Eating Disorder Prevention Programs

This study has been completed.
Sponsor:
Collaborator:
Information provided by:
University of Texas at Austin
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier:
NCT00042185
First received: July 24, 2002
Last updated: September 26, 2013
Last verified: September 2013
  Purpose

This study evaluated 2 eating disorder prevention programs designed to increase body satisfaction among adolescent females with body image concerns.


Condition Intervention
Eating Disorders
Behavioral: Dissonance Eating Disorder Prevention Program
Behavioral: Healthy Weight Intervention
Behavioral: Expressive Writing Control Condition

Study Type: Interventional
Study Design: Allocation: Randomized
Endpoint Classification: Efficacy Study
Intervention Model: Parallel Assignment
Masking: Open Label
Primary Purpose: Prevention
Official Title: Austin Body Acceptance Study

Resource links provided by NLM:


Further study details as provided by University of Texas at Austin:

Primary Outcome Measures:
  • Eating Disorder Diagnostic Interview [ Time Frame: 1 year ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]

Secondary Outcome Measures:
  • The Ideal-Body Stereotype Scale-Revised, Satisfaction and Dissatisfaction with Body Parts Scale, Positive Affect and Negative Affect Scale-Revised [ Time Frame: 1 year ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]

Estimated Enrollment: 450
Study Start Date: February 2001
Study Completion Date: May 2007
Primary Completion Date: May 2007 (Final data collection date for primary outcome measure)
Arms Assigned Interventions
Experimental: Dissonance intervention Behavioral: Dissonance Eating Disorder Prevention Program
In this intervention, participants voluntarily engaged in verbal, written, and behavioral exercises in which they critiqued the thin-ideal ideal. These exercises were conducted in sessions and in homework activities. For example, they wrote a counter-attitudinal essay about the costs associated with pursuit of the thin-ideal and engaged in a counter-attitudinal role-play in which they attempted to dissuade facilitators from pursuing the thin-ideal.
Active Comparator: Healthy Weight Intervention Behavioral: Healthy Weight Intervention
In this intervention, participants were encouraged to make gradual healthy and lasting changes to their diet and physical activity to balance their energy needs with their energy intake, and thereby achieve a healthier weight and body satisfaction. With support from the facilitator and group members, they initiated an individual lifestyle change plan to reduce intake of fat and sugar and to increase exercise using behavioral modification principles. Food and exercise diaries were used to identify behaviors to target in this lifestyle modification and to monitor change. Motivational enhancement activities were used to promote motivation for behavior change.
Active Comparator: Expressive writing control intervention Behavioral: Expressive Writing Control Condition
In this condition, which is based on the work of Pennebaker (1997), participants wrote about emotionally significant topics in three individual weekly 45-minute sessions. They were told that research indicates that body dissatisfaction is linked to emotional issues and that expressive writing helps resolve these issues. Sample topics included relationships or goals. They were told that their work would not be read and were asked to write continuously for the duration of the session about an emotionally important topic.
No Intervention: Assessment-only control condition

Detailed Description:

Adolescent girls with body dissatisfaction (N=481; SD=1.4) were randomized to a dissonance-based thin-ideal internalization reduction program, healthy weight control program, expressive-writing control condition, or assessment-only control condition. Dissonance participants showed significantly greater decreases in thin-ideal internalization, body dissatisfaction, negative affect, eating disorder symptoms, and psychosocial impairment, and lower risk for eating pathology onset through 2-3 year follow-up than assessment-only controls. Dissonance participants showed greater decreases in thin-ideal internalization, body dissatisfaction, and psychosocial impairment than expressive-writing controls. Healthy weight participants showed greater decreases in thin-ideal internalization, body dissatisfaction, negative affect, eating disorder symptoms, and psychosocial impairment, less increases in weight, and lower risk for eating pathology and obesity onset through 2-3 year follow-up than assessment-only controls. Healthy weight participants showed greater decreases in thin-ideal internalization and weight than expressive writing controls. Dissonance participants showed a 60% reduction in risk for eating pathology onset and healthy weight participants showed a 61% reduction in risk for eating pathology onset and a 55% reduction in risk for obesity onset relative to assessment-only controls through 3-year follow-up, implying that the effects are clinically important and enduring.

  Eligibility

Ages Eligible for Study:   14 Years to 19 Years
Genders Eligible for Study:   Female
Accepts Healthy Volunteers:   Yes
Criteria

Inclusion criteria:

  • Self-reported body image concerns
  Contacts and Locations
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Please refer to this study by its ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT00042185

Locations
United States, Texas
University of Texas at Austin
Austin, Texas, United States, 78712
Sponsors and Collaborators
University of Texas at Austin
  More Information

Publications:
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT00042185     History of Changes
Other Study ID Numbers: R01 MH61957, R01MH061957, DSIR 84-CTP
Study First Received: July 24, 2002
Last Updated: September 26, 2013
Health Authority: United States: Federal Government

Keywords provided by University of Texas at Austin:
Adolescence
Prevention and Control
Bulimia

Additional relevant MeSH terms:
Eating Disorders
Mental Disorders

ClinicalTrials.gov processed this record on July 22, 2014