Quantifying Auditory Perceptual Learning Following Hearing Aid Fitting

This study has been completed.
Sponsor:
Information provided by:
Department of Veterans Affairs
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier:
NCT00013455
First received: March 14, 2001
Last updated: January 20, 2009
Last verified: May 2002
  Purpose

The purpose of this study is to examine and relate physiological, behavioral, and self-perceived changes after a period of hearing aid use and as a function of auditory training. The project will focus on the following questions: 1)Is experience-related behavioral change in hearing aid performance reflected as a neurophysiologic change? 2)Does a neurophysiologic change occur prior to or in conjunction with an experience-related behavioral change? 3) Does behavioral training modify the neurophysiologic representation of speech following the provision of hearing aids? 4)What is the relationship between physiologic, behavioral,and self-perceived change impacted by behavioral training? 5)Are neurophysiologic changes limited to trained stimuli or does auditory training alter neurophysiological responses?


Condition Intervention Phase
Hearing Loss
Device: Hearing
Phase 2

Study Type: Interventional
Study Design: Allocation: Randomized
Endpoint Classification: Efficacy Study
Intervention Model: Single Group Assignment
Masking: Open Label
Primary Purpose: Diagnostic
Official Title: Quantifying Auditory Perceptual Learning Following Hearing Aid Fitting

Resource links provided by NLM:


Further study details as provided by Department of Veterans Affairs:

Estimated Enrollment: 48
Study Start Date: August 2000
Study Completion Date: August 2003
Detailed Description:

The purpose of this study is to examine and relate physiological, behavioral, and self-perceived changes after a period of hearing aid use and as a function of auditory training. The primary objective of this study is to determine how physiological changes may be related to functional changes. The design of this experiment also will allow for evaluation of training effects, in particular, whether training enhances physiological change and further whether specific training transfers functionally and physiologically to similar stimuli. The proposed project will focus on the following questions: 1) Is an experience-related behavioral change in hearing aid performance over time reflected as a neurophysiologic change in the central auditory system? 2) Does a neurophysiologic change occur prior to or in conjunction with an experience-related behavioral change in hearing aid performance over time? 3) Does behavioral training over an extended period of time modify the neurophysiologic representation of speech following the provision of hearing aids? 4) What is the relationship between physiologic, behavioral, and self-perceived change over time and is this relationship impacted by behavioral training? 5) Are neurophysiologic changes in acoustic representations at a pre-attentive level limited to trained stimuli or does auditory training following the provision of hearing aids alter neurophysiological responses to novel speech sounds with acoustic content similar to the trained stimuli? Forty-eight hearing-impaired adults between the ages of 18 and 60 with no hearing aid experience will serve as subjects. Subjects will be randomly assigned to one of two experimental groups: a. individuals who receive auditory exposure in the real-world only; b. individuals who receive intense, controlled auditory practice with feedback, in addition to auditory exposure in the real world. Dependent variables will include measures of behavioral function (frequency specific speech recognition and confidence in different levels of noise), physiological function (amplitude and latency of mismatch negativity), and self-perception (Abbreviated Profile of Hearing Aid Benefit) over time. Data will be analyzed to evaluate relative change over time for each dependent variable and also to examine the relationship between the dependent variables considering hours of hearing aid use and audibility as potential covariates.

  Eligibility

Ages Eligible for Study:   18 Years and older
Genders Eligible for Study:   Both
Accepts Healthy Volunteers:   No
Criteria

Hearing impaired adults

  Contacts and Locations
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Please refer to this study by its ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT00013455

Locations
United States, Pennsylvania
VAMC, Pittsburgh
Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, United States
Sponsors and Collaborators
Investigators
Investigator: David Wolff, Ph.D., Special Assistant to the Director, Ph.D. Department of Veterans Affairs, Program Analysis and Review Section (PARS), Rehabilitation Research & Development Service
  More Information

No publications provided

ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT00013455     History of Changes
Other Study ID Numbers: C2236R
Study First Received: March 14, 2001
Last Updated: January 20, 2009
Health Authority: United States: Federal Government

Keywords provided by Department of Veterans Affairs:
Hearing aid, hearing impaired

Additional relevant MeSH terms:
Hearing Loss
Deafness
Hearing Disorders
Ear Diseases
Otorhinolaryngologic Diseases
Sensation Disorders
Neurologic Manifestations
Nervous System Diseases
Signs and Symptoms

ClinicalTrials.gov processed this record on August 28, 2014