the Contacts provided below. For general information, see Learn About Clinical Studies.

Please refer to this study by its ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT00050050

Locations
United States, Massachusetts
Massachusetts General Hospital
Boston, Massachusetts, United States, 02114
Sponsors and Collaborators
Massachusetts General Hospital
Investigators
Principal Investigator: Steven A. Safren, PhD Massachusetts General Hospital
  More Information

No publications provided

Responsible Party: Steven A. Safren, Director Behavioral Medicine, Massachusetts General Hospital
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT00050050     History of Changes
Other Study ID Numbers: R03 MH60940, R03MH060940, DSIR AT-AS
Study First Received: November 20, 2002
Last Updated: May 23, 2014
Health Authority: United States: Federal Government

Keywords provided by Massachusetts General Hospital:
Adult
ADHD
ADD

Additional relevant MeSH terms:
Attention Deficit Disorder with Hyperactivity
Hyperkinesis
Disease
Attention Deficit and Disruptive Behavior Disorders
Mental Disorders Diagnosed in Childhood
Mental Disorders
Dyskinesias
Neurologic Manifestations
Nervous System Diseases
Signs and Symptoms
Pathologic Processes

ClinicalTrials.gov processed this record on September 22, 2014