Impact of Sleep Disordered Breathing in Older Adults

This study has been completed.
Sponsor:
Information provided by:
National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI)
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier:
NCT00005378
First received: May 25, 2000
Last updated: June 23, 2005
Last verified: November 2001
  Purpose

To test the hypothesis that clinically inapparent sleep-disordered breathing was associated with blood pressure elevation, impairment of health-related quality of life, and depression.


Condition
Cardiovascular Diseases
Hypertension
Depression
Sleep Apnea Syndromes
Lung Diseases

Study Type: Observational
Study Design: Observational Model: Natural History

Resource links provided by NLM:


Further study details as provided by National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI):

Study Start Date: July 1994
Estimated Study Completion Date: May 1998
Detailed Description:

BACKGROUND:

The health impact of disordered breathing during sleep among middle-aged and older men and women in the general population had not been well studied, and the need for treating relatively mild degrees of sleep-disordered breathing was unknown in 1994. The study was the first population study which examined the effect of sleep-disordered breathing on these health outcomes. The study sought to establish the prevalence of clinically important sleep-disordered breathing among middle-aged and older men and women and to provide quantitative data to serve as the basis for selecting patients for screening and deciding which patients might benefit from therapeutic intervention.

DESIGN NARRATIVE:

The study evaluated the hypothesis that clinically inapparent sleep-disordered breathing was associated with blood pressure elevation, impairment of health-related quality of life, and depression. The study used the Veterans Administration Normative Aging Study (NAS) population, which consisted of approximately 1,700 community-dwelling-men who returned for examination every three years. Respiratory function was assessed during sleep among these men and their wives using a validated method for home sleep monitoring. Blood pressure, health-related quality of life, and depression score were also assessed in the home. The potential associations of sleep-disordered breathing with hypertension, impaired health-related quality of life, and depression were evaluated, and the possibility that these relationships differed between men and women was examined.

  Eligibility

Genders Eligible for Study:   Male
Accepts Healthy Volunteers:   No
Criteria

No eligibility criteria

  Contacts and Locations
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No Contacts or Locations Provided
  More Information

No publications provided

ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT00005378     History of Changes
Other Study ID Numbers: 4276
Study First Received: May 25, 2000
Last Updated: June 23, 2005
Health Authority: United States: Federal Government

Additional relevant MeSH terms:
Cardiovascular Diseases
Depression
Hypertension
Lung Diseases
Sleep Apnea Syndromes
Apnea
Behavioral Symptoms
Dyssomnias
Nervous System Diseases
Respiration Disorders
Respiratory Tract Diseases
Sleep Disorders
Sleep Disorders, Intrinsic
Vascular Diseases

ClinicalTrials.gov processed this record on October 21, 2014